Evacuation - what do you do with your guns?


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.cheese.
August 16, 2008, 02:36 AM
I live in an evacuation zone (I'm on the intracoastal waterway less than half a mile from the ocean). With "Fay" approaching (possibly a big nothing).... I'm wondering what to do with my gun stuff if we get evacuated (we always do). Just leave it locked up? My area is one of the first to lose power in a storm, so the alarm would be out, the shutters would be up and the doors would be locked, but who knows what lengths somebody would go to break in.

Most likely, Fay will be nothing but a little rain. I'm just thinking ahead since I'm already putting up the shutters (it's just me putting them up and this is a 2 story house with a lot of windows so I needed to start early).

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RP88
August 16, 2008, 02:41 AM
I'd try and take it with you, unless that is out of the question because you have too much stuff. If that's the case, then I'd seal it away in the attic, where crooks won't generally go looking, and where flood water won't reach.

ColinthePilot
August 16, 2008, 03:05 AM
How many do you have? Is it too much stuff to load up in the car when you bug out?
When I lived in Florida, I never evacuated. We got hit a couple times, but I was a few miles inland so we never got forced to evac, and the water never got more than a foot or so. I stocked up on beer, gas, canned soup and some other essentials, loaded up all my mags, all my stripper clips (easy since I only had a pistol and an SKS at the time) and rode it out. If I had to leave, I would've skipped the beer, and loaded up the guns and ammo and headed for high ground.

whosyrdaddy
August 16, 2008, 03:09 AM
Take the sentimental stuff and over insure the rest.

dogmush
August 16, 2008, 03:16 AM
When I have to leave, I take a couple, close the RSC and chaulk the door to water proof it. If the stuff gets stolen, it's insured.

jakemccoy
August 16, 2008, 03:21 AM
Take the sentimental stuff and over insure the rest.

I agree. It's a possible SHTF situation. Survival mode wouldn't involve hauling around my entire gun collection.

Steve Raacke
August 16, 2008, 04:29 AM
I evacuated for Katrina. I don't have a lot of guns but what I had got packed in the trunk of the car and went with me. I'm not about to leave them behind for looters, or worse the government, to get ahold of.

Zip7
August 16, 2008, 08:22 AM
I'd seal it away in the attic, where crooks won't generally go looking, and where flood water won't reach.

It reached there during Katrina. In lots of places.

We've evacuated several times for hurricanes, but my home is not going to flood, nor is it very likely to be looted. Nonetheless, I have some that can't be replaced, and I take them with me.

I agree. It's a possible SHTF situation.

Of all the people affected by Katrina, it was only a SHTF situation for a tiny percentage of them. I mean in the sense that SHTF usually means on this forum. Being attacked by looters or zombies (there were no zombies, and the looting was confined to a very small area of the city).

Now when the water in your house is 8 ft deep, and rising fast, and you are still at home, I'd say that qualifies as SHTF, but you certainly aren't going to be robbed at that point, or if you are, it would be by Navy Seals. More likely you'd be in attic yourself trying to hack a hole in the roof before you drown.

I lived through all the aftermath of Katrina - 4 weeks w/ no electricity, etc.. The whole time I never saw an agent of any government anywhere near my house, and I open-carried a Stihl chainsaw the whole time. I know many others who stayed home for the storm and never saw a looter. At the time I worked at a 90,000 square foot warehouse facility in the city, and the roll up doors were all blown off the place. Nothing came in except for rain.

Most of those people you saw on TV ganged up waiting to be evacuated, and in the midst of all that horror, etc... etc... For all the drama the news made of it, any of those folks who could walk could have taken off walking in a westerly direction unarmed and empty handed and would have been out of the s*** in less than two or three miles. They would have been a hundred times more likely to find a helping hand than to run across someone who wanted to harm them.

Eric F
August 16, 2008, 09:30 AM
Take the sentimental stuff and over insure the rest. +1 and a good sd peice or two

SCKimberFan
August 16, 2008, 09:45 AM
The Intracoastal Waterway isn't the same as NOLA. Storm surge would be his biggest concern.

