Sometimes it just takes a scare


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ChrisVV
August 14, 2008, 12:25 AM
My family always kind of jokes about me always having a gun close by, even in my house...

My father is a retired LEO. He is a gun owner and him and my mother are both comfortable with firearms. Where I look at firearms for the self defense factor my parents have always thought of them for sporting purpose. My father being ex-LEO has always thought of his guns as a tool he used at work, nothing more. There is no shortage of firearms in their house though they are all locked downstairs in the safe.

With my brother and I both moved out they are home most of the time alone as my little sister is always out with friends.

This past week they were gone for 7 days and my brother and I would go by twice a day to let the dog out and turn lights on in different rooms and flip TVs on to make it look as though someone was home.

The first night they were home, while laying in bed upstairs with only the bedroom light on as they read before going to sleep, they heard a noise.

The way my dad tells it is that 9 times out of 10 my mom hears a noise and he has to tell her it was nothing. This time they both looked at one another and flipped off the bedroom lights.

It was the sound of a key going into the doorlock and being wiggled... Then nothing.

My parents told me that with 3 kids growing up in that house they had heard keys going in and out of that lock thousands of times before but this time it felt different.

My father grabbed his cellphone off his nightstand and called my sister to ask her where she was and if she was outside the house. She said no and my father hung up the phone.

He knew my brother and I would not stop by unannounced so he got out of bed and walked to the bedroom door. If he would peek out of the bedroom door he would be able to look down the stairs at the front door where they heard the noise coming from.

Just as he stuck his head out of the room he heard a thud on the front door, and then another harder thud. My father with is adrenaline pounding, realizing that they were about to be victims of a home invasion, he flicked on the light to the foyer from just outside his bedroom.

He said that he heard what sounded like a key being ripped out of the lock and then nothing.

After this incident my parents now keep a firearm in their bedroom. Sometimes all it takes is a scare.

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never_retreat
August 14, 2008, 12:33 AM
What was the thump? Did they kick in the door?

Loomis
August 14, 2008, 12:36 AM
Something's strange. Why would someone try to knock down a door that they put a key into?

SFvet
August 14, 2008, 12:43 AM
Something's strange. Why would someone try to knock down a door that they put a key into?

Probably intoxicated. As a side note - alcohol thins the blood, increases heart rate and blood pressure which means they bleed out quick. It would not be in the best interest of a drunk to get cut or shot :scrutiny:

Soybomb
August 14, 2008, 12:43 AM
Drunk with their key in the wrong door?

edit: I see SF beat me to it

I whittles what I see
August 14, 2008, 12:44 AM
They were probably trying to "lock bump" it with a generic key to break in, unless they were just so drunk they had the wrong house.

ChrisVV
August 14, 2008, 12:48 AM
Something's strange. Why would someone try to knock down a door that they put a key into?

My father and brother have a theory that someone was going to break in but were just testing to see if anyone was home first

Sticking a key in the door to appear to "have the wrong house" if they where confronted by the home owner.

My brother is LEO one county over and told me they have reports of this technique being used.

One victim said that after hearing a key go in and out of the door and not turning on any lights to alert the scumbag to someone being home, they just kicked the door open.

KC0QGL
August 14, 2008, 01:02 AM
Coming from a locksmith point of veiw, the person could have been trying to use the slide hammer method to get in. Only works on Kwikset locks. I have used this method before. Only on the up & up.

Loomis
August 14, 2008, 01:03 AM
Too bad the scum got away. I would've wanted to at least see his face. I spose that's an unnecessary risk, but that's just the way I am.

Loomis
August 14, 2008, 01:05 AM
Duh, I don't know why I didn't think of That!

The thump thump, was the sound of the scum trying to yank out the barrel and tumblers with a dent puller!

neviander
August 14, 2008, 01:24 AM
There is an entry door in my living room, and one in my bedroom (strange, I know, old house) if anyone 'bumped' anything in the middle of the night at my house, they'd see the business end of my .45, real fast.

