Dremel-Man (tm) question: Turning a regular snubbie into a bobbed hammer snubbie


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Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
August 2, 2008, 06:08 PM
My question relates to proper weight/mass of the hammer in order to have reliable primer strikes. Is the hammer of a revolver manufacturer who is making both bobbed and regular models going to be the same mass *except for* the thumb grip portion? Or, conversely, do they add more mass to a bobbed hammer, elsewhere on the hammer, to make up for the missing thumb grip? If the latter is the case, then I'd guess it not a good idea to self-bob a hammer.... neh?

Yes, I am the Dremel-Man and yes I ended up with a snubbie .38 in trade today, with a standard hammer. The hammer already snagged in my pocket the first quick draw practice - this is a little Taurus 85 of some flavor.

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rcmodel
August 2, 2008, 06:16 PM
You're supposed to put your thumb partially over the hammer spur as it comes out.

Least thats the way I have done it for 45 years without any problems with snagging.

But I also think bobbing a hammer is an abortion done to what was probably otherwise, a very good gun.

rcmodel

papajohn
August 2, 2008, 07:18 PM
I bobbed the hammer on my M-65 3-inch, and love it even more than I did before. Yes, I used a (gasp) Dremel. It looks good, if I do say so myself. I didn't have to adjust the hammer spring, and it has never misfired. Lop that baby off!

PJ

capttom
August 2, 2008, 07:59 PM
I amputated a hammer spur on an S&W 36 and never had a problem. I sold the gun and recently acquired another M-36 that I'll probably modify. This time I may leave a nub for my thumb since there may arise a situation for single action fire.
I read many years ago that Colt's don't respond well to de-spurring, thus the use of the shroud. I don't know about other brands.

Drail
August 2, 2008, 09:24 PM
Reducing the mass of the hammer has no effect on the force with which it strikes the firing pin. That force comes from the spring driving the hammer. Another old wives tale.

pinkymingeo
August 2, 2008, 09:34 PM
My understanding is that bobbed hammers give better ignition. Less weight but higher velocity = greater fpe at the firing pin.

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
August 3, 2008, 08:31 PM
Thanks guys.

Note: One *can* shoot single action mode without even a little nub of a spur left, and do so in a perfectly safe manner at the range, seems to me, as follows: Squeeze trigger slowly - when hammer is back a little ways, grab with off-hand thumb and pull back to click. Voila. So even a bobbed hammer can be accuracy tested, to try to evaluate mechanical accuracy. I've never done it but I will next range session. I see none of the 4 rules which would be broken by this. Been practicing this dry. I think I will be bobbing this hammer.

Looks like I ended up with the 85 SS2 in this trade:

http://www.taurususa.com/products/product-details.cfm?id=319&category=Revolver

When I'm done it will be in essence the model "CIA 850 SS 2", except with the ability to fire single action when I choose to, as described:

http://www.taurususa.com/products/product-details.cfm?id=295&category=Revolver


Best of all worlds, seems to me. :)

Haven't had a .38 snubbie in years & years - what's a good defensive load these days in +P that won't break the bank to practice with? This is an all-steel gun, so +P should still be a pussycat. Think I'll keep this one. I've heard reports of sights falling off of Tauri, but I've got that problem licked - all this gun has is a notch rear and permanently-affixed front! :p

P.S. One rather neat thing about the Don Hume "JIT Slide" holster which came with the trade, is that it works both as a belt slide OWB holster, AND is shaped such that it makes a great pocket holster, too (for large pockets anyway, like shorts), due to it being a minimalist style, and due to the "ear" on it, which rips the holster off leaving it in your pocket - coolness:

http://www.donhume.com/Products/ProductsPage.cfm?ProductID=53

Even though I let myself get clipped a little on this trade deal, I have to say I'm pretty pleased - this thing is very tight with hammer forward, and bbl & cylinders look good. Provided the cylinder gap is not excessive, that is - gonna check that tomorrow. Looks like it *may be* a bit on the large side.

mtngunr
August 3, 2008, 09:53 PM
Bobbing hammers has resulted in misfires where otherwise there weren't any...just a personal observation....a heavier mainspring would be needed to compensate for lack of mass in those cases....you don't need any sort of power tool to reduce snagging....either cover the hammer on the draw, or round/bob the hammer a bit with hacksaw/files/crocus-cloth...that way, you retain SA-fire capability.

jaydubya
August 3, 2008, 10:08 PM
rcmodel said: You're supposed to put your thumb partially over the hammer spur as it comes out.

+1 and I add this: if you dremel some of the hammer spur, you have ruined the resale value of that pistol (and yes, a revolver is a pistol).
Cordially, Jack

Craig_VA
August 3, 2008, 11:19 PM
IF you want that sort of gun, why not grab a S&W Bodyguard or equal, in trade for the 36?