Take the sentimental stuff and over insure the rest.

This would be the best option, although I would certainly try to get them as high as possible. Be certain you have the serial #'s for each of them. JIC

With "Fay" approaching

The latest models are taking her towards the Gulf, so this may be moot. I hope this is the case for you .cheese.

Keep your eyes open and be prepared.

bigfatdave
August 16, 2008, 11:16 AM
Take the sentimental stuff and over insure the rest.
Have to agree there. Take the stuff that can't be replaced by insurance, and whatever you need for SD. Secure the rest as well as you can and insure.
Being prepared does NOT mean dragging 200# of guns&ammo through a disaster zone yourself. At least get a handcart if you must take all of it.

Guns and more
August 16, 2008, 11:28 AM
The Intracoastal Waterway isn't the same as NOLA. Storm surge would be his biggest concern.
Flood reached the attic in N/O because people live below sea level, and the levee failed. I'm on the other side of Florida and I'll take a couple and lock the safe. I'm hoping this one fizzles out.

Vern Humphrey
August 16, 2008, 12:02 PM
Last March, when we had such bad flooding on the White River here in Arkansas, there was a fellow living in the river bottoms with foresight. He rented two U-Haul trailers and loaded all his stuff up.

Unfortunately, this fella had what we Irish call a dhrinkin' problem. He celebrated his forsight by hoisting a few, and woke up with the water lapping at his bed, and watched the two trailers float past his bedroom window.

I don't think he ever found them.

Zip7
August 16, 2008, 01:01 PM
Flood reached the attic in N/O because people live below sea level, and the levee failed

It's reached attic height in Biloxi on a couple of occasions, and in fact has wiped houses clean away. Katrina did that, AND Camille. If you're within a mile of open water, you are vulnerable.

Most coastal cities are subject to flood, and NO is worse than most, but mostly that is because over the years the levees and channelization of the river has caused the marsh to die away, so that there is no longer a decent surge barrier. Originally, NO was a fair ways from the actual coast. Not anymore.

The oldest parts of NO were pretty much alright and didn't get severe flooding. The parts that did were the most vulnerable to the loss of the marsh barrier.

They can do whatever they want to the levees, but if there's another one, NO will flood again regardless of what they do. Levees protect against normal floods - not biblical ones. NO isn't the only place - all up and down the Mississippi, places flood, because it's a big bad river, and the levees by themselves won't hold it back if it gets fierce enough.

Dookie
August 16, 2008, 01:28 PM
if you can't take them all, take the bolt, firing pin, or something that will keep it from shooting if it does get stolen.

Old Grump
August 16, 2008, 01:33 PM
Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota got pounded this spring from heavy snowfalls and a constant deluge of rain on saturated soil. People just a few miles from me who had never had flood waters in their yard have lost their houses because floods in the basement and living room caused severe damage to the foundations, (cave ins) and a couple had caught on fire and the fire trucks couldn't get there or in one case did get there but they had other jobs to do and when they left it reignited and finished the job. I purposely bought and built in a no flood zone but the road was underwater less than a mile from me so even I am not totally safe. Have way to many to take even though I have 2 trailers but the ones I didn't take would get put up high and I would hope for the best.

Niece lives 40 miles inland in Florida and they have had to replace roof twice and have had water in their yard once so being inland in a low altitude state like Florida isn't a lot of comfort if they ever get a real nasty. The tendency for storms the last few years has been for nasty but a lot of the expense is just because we insist upon building near water and in flood plains.

Blame the French for New Orleans for the location if you want to but it was us Americans who destroyed the wetlands and built the levee's ignoring the old saw that all dams are temporary.

.cheese.
August 16, 2008, 02:38 PM
honestly... nothing is all that sentimental in the collection. I just was worried about people taking advantage of an evac zone to break in and steal stuff.

I probably should just lock everything up as best I can and write down all the serial #s. I think everything is insured these days.

Rxxdoc
August 16, 2008, 02:41 PM
Can you take any of the action or critical parts from the items you have to leave behind?