Speaking of the scare factor, it wasn't so much a scare, as an awakening for me. My wife was 8 months pregnant, I was driving around town, working, and she calls me. I say hello like normal and she replies with sobbing saying, "I'm scared" my eyes about bulge out of my head. "What's wrong?" I ask, and she proceeds to tell me about how some guy was stalking her around the store she was at and left a nasty note under her windshield wiper....instantly, raging <>; I just happened to be just down the road from where she was parked. I tear into the parking lot and park next to her, scanning the parking lot 360 with a scowl on my face. She hands me the note after I made sure she was ok. It read like something out of Hustler, and at the end the guy said something about meeting him at the parking lot of the store across the street for....well, use your imagination. I called the cops, they got there pretty quick, they had one cruiser scan the other lot and one come question us; they never found the guy.

Long story shorter, that whole episode woke me up to the danger in waiting at every corner. Since then, I've bought my wife a 9mm and me a .45. Our CHLs are in the mail. The 9mm stays in the van, and the .45 stays on the nightstand. We'll be getting a shotgun for the front door ASAP.

It is strange though, I grew up with guns; used to study them, but in my just-after-high-school phase, I kind of forgot about them. Sometimes scary reminders are a good thing.

neviander

Treo
August 14, 2008, 01:35 AM
Probably intoxicated. As a side note - alcohol thins the blood, increases heart rate and blood pressure

Ummm, yeah. Alcohol actually depresses the CNS which lowers your BP pulse and respirations. As a side effect alcohol causes the erythrocytes (Red blood cells) to clump up( Thus actually "thickening" the blood) decreasing the flow of oxygen to the brain this causes the "drunk" sensation. So a drunk would tend to bleed out slower than a sober person.

Refferences :
The Basic EMT Copyright 1997 Mosby Lifeline.

Kind of Blued
August 14, 2008, 04:20 AM
I'm concerned for my parents in the same way. I'd rather get the "paranoid" comments for the rest of eternity than to be able to say "I told you so", but I think I'll ask them what "the plan" is the next time I see them.

bigfatdave
August 14, 2008, 07:49 AM
They were probably trying to "lock bump" it with a generic key to break in
I'd also guess a bump key attempt on what was thought to be an empty house.

U.S.SFC_RET
August 14, 2008, 08:00 AM
Either bump lock the lock or trying to rip the tumblers out.

ChrisVV
August 14, 2008, 08:53 AM
tumblers? a locksmith thing?

REPOMAN
August 14, 2008, 09:11 AM
I'd say it was a drunk that was scared to death when he saw the light come on..... Whether he thought it was the wrong house or not, he figured that either the homeowner or his wife was going to kill him..... Drinking doesn't mix w/ anything....

Aran
August 14, 2008, 09:27 AM
There have been two break-ins in the last few weeks on the block my grandmother lives in in Smalltown, New York in the last few weeks. Not even a suspect.

The police seem to be letting it go, too, as it was all minor thefts (Beer, money, etc.)

I'm seriously considering driving home and staying a week (Woohoo unemployment!) or so with her just in case, but she'd never let me in the door with anything that goes bang. (And I couldn't bring a pistol to keep hidden from her)

Happiness Is A Warm Gun
August 14, 2008, 10:41 AM
It could have been a bump key attempt.

How it happens:
BG cuts some bump key. All locks of a particular type use the same blank. BG takes blank and cuts it so the points on key are at the lowest level for that lock. 20 bump keys for most common lock types in US will open doors for about 80% of houses. Planned communities are the most vulnerable. Since a single contractor built entire community likely EVERY SINGLE house has exact same lock and thus uses same bump key. Of course here and there people may have changed their locks but the vast majority use the same lock.