Seafarer12
August 3, 2008, 11:28 PM
A Taurus 85 has no resale value so lop it off.
I would only do it to a cheap gun unless I had a spare hammer to swap it out with.

mtngunr
August 4, 2008, 01:32 AM
A Smith 36 is already as small as it gets....abbreviating the hammer makes it even more so....Bodyguards and Centennials are larger...

Shade00
August 4, 2008, 02:22 AM
To be honest, I have been thinking along the hammer-bob lines for my S&W Model 37 and my Ruger Speed Six. However, I'm going to keep my eyes pealed for an extra hammer for the S&W to perform the operation on, and I'd like to find an already-bobbed hammer for the Ruger. Of course Numrich's is out of stock...

gb6491
August 4, 2008, 03:44 AM
I did a semi-bob on my model 60 years ago and it has never failed to fire. The old shape would pinch my hand every once in a while. I also carry it IWB (and occasionally in my pocket) and wanted to reduce the chances of it snagging, but still have a good single action option. I arrived at this shape by taking enough off that it wouldn't pinch me; then removing a little at time and reshaping the spur until I was satisfied that it was pretty snag resistant (it is much more snag resistant than the shape would suggest). It is still easily cocked single action. I'm real happy with it:).
Regards,
Greg
http://gbrannon.bizhat.com/modelgohiviz_680x512.jpg

Jim Watson
August 4, 2008, 10:17 AM
Friend of mine bobbed the hammer of a Taurus 85 and misfires immediately followed.
He ended up cramming in a S&W J mainspring to get enough hammer fall. These days, maybe you could get the spring Taurus uses in their own spurless hammer guns, it is probably stronger, if they have not changed the leverages.

Squeeze trigger slowly - when hammer is back a little ways, grab with off-hand thumb and pull back to click. Voila. So even a bobbed hammer can be accuracy tested, to try to evaluate mechanical accuracy.

This used to be commonly recommended, some bob jobs even included serrating or checkering the top of the hammer.

I've never done it but I will next range session.

I have. It isn't as easy as it sounds. Be careful.

csmkersh
August 4, 2008, 11:44 AM
I've bobbed both my Pre-1982 M36 and my circa 1929 Colt DS. Both function perfectly. On the M35, I also installed a Wolfe spring set.

Oh, and both wear Tyler Ts. :)

cherryriver
August 4, 2008, 11:56 AM
I bought spare used hammers for two small-frame Colts, bobbed them with a rotary tool and a sander, threw them in and they worked perfectly.
The original hammers are stored in oil-filled baggies waiting for the day.
No harm to the value.
You might be able to get a Taurus hammer and do the same, but I offer no suggestion that you could just drop it in and have it time right and run right. I may just have been lucky.
I will say I tried both and am convinced the Agent comes out of the pocket faster, easier, and cleaner without the spur than with, thumb or no thumb.

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
August 4, 2008, 04:31 PM
Interesting replies; plz keep coming. We've got a split of authority as to whether misfires may result in the 85.

P.S. Gap looks good; pleased with trade:
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=382438

doc540
August 4, 2008, 04:36 PM
Dremel job on my M36.

Might have decreased its collectible value, but it sure increased its bet-your-life-on-it value to me.

It's a nickel, 1972, and should I ever offer it for sale (which I won't) it'll sell faster'n a minnow can swim a dipper. But not to a collector. ;)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v334/doc540/Guns/Model%2036/rosesmall9.jpg

BamaHoosier
August 4, 2008, 06:55 PM
I had a S&W Mod 10 snubby back in the 90's with a bobbed hammer.Don't know who did it,as I bought it that way.I never had any misfire problems at all with it when it was in my collection.The spur was completely removed and never snagged a pocket or holster:).However,my current wheelies(S&W 66 and Charter Arms Off-Duty) have their hammerspurs intact and I plan to keep them that way.

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
August 4, 2008, 07:38 PM
Friend of mine bobbed the hammer of a Taurus 85 and misfires immediately followed.
He ended up cramming in a S&W J mainspring to get enough hammer fall. These days, maybe you could get the spring Taurus uses in their own spurless hammer guns, it is probably stronger, if they have not changed the leverages.

Hrrrm, ok, thanks.

Archie
August 4, 2008, 11:22 PM
I've bobbed hammers on all manner of S&W revolvers; J, K and N. (I shortened the spur on a L frame, but didn't remove it completely, it was a belt gun.) I am happy to report no instances of misfires due to light hammer hits. The Ruger Security and Service Six revolvers have no problem in this regard, either; I presume the GP 100s would be just as reliable.

Don't know about Colts or lesser revolvers; I don't fool with them.

Any more, I'm not sure I would slice spurs off so quickly because of the 'original condition' factor. However, if I can locate some replacement hammers I can fit, I'll keep the original hammer original and bob the replacement.

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