It would be a shame if somebody used your weapons against an innocent person.

Just my 2 cents.

FourNineFoxtrot
August 16, 2008, 04:03 PM
Fortunately for me, my collection is small and very portable. And if I have to get out of dodge, it all comes along.

I actually am specifically avoiding allowing my collection to grow, just because it would become less portable. Until I have a real home, somewhere that isn't likely that I'll need to evac from, I keep things light.

Of course, if at some point I do have to evacuate from my hypothetical permanent home, with a collection too large to bring along, I would probably just make sure what I leave is locked tight, and well insured. And maybe, if there's time, I would bury a few pieces (depending on the type of hazard).

C&R
August 16, 2008, 04:28 PM
It is looking like the max winds will be 90MPH. It will bring some much needed rain and probably bring down a few rotten trees. It looks like it will be going up the other coast, if so you will wont have to worry.

Keep an eye on it and prepaire.

Here is a link to the info without the media hype:

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

velocette
August 16, 2008, 04:31 PM
My guns would go in the car before anything else. I do not wish to arm an army of looters. A safe I have, but why take a chance?

Roger (south Florida)

blackcash88
August 16, 2008, 04:41 PM
If that's the case, then I'd seal it away in the attic, where crooks won't generally go looking, and where flood water won't reach.

Yeah, that'll work right up until the roof gets ripped off or a tree falls on the house. I lived through Erin, Opal, Charley, Jeanne and Francis. NEVER again. :rolleyes:

Detachment Charlie
August 16, 2008, 05:12 PM
From the latest projected tracks for Fay, it looks like it may come right up my drive.:eek:
I'm on the Gulf, just south of Sarasota. Evacuation is a cruel hoax in this part of Florida. If you chose to evacuate, leave NOW. If you don't, you'll be stuck in that long line of cars with empty gas tanks on I-75. Unless you have a hidey-hole location inland, you aren't going anywhere.
Stock up on water, canned food, good beer and whiskey, get fuel for your generator (you do have a generatyor, don't you?), and propane for your grill. And get plenty of batteries. These are NOT for flashlights; these are to keep the wife unit amused and distracted.:evil: I can't do EVERYTHING, can I?:D

PTK
August 16, 2008, 05:31 PM
When this was a concern for me, I'd leave most in my safe except for NFA items. ALL of my NFA stuff would come with me, even if I had to leave other essentials.

Duke Junior
August 16, 2008, 05:32 PM
I probably should just lock everything up as best I can and write down all the serial #s. I think everything is insured these days.

Hopefully.Most insurance companies have cut off times with storms approaching and will not make any adjustments in coverage.
Check with your carrier to be sure.Stay safe.

PTK
August 16, 2008, 05:43 PM
I should note, ANYONE who doesn't have a list of serial #s, approximate value, description, located in at least two places (bank, safe, whatever) is rather foolish.

jakemccoy
August 16, 2008, 05:45 PM
Fortunately for me, my collection is small and very portable. And if I have to get out of dodge, it all comes along.

You mean it all comes along if you're driving, right? If you have to hike at some point (car breaks down or out of gas), you could carry maybe two guns and a little ammo. If that's all you have in your collection, we'll help you come up with a different word than "collection".

skinewmexico
August 16, 2008, 05:48 PM
I'd probably put them all in aloksaks, and lock them in the safe. Or some of them.

jakemccoy
August 16, 2008, 05:53 PM
I should note, ANYONE who doesn't have a list of serial #s, approximate value, description, located in at least two places (bank, safe, whatever) is rather foolish.

I take digital pics or scans and then use an online backup system.

TCB in TN
August 16, 2008, 06:08 PM
OK I have a different idea about such a situation. Plastic lined sealed 55 gallon drums with plenty of stuff to soak up the moisture, placed as securely as you can under the house (if you have a block type foundation) or heavily chained down to something concrete to keep it from washing/floating away. I have never been though one but see to many instances of missing roof etc, to expect it to be safe there.