So BG scopes out a house during day. Find house that looks like family is on vacation. Walks up to front door and looks at cylinder. Ring doorbell to ensure nobody is home, and generate cover for being at house. Maybe your helpful neighbor says "There not home they want to Orlando and will be back on Monday". Since most lock companies put their logo on cylinder this narrows it down to about 2-4 bump keys.

BG comes back that night w/ proper bump keys.
Insert bump key all the way.
Pull pump key out one click.
Force the bump key w/ small hammer and turn key at same time.
Lock opens.

How does a normal lock w/ proper key work
Traditional locks have a shear line. The pins in lock are different heights so they need to be raised to different heights to line up with shear line. When pins line up with shear line the key can turn and open lock.

Imagine a lock with pins that can be 1,2,3,4, or 5 units tall. The shear line is 6 units in height.
So if you have a lock with pins that are 2 units tall your key is 4 units tall. 2+4=6.

Our example lock has pins at heights 2,4,3,3,4.
The matching example key is 4,2,3,3,2.
24334
42332
=====
66666

When key is fully inserted it raises top of each pin to the shear line. The total height (key + pin) = shear line. All pins are now at shear line and lock can properly turn.

http://www.lockbumping.org/images/Pin_tumbler_with_key%5B1%5D.png

How a bump key works
Now in traditional method of picking a lock the tools in pickset are used to manually manipulate the pins to the right height and thus match the shear line, then turn cylinder and open lock.

With a bump key the force of hammer causes ALL the pins to jump at the same time.
Look at the photo above. Notice there are two sets of pins (red & blue).
The bump key forces the red pins up who slam into blue pins.
What happens in the locks is like a cue ball striking a pool ball; the cue ball stops and pool pall rolls towards the pocket
The red pins stop and gravity causes them to fall below shear line. The blue pins fly upward against the springs.

For a very short time (<1/10th second) there is nothing blocking the shearline. The red pins are below shearline and the blue pins are above it.

The key to bumping is to apply right turning pressure so at that the cylinder turns (before blue pins are pushed back below shearline by the springs.

A good thief can bump a lock in about 30 seconds. It might take more for some locks because from the outside you can't tell exactly which key to use so it might take 3-4 attempts.

skwab
August 14, 2008, 11:13 AM
thanks for the info happiness - just goes to show you that you can be doing all the right things and still be very vulnerable.

D-Day
August 14, 2008, 11:29 AM
This is why I prefer a heavy duty barn door latch on the inside of the door, perhaps in multiple locations. If it can handle a 1,200lb horse kicking it, it can handle a bad guy.

ZeSpectre
August 14, 2008, 11:41 AM
I don't remember where I read it but this reminds me of an old conversation.

"Ah you are just being paranoid, I mean what are the odds that someone will assault you in your own house"?

"I don't know, but it's not about the odds, it's about the stakes"!

just carl
August 14, 2008, 11:46 AM
I guess a fake type key could be a tool used for home breakins, but that appears to be something most wouldn't even consider. Of course all crooks are different so anything is possible.
From what happens around here is just the old fashion simple system. You park near a place where you can watch numerous houses, especially in the summer when people go on vacations. A house with no lights at night for several days is a good tip no one home. So you just go to that house and knock on the door and if someone answers you ask if the Smiths live there. If no one answers, you just kick the door in.
Acquire a phone number of a potential home from the People Search web site for phone numbers. Again, a house with no lights at night you just start calling that number. No answer and no lights, just kick in the door.
Some have a friend that works at a post office. A person contacts the post office to stop the mail for a week or so and POOF, one more breakin.
Many, many ways without playing around with a key.
One neighbor went on vacation and notified the post office, police, neighbors of the trip. One day a moving van pulled up to that house and started removing everything. Neighbors ask what was going on. The so called movers said the people that lived there liked it so much where they were at, they decided to move there. Of course when they got home from their vacation they were shocked at the empty house.

bogie
August 14, 2008, 12:16 PM
Hey, locksmith types... what do you think of Schlage?