Catherine
August 16, 2008, 06:45 PM
I am curious here... what have you done in the PAST with bad storms, evacuations, hurricanes, etc.?

Been there - done that in ALL kinds of weather and bad storms from the east coast - born and raised, Great Lakes rural farm/lake region and out here - forest fires.

Have good insurance whether you own or rent.

If you stay - generator and gas plus the below.

Have your 'important papers' including your insurance papers ready to go - brief case or portable file, CASH, your 'survival or daily carry Guns' with Ammunition, LOCK UP your other guns and GOOD stuff if you can't haul it to your car and if you have to leave your vehicle - something that you can WALK with, your survival gear SHOULD already be READY TO GO in your vehicle or in your home, your vitamins or Rx medicine if you take any, OTC eye drops to flush out your eyes due to wind/dirt, spare eyeglasses if you wear them, your drinking WATER, a Berkey water filter if you own one, FOOD, a first aid kit, maps, paper/pen, soap, towels, change of clothes, blankets, flashlight, batteries, wind up radio or with batteries, plastic garbage bags, Toilet Paper is worth it's weight in gold, a Coleman porta potti like you see on boats or in campers, etc. YOU know the drill so I will NOT write it all down.

You should already have your regular legal will completed along with a living will and/or medical POA completed! I think that you are a young man in his 20's or so. Anyone over the age of 18 should make his/her wishes known and they should have a will done even if you are not in the military - mandatory. USE the brains and common sense that the good Lord gave you!

You can barter if you need to do this if the politicos start another, one of many, freaking WARS too. Same with weather related 'wars'.

I am going to talk to my sister down in FL later on. I know that you live down there close to her. She is close to the ocean too. I think that her husband went down to the marina already - job related.

Best wishes and God speed.

Catherine

.cheese.
August 16, 2008, 08:28 PM
I am curious here... what have you done in the PAST with bad storms, evacuations, hurricanes, etc.?

Was living elsewhere (my own apartment) which was not in an evacuation zone. Just stayed where I was..... also, I didn't own as much a year ago. Most of my guns are young.

thebaldguy
August 16, 2008, 11:03 PM
Take them along or secure them in a good safe. I like the idea of caulking up the seams on a safe to try to prevent water damage. If time permits, oil them up well and wrap up in plastic before the safe is sealed up.

Huddog
August 16, 2008, 11:29 PM
Dead on PTK, photos on disc is also recommended

dalepres
August 17, 2008, 12:17 AM
Taking your guns with you during evacuation is, I think, a bad idea. Anywhere along the evacuation route, persons you might not otherwise suspect may forcibly take your guns from you. Carry one with you at the most and make that one a gun you are reasonably willing to lose.

In advance of any evacuations, make sure that you have planned a secure and weather/moisture-proof storage for the weapons you will leave behind. When selecting the storage location, remember that there will be people who will try to illegally relieve law abiding citizens of their legally owned guns. Choose the storage location well.

Intune
August 17, 2008, 01:02 AM
Taking your guns with you during evacuation is, I think, a bad idea. Anywhere along the evacuation route, persons you might not otherwise suspect may forcibly take your guns from you. Carry one with you at the most and make that one a gun you are reasonably willing to lose.
Nope. When I gotta bug out the only person(s) that stand a chance of getting my weapons will be backed by M1A2 Abrams & Bradley's.

dalepres
August 17, 2008, 01:06 AM
My guns would go in the car before anything else. I do not wish to arm an army of looters. A safe I have, but why take a chance?


There is a possibility that your guns could be taken from your car by thugs on the side of the road. You can't protect them from well armed thugs. Better to secure them from roving bands of thugs at a fixed location before bad weather hits.

I should note, ANYONE who doesn't have a list of serial #s, approximate value, description, located in at least two places (bank, safe, whatever) is rather foolish.

I suggest emailing the list to yourself. Then you can pick up the list anywhere it is at, as long as your email provider isn't in the same weather conditions you're in.

230RN
August 17, 2008, 01:53 AM
Weren't some of the police authorities confiscating guns found in cars at roadblocks and such during the Katrina bugout?

Blackbeard
August 17, 2008, 11:15 AM
Why would they block the road leading out of town during an evacuation? Don't they block the road going back INTO the disaster area?

pharmer
August 17, 2008, 11:19 AM
I ain't going anywhere. Drop your guns off on your way out. Cleaned my garage out recently, plenty of room. Joe

MinnMooney
August 17, 2008, 11:20 AM
I'd have an arraingement with a friend/relative who doesn't live in an evacuation zone where I could temporarily store my entire collection. Every time that there is a threat of an evacuation, I'd load up the collection (& other valuables/unreplaceables) and head for their home.

from - daleprez :

There is a possibility that your guns could be taken from your car by thugs on the side of the road. You can't protect them from well armed thugs. Better to secure them from roving bands of thugs at a fixed location before bad weather hits.

Huh?!? Where are you coming up with this stuff? If you evacuate before the storm hits, there won't be any "roving bands of thugs" stopping cars on an evacuation route. Get real! & get your collection out of the zone!

.cheese.
August 17, 2008, 11:50 AM
PTK - I'll admit that my list is not up to date. I went ahead last night and updated it to include everything I currently own, as well as added a section to detail guns I have sold (just in case). I keep all of my receipts though as a backup.

Fortunately, it's looking more and more like I'm in the clear now as it looks more like Fay will hit the West coast. Good for me, bad for other THR members here on the West coast.... although it's looking like it will just be some rain and not too much to worry about.

dalepres
August 17, 2008, 12:01 PM
Nope. When I gotta bug out the only person(s) that stand a chance of getting my weapons will be backed by M1A2 Abrams & Bradley's.

That's not true at all. All it takes is one person, one shot, and your guns are in the hands of your opponent. And what happens if your opponent is carrying a badge - his own or a stolen one? Just the flash of a badge would cause enough hesitation that you may not get the first shot off against a determined confiscator.

Loomis
August 17, 2008, 12:06 PM
You keep all your guns at home?

You shouldn't do that. Spread them around. One at work. A few at a parents house. On at a cabin or trailer if you have one. One in a shed...etc

When the gubmit comes around confiscating firearms, you will wish you had them spread out.

dalepres
August 17, 2008, 12:36 PM
Why would they block the road leading out of town during an evacuation? Don't they block the road going back INTO the disaster area?

Google evacuation and roadblock. Virtually every evacuation plan in the nation includes roadblocks. To get processed at a roadblock during evacuation, simply turn off the grid-locked freeway and try to take the back road out of town that you know is wide open. And don't forget about the roadblocks you will probably face when you return as well, ensuring that only actual residents - unarmed actual residents even - get back into any disaster zone.


I'd have an arraingement with a friend/relative who doesn't live in an evacuation zone where I could temporarily store my entire collection. Every time that there is a threat of an evacuation, I'd load up the collection (& other valuables/unreplaceables) and head for their home.

What do you mean you would have? You don't already have? And what about a chemical leak or train derailment? You won't have advanced warning about the possible evacuation.

What about a tornado as in Greensburg, Kansas?

Huh?!? Where are you coming up with this stuff? If you evacuate before the storm hits, there won't be any "roving bands of thugs" stopping cars on an evacuation route.

Google Greensburg and Confiscation. Evacuating. There were armed robberies and beatings and thefts all along the evacuation routes of Katrina. Personal property taken and destroyed by gangs of thugs.

Intune
August 17, 2008, 12:44 PM
That's not true at all. All it takes is one person, one shot, and your guns are in the hands of your opponent. And what happens if your opponent is carrying a badge - his own or a stolen one? Just the flash of a badge would cause enough hesitation that you may not get the first shot off against a determined confiscator.Dang, you're right. I should have planned for the dude with the 82A1 Barrett. :rolleyes: All I need is some plate steel, ballistic glass & 500 more horses under the hood of my Suburban. :banghead:

Flash of badge=hesitation? I don't think so. Anyone approaching the vehicle will be suspect. I might not get the first shot off but I have faith that between my son with the SAR1, daughter with the 6.5x55 and my wife with the 12ga that someone is gonna have way more holes in them than I do. My family will remain in possession of our firearms AND those of the genius who attempted to weapon-jack us.