Old Grump
August 14, 2008, 12:52 PM
Went on vacation and told the post office to hold my mail for 2 weeks, filled out the form and watched them take it in the back somewhere. When I got home 2 weeks later all my mail was piled on my front stoop along with the stop mail delivery notice. Post Office take on it was it must have been the new guy. Fortunately we didn't have a break in or any inclement weather so everything was there but it was open for anybody on the street to see. Having a cop for a neighbor didn't impress me, he could have noticed and said something to the mail man or the neighbors who all knew where I was going. Wouldn't have happened where I live now but big urban town near Chicago????????????

230RN
August 14, 2008, 01:14 PM
Wow! Good to know the "Other Guy's" strategies, like:

My father and brother have a theory that someone was going to break in but were just testing to see if anyone was home first

Sticking a key in the door to appear to "have the wrong house" if they where confronted by the home owner.

My brother is LEO one county over and told me they have reports of this technique being used.

One victim said that after hearing a key go in and out of the door and not turning on any lights to alert the scumbag to someone being home, they just kicked the door open.


Thanks all, for a very informative thread and posts!

I've said it before and I'll say it again: Sometimes it takes a good assault or a good tyranny to wake people up.

DirksterG30
August 14, 2008, 01:55 PM
There is an entry door in my living room, and one in my bedroom (strange, I know, old house) if anyone 'bumped' anything in the middle of the night at my house, they'd see the business end of my .45, real fast.

Speaking of the scare factor, it wasn't so much a scare, as an awakening for me. My wife was 8 months pregnant, I was driving around town, working, and she calls me. I say hello like normal and she replies with sobbing saying, "I'm scared" my eyes about bulge out of my head. "What's wrong?" I ask, and she proceeds to tell me about how some guy was stalking her around the store she was at and left a nasty note under her windshield wiper....instantly, raging pissed; I just happened to be just down the road from where she was parked. I tear into the parking lot and park next to her, scanning the parking lot 360 with a scowl on my face. She hands me the note after I made sure she was ok. It read like something out of Hustler, and at the end the guy said something about meeting him at the parking lot of the store across the street for....well, use your imagination. I called the cops, they got there pretty quick, they had one cruiser scan the other lot and one come question us; they never found the guy.

Long story shorter, that whole episode woke me up to the danger in waiting at every corner. Since then, I've bought my wife a 9mm and me a .45. Our CHLs are in the mail. The 9mm stays in the van, and the .45 stays on the nightstand. We'll be getting a shotgun for the front door ASAP.

It is strange though, I grew up with guns; used to study them, but in my just-after-high-school phase, I kind of forgot about them. Sometimes scary reminders are a good thing.

neviander

I'm glad your wife is OK, and that you have taken steps to protect yourselves. My wife told me of an incident where she was walking to her car at the mall one evening. She heard footsteps behind her, and she turned around to see a man following her, maybe 10 yards behind her (or at least walking in the same direction). She turned around and stared at the man. He changed direction and walked away. I don't know if he was really after her, but at least she had some level of situational awareness. Now she has SA and carries a gun and pepper spray.

You probably already know this, but make sure your wife strives to be situationally aware as well (if she isn't already). If my wife had been less aware, it is possible that not even having a gun would have helped her.

dmazur
August 14, 2008, 04:28 PM
I'm sure all the major players have a high security offering. Medeco is one of the better ones, I've heard.

Without getting into details of their design, which they are kind of protective of, their security lock has things moving in more than one plane when it unlocks with a key. So what? Well, it's almost impossible to "jar" something and have it move in multiple planes at the same time. So, the Medeco design is very resistant to bump type attacks.

This is the good side. The bad side is that, with all the precision and whatnot involved, these things cost $100-150 each.

Rugerlvr
August 14, 2008, 04:37 PM
"Ah you are just being paranoid, I mean what are the odds that someone will assault you in your own house"?

"I don't know, but it's not about the odds, it's about the stakes"!

Oh snap! I have an anti-friend who does nothing but tell me about the "odds"

I now have an excellent comeback. Thanks!

Tokugawa
August 14, 2008, 04:48 PM
Do NOT stop the paper- now the paper delivery person and all their friends know you will be gone- a favorite method, and especially conducive to long protracted break-in parties where your house sustains massive damage.
Same thing true of mail, except the PO employee's are a few steps up from the paper delivery if you are lucky.
Instead ,have a trusted friend pick up the papers and mail.

TallPine
August 14, 2008, 06:21 PM
This is the good side. The bad side is that, with all the precision and whatnot involved, these things cost $100-150 each.

The other issue with Medeco locks is that you basically cannot get another key made for them. At least that it the way that ours (came with the house) is. The key cuts are at an angle rather than straight across the key.

dmazur
August 14, 2008, 07:43 PM
Yes, it is almost impossible for a locksmith to get duplicate keys for Medeco locks.

If you are purchasing these, they recommend you order the correct number of keys at the time you order the locks.

They are kind of one-way about security at Medeco, which, if you think about it, may not be a bad thing. Inconvenient, but not necessarily bad.

blackcash88
August 14, 2008, 07:47 PM
So a drunk would tend to bleed out slower than a sober person.

I don't know about that. I have a good friend that's a tattoo artist and his shop will NOT tattoo anyone that appears drunk because they bleed too much.

Happiness Is A Warm Gun
August 14, 2008, 08:18 PM
The other issue with Medeco locks is that you basically cannot get another key made for them. At least that it the way that ours (came with the house) is. The key cuts are at an angle rather than straight across the key.

You CAN get Medeco keys the previous owner just screwed you.

First you are right you can't get Medeco keys at Home Depot, Lowes and most mom & pop locksmiths.

A bonded Medeco locksmith can either cut the keys themselves or (if they are smaller and don't have the equipment) order keys from Medeco directly.

Here is the catch. The contract prohibits duplicating from a key. They can only duplicate from the blind card. A blind card has the code they load into the machine to generate the key. Medeco keys are not traced like most other keys are. It is possible to determine the blind code from the key but duplicating/ordering keys without the blind code card is violation of the contract. A locksmith can lose their Medeco contract and never be able to purchase or install locks again. Most likely the previous owner didn't leave you the blind card so they can make keys for your house and you can't.

Simple fix. Get a Medeco dealer to rekey your locks. No need to buy new locks just get them rekeyed. If you have more than one entrance door they can be keyed alike. The dealer will give you as many keys as you; they run about $15ea. They will also give you either a blind code or signature blind code card (depends on the level of the lock). With that card (don't ever lose it) you can get unlimited keys made/ordered if you need in the future.

Bad news the older Medeco locks can be bumped. Biaxal and the newest M3 can't be but the older locks are pin & tumbler and just as vulnerable.

TallPine
August 14, 2008, 08:37 PM
You CAN get Medeco keys the previous owner just screwed you.


Oh - you have no idea! The lock was just the tip of the iceberg. :fire: She actually was going to take the lock out of the door and take it with her, but after we had a screaming argument (while her movers were here - I was standing around with the contract making sure they didn't load up appliances that went with the house) she finally left the lock and two keys. I doubt she even still had the "blind card" as she was pretty messed up. I was going to put in a different deadbolt just in case she kept another key, but it's a steel door and the new deadbolt wouldn't fit the hole.

I doubt that there's even a Medeco locksmith in the whole state of Montana, and if there is, then I would need to take the lock in to him because a house call way out here would probably cost more than a brand new Medeco lock.

If anyone really wants in, they're just going to break a window anyway :rolleyes:

HIcarry
August 14, 2008, 10:13 PM
Quote:
Probably intoxicated. As a side note - alcohol thins the blood, increases heart rate and blood pressure

Ummm, yeah. Alcohol actually depresses the CNS which lowers your BP pulse and respirations. As a side effect alcohol causes the erythrocytes (Red blood cells) to clump up( Thus actually "thickening" the blood) decreasing the flow of oxygen to the brain this causes the "drunk" sensation. So a drunk would tend to bleed out slower than a sober person.