Who ever heard of LEO roadblocks on the EGRESS routes? No such animal.
There were armed robberies and beatings and thefts all along the evacuation routes of Katrina. Personal property taken and destroyed by gangs of thugs.Great reasons to be well armed.

halfacop
August 17, 2008, 12:56 PM
Upon a evacuation - I am picking a couple guns that I feel would serve me well and the rest would be stored carefully for me to get upon my return.

As far as someone trying to "confiscate" my firearms....uh....NO WAY!

Regardless of Badge or not...No one will be taking my guns without a fight. Certainly not in a time such as a evac or hunkering down to wait it out.

I would always prefer to hunker down and wait it out, but I have kids to think about so I will always try and keep them out of harms way if possiable. Which is exactly the reason why no one woudl be taking my guns...they are the very tool that helps me ensure my family's safety.

Luckily I live in a state that does not fall in the path of very many issues - thus I have had little to worry about so far. However - I remain vigilant and determined just incase.

FourNineFoxtrot
August 17, 2008, 01:30 PM
jakemccoy said:You mean it all comes along if you're driving, right?

For me, evacuate = drive. I couldn't get anywhere worth getting to on foot. If my car broke down on the way, then I'd have some hard decisions to make, unless I could make a call and get someone to pick me up, with my stuff.

dalepres
August 17, 2008, 02:21 PM
Regardless of Badge or not...No one will be taking my guns without a fight. Certainly not in a time such as a evac or hunkering down to wait it out.

You're going to shoot the National Guard kid following orders to take your gun? Regardless of what you say, you're not going to do that and we both know it.

I have not seen a single report of a gun owner fighting it out with the police or national guard in New Orleans. To do so would be suicide; you'd never win, regardless if you are constitutionally correct.

And flashing a badge will create hesitation. The guy with the badge is probably already aiming his weapon at you and you won't survive long enough to know that the badge was legit if you don't hesitate.

ronnieevans40
August 17, 2008, 11:48 PM
Pictures and stuff that cant be replaced they go first. I have 40 different guns so taking them is not an option. What I did when I lived in LA, and NC was to store the bolts in a carry all so that I could take them with should I have to leave. Insurance is also important. The reason I took the bolts is so that if they are stolen the thief cant just use them. tag everything, photo all your guns and have all SN's written down and stored with important papers you take. A good gun safe sealed and wrapped will also help with protecting your guns. One other thought, if you live in a high flood area or evac area, digitally store your photos, send copies of all important papers to a trusted family member or friend outside your area, and stay safe. Good luck and I hope this never becomes a real issue that you have to deal with.

Catherine
August 18, 2008, 02:35 AM
The NRA and other websites have films and stories of police and other 'people' confiscating guns in the Katrina situation. It would not be the FIRST time that this happened here in the USA. They were not only gangs or thugs who did these 'acts'. They were THUGS of another kind... ones who claimed it was the 'law'. UGH! Bad policemen and bad military people following ORDERS. Blackwater and other ones brought in from other states too! Good ones (Peace officers and military people.) would not have followed those !@#$ 'orders! NOT too many military and police would follow the Constitution in my opinion and they would 'follow orders' from above for fear of losing their JOBS, bennies, retirement and even worse for disobeying an ORDER especially for a military man/woman.

People walking, people in their vehicles and even gun owners in their own BOATS trying to leave areas and HELP OTHER people in their own areas had THUGS aka HIRED HELP, paid with their own tax dollars, were told to turn over their own guns! Honest people got screwed again... go figure. Go to the the NRA site and check out the law abiding men/women in boats and elsewhere who had guns POINTED at them and they were told to turn them over. Amerika?!?

It was not only the one little old lady in her OWN home where the BIG THUGS asked to see her gun and then tackled her to the FLOOR because she wanted to stay in her own home which was well supplied. I think that she had her dog with her too. BIG brave men knocking her down and dragging her out, eh? NOT!