Refferences :
The Basic EMT Copyright 1997 Mosby Lifeline.

A little off topic, but actually alcohol's effects vary by dose and frequency. In the early phases of alcohol intoxication, patients usually exhibit increased pulse, but blood pressure can be either elevated slightly (usually due to psychological influences associated with disinhibition) or decreased (due to cardiovascular effects on the heart and the vasculature). Respiratory rate is usually slower depending on the level of intoxication. Acute alcohol intoxication can also cause thrombocytopenia (low platelet count) which can be a factor in increasing the time it takes to stop bleeding. One of the primary problems associated with acute alcohol intoxication is cellular and generalized dehydration. This dehydration can cause the blood to "thicken" depending on the level of dehydration, and could theoretically affect bleeding times, although I have never really seen a drunk victim of a GSW not bleed "normally." I do not believe that the thickening of the blood or the delivery of oxygen has much to do with causing the "drunk" sensation, as alcohol acts as a direct CNS depressant.

Refernece: Marx: Rosen's Emergency Medicine, Concepts and Clinical Practices, 6th Edition, 2006
Section IV, Ch. 184 Alcohol Related Diseases

SFvet
July 2, 2010, 09:12 PM
Treo, alcohol increases heart rate as well as adrenaline. According to cardiophile.com, heart rate generally 'increases' with alcohol intake. Conversely, BP decreases at first with alcohol consumption followed by increase. Of course, all drugs affect people differently.

Additional references:

http://ezinearticles.com/?Stress-and-Alcohol&id=643192
http://www.uwstout.edu/aod/resources/alcohol/myths_facts.html

tpaw
July 2, 2010, 09:20 PM
I've heard this story before on another site. It turned out to be a drunk kid who lived next door. By the way, why dosen't your father keep a hand gun in the bedroom?

jonmerritt
July 2, 2010, 10:20 PM
Messing with locks takes to long. There are much faster ways of entering a house and taking everyone inside by shear surprise, but this of course requires some training and serious study time. I think I am giving my self away a little bit. Oh well. A pro thief will remove the door all at once, or not even bother with the door at all. Most walls of a house are easier to go through than the door. No one (hardly no one) thinks to reinforce or set alarms on the wall of a house, after all, it's a solid wall, right? WRONG. Door openings and window openings are reinforced against forced entry. At least you hope they are. But any serious force and a door or window frame will fail. And so will an unenforced wall. Pry out the siding, and the corner of the sheathing board (if any) a little insulation, drywall. Now your in the house with minimal noise or exposure. Go to the roof, lift up the shingles (or what ever) catch the edge of the sheathing, lift and your in the attic, again, minimal noise and exposure. A decent prybar will shift any wall stud or rafter out of your way. These types of entries are used for entry when the door and windows are boobie trapped, concrete wall? just a little whoomp and your in. But these methods are not used by your standard LEO, or SWAT. My point is, there is no locked door or window, or alarm system that will protect you or keep you safe. Only you can protect you and keep you safe. By the way, the whoomp to get through a concrete wall, the stuff to make it can be found under the average kitchen sink.:scrutiny:

SSN Vet
July 2, 2010, 10:52 PM
So can one of you knowledgeable locksmith types please tell me if the standard Schlage typ dead bolts can be "bumped".

I didn't think they could, since there's no knob to turn whilst bumping it.

Saw a show on the tube some time ago talking about key bumping, where they showed demos, etc... It's disheartening that anybody can pretty much buy the bump keys on line for pretty short money.

earlthegoat2
July 2, 2010, 11:50 PM
I didn't think they could, since there's no knob to turn whilst bumping it.

You dont need a knob, the key is the knob.

This thread is quite old as well but in the meantime Kwikset has upgraded some of their locks with anti bump measures. I think they are called SmartKey.

Schlage locks are sometimes bump resistant depending on the product line. If you have bump resistance and dumbell shaped pins your lock is pretty much beyond the abilities of the average criminal to tamper with.

If you want some of the most pick and bump proof locks out there you almost have to go with a company like Medeco since they have controlled keying. Somewhat difficult to get a key made ( have to go through a locksmith) hence it is also difficult to get a bump key. Look on YouTube and there will be a bunch of videos of people picking and bumping Medeco locks. These people are expert locksmiths and lock engineers and know what they are doing and have access to limitless information on the locks they are defeating.

I would not waste too much money on locks for your residence since a lock is only as strong as the door. Maybe some floor bolts or some other beefed up apparatus.

Next question will be how strong is your door and its frame.

Next will be how good of windows you have.

mack
July 3, 2010, 12:23 AM
Just a note on alcohol - individuals who are alcoholic - lose much of the clotting properties of their blood - which is why before surgery they want to know your drinking habits - as they don't want you bleeding out in surgery.

This also contributes to accidental deaths - as in a famous movie star who fell and hit his head while intoxocated - the trama to his head was non-lethal but he passed out due his high level of intoxication and then bled to death from his head wound.

F-Body Demon
July 3, 2010, 12:45 AM
I've been very close to a home invasion using the bump key. I was sleeping on the sofa next to the front door in my first apartment. I was on the other side of the door waiting to swing a camshaft from a small block chevy, it was all I had. After I heard him pull the key he tried to kick the door in (I had the deadbolt drawn, that is the only thing that saved me.) luckly he didn't make it in. I'm not sure what my life would be like today if that door frame had given up.

That was 6 years ago, I havnt spent very many nights without a firearm near me since then. And you better believe my wife is very proficient with both the 12 gauge and the 9mm. I told her to aim at the biggest part of the bad guy and to pull the trigger until it doesn't fire anymore!

Now today, sure maybe you and I could wrestle with one and win if he wasn't armed. But can your wife? Can your daughter? Your mother?

Someone here said it earlier. " It's not the odds, it's the stakes!"

hemiram
July 4, 2010, 06:19 AM
One more reason to have a couple of dogs. Years ago, a friend of mine, who is a paraplegic, was at home, and asleep. His dog, a Rottweiler, was in bed with him on the second floor of the house (He has an elevator). He heard glass break off in the distance, it didn't sound like it even came from his house, but it did, two teenagers broke the glass out next to his front door, and just opened up deadbolt by reaching inside. My friend could feel the air change when the door opened, so he knew someone had opened the door. The dog was still asleep, he always slept very soundly. My friend got his gun out of the drawer, a Browning BDA .380, and then shook the dog awake. All he had to say was "Who's there?", and the dog started sniffing the air and went into alert mode. Almost at the same exact instant, one of the kids pops up in the doorway, and the dog went after him. The house has been remodeled for handicap access, and the bathroom has two doors. The dog chased him into the bathroom, slid on the tile floor, and crashed into the walk in shower. The kid closed the rear door, and the dog was barking and trying to get through that door, when the kid closed the other one, trapping him inside the bathroom. The phone line had been cut, and my friend learned never to let your cell phone's battery go dead, so he couldn't call anyone. The kid came to the doorway again, and said, " Give us your money, and we won't hurt you!". My friend said, "I'll give you a bullet!" The kid freaked as he didn't expect a man to be there, they had seen his mother going in and out, and thought she lived there alone. He yelled to the other kid, "There's a guy upstairs and he's got a gun!", the other kid comes up and walks into my friends' bedroom, and my friend yelled "STOP!", and the kid tossed a hammer at him, and they take off. After my friend let the dog out of the bathroom (He really tore it up trying to get out), the dog went through the house, looking for the kid who locked him in the bathroom, but he was gone. One of the neighbors was getting up to go to work and saw the kids drive away in an old S-10 Chevy pickup, and as it went down the street, he got a good look at the primered paint job on the bed. When he saw the lights come on at my friend's house, he realized something was up, and he went over to see what was going on. He told the police about the truck. The police also found a couple drops of blood from when they broke the window, and when they arrested two kids in an old S-10 a couple of hours later, one of them had a cut on his hand, and confessed when told they had blood and would run his DNA, so he folded up. The other kid was hard core, and he ended up getting 5 years out of it, and the one who bled got to go to the local jail for 6 months.

I have two dogs, littermates, one can sleep through anything, but the other one hears and reacts to any noise that she doesn't expect, from a quick walk around the house, to a full blown "RED ALERT" barking fit. She probably doesn't have the guts to attack an intruder herself, but her brother does, and once he's awake, an invader who would hang around with both of them barking is pretty stupid. Someone broke one of my windows a couple years ago. I didn't hear it, and my male dog didn't either, but the female did, and she went off the deep end. The bad guy never got all the way in, and he cut himself on the glass slightly when he started to come inside and had to bail out. They never caught him, but his DNA came back as a match when he was arrested after attacking his ex-girlfriend's fiancee outside a bar a year later. He ended up getting 7 years for the attack, and he agreed to that sentence to avoid being charged with a bunch of break ins and burglaries on top of the assault.

SMMAssociates
July 4, 2010, 07:36 AM
I was sitting with the wife tonight when we started discussing our last visit to an out-of-town hotel. Told her that I'd not been able to chat with our favorite waitress (we're frequent visitors) 'cause she was chasing a guy who apparently jumped the check.

I told the wife that I didn't realize what was going on until it was long gone, and felt that I should have helped. "But what if he had a gun?...." Had to remind her again what that bulge on my beltline is :D....

(I know, off topic.... But it ties with the "you really should carry" aspects of this thread.)

'Round here, meantime, and back on topic, we moved in September, and have been trying to sell the old place for the last few months. The wife has lost three keys, so far, including both of mine.... Turned out that the kid had one.... I'm not sure those $15 Medeco's would be a good idea :D....

During the move, the kid and her boyfriend were in the family room at the new place when they caught somebody looking to kick in a cellar window. He spotted them and took off. PD never found anything. The boyfriend's taken the CHL course, but never got the license....

THEN, the other week, the boyfriend's house got kicked, and he lost four guns and some stereo and computer equipment. My daughter refused to stay there until he replaced the guns. Guess who's down one semi and one shotgun.... :D

(I'm trying to get my daughter to get licensed, but she's planning on moving to NYC. Might as well save the money....)

We have an alarm system on both of our houses, btw, and the boyfriend's got one, but it's not working.... He's moving to Cleveland RSN, so that'll probably be something for the new owners.

(My daughter was surprised to hear that she couldn't even take one with her to NYC....)

Regards,

M-Cameron
July 4, 2010, 10:02 AM
if i recall, schlage makes a pretty decent lock.....

and as for medeco.... ive seen them bumped open by a teenage girl( literally)...

the fact is there is NO lock out there that is pick/bump proof, they just dont exist .......
.......the good news is, most criminals arent going to spend the time and effort to learn how to pick/ bump a lock, there are far easier and faster ways into a house than spending a whole bunch of time fiddling around with a lock.

picking/ bumping is really only a concern of locksmiths who dont want to destroy the lock, im almost certain the guy trying to break in isnt going to share his sentiment.

certainly your house lock isnt something you want to skimp on....but at the same time, you really dont need the uberfortknoxlockmaster 90000

Art Eatman
July 4, 2010, 11:36 AM
Whee! For all that there's good info, we've gone via necrothreadia from scare and why to have self defense to locks and methods to defeat them to anecdotes about break-ins to booze and its effects and back again to locks.

Enough. :)

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