I posted that here or elsewhere some time back.

By the way, road blocks do EXIST before, during and AFTER weather or other incidents.

Like, uh... martial law and other things in this Republic... UGH.

There are good and bad in ALL people and in ALL professions.

Catherine

Don't blame some of us... we were for candidates who gave a ____! Lesser of the evils is still EVIL.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/08/15/AR2008081503497_pf.html

U.S. May Ease Police Spy Rules
More Federal Intelligence Changes Planned

By Spencer S. Hsu and Carrie Johnson
Washington Post Staff Writers
Saturday, August 16, 2008; A01

The Justice Department has proposed a new domestic spying measure that would make it easier for state and local police to collect intelligence about Americans, share the sensitive data with federal agencies and retain it for at least 10 years.

The proposed changes would revise the federal government's rules for police intelligence-gathering for the first time since 1993 and would apply to any of the nation's 18,000 state and local police agencies that receive roughly $1.6 billion each year in federal grants.

Quietly unveiled late last month, the proposal is part of a flurry of domestic intelligence changes issued and planned by the Bush administration in its waning months. They include a recent executive order that guides the reorganization of federal spy agencies and a pending Justice Department overhaul of FBI procedures for gathering intelligence and investigating terrorism cases within U.S. borders.

Taken together, critics in Congress and elsewhere say, the moves are intended to lock in policies for Bush's successor and to enshrine controversial post-Sept. 11 approaches that some say have fed the greatest expansion of executive authority since the Watergate era.
Etc.

Catherine
August 18, 2008, 02:41 AM
PS:

NRA films of Katrina gun confiscation.

Google and all over the internet.

Untold stories...

http://www.nra.org/

http://www.gunowners.org/

http://www.jpfo.org/

Titan6
August 18, 2008, 02:55 AM
My father lives in coastal Florida. He has a motorhome that he keeps packed during the season. Any time it looks like something is headed his way he puts anything he wants to keep in it and rolls out. A motorhome can carry quite a lot, is more secure than a car and is normally considered a dwelling by the police so firearm rules may be different depending upon the state.

It also has quite a lot of range, carries with you most of the basic services for a few days without servicing and you can live out of it much more comfortably than in most other situations where you would evacuate.

Of course feeding the thing with gas prices being what they are is another story....

Zip7
August 18, 2008, 08:14 AM
Why would they block the road leading out of town during an evacuation? Don't they block the road going back INTO the disaster area?

They'd like you to think so.

I live in one of the farthest flung suburbs of NO. During Katrina, we left the night before it hit and went inland about 250m. I didn't take all my guns, but flooding is not a concern where I live, and frankly any roving bands of thugs woulld be quickly put down by good citizens.

Of course, we saw the TV footage of the storm coming in and all. My son and I came home the day after the storm hit. We brought chainsaws gas, everything we'd need. The only gun I brought back was a 357 handgun in the console of my truck, and I never touched it once or even thought about it. The only thing I worried about was the police, frankly. There was one radio station broadcasting out of NO, and they would give periodic updates about the surrounding parishes, and the only time they mentioned my parish it was to say that if you had evacuated, don't come back. You will not be allowed to enter the parish. You will be arrested if you try it.

My son got worried that we would be arrested, and kept asking me about it. I told him that we live there, and pay taxes there, so we were dang sure going there, and if they arrested us, at least we would have a place to sleep and probably lots of company.

Of course, we didn't get arrested. We cleared a couple of side roads to get to our house, and went to work on our property. Never saw any representative of the government come down my street. Did see quite a few utility company people, though...

We helped the church up the street unload supplies every single day. Churches from out of state had sent many people with TRUCKLOADS of food and water to the church by my house, and they were taking people in from St. Bernard parish, where most homes had been destroyed. That single church I guarantee helped more people in need than Fema did in my area. Church people from out of state were showing up with help literally 8 hours after the storm hit. Nobody asked them, they just loaded up a gooseneck full of stuff and headed this way.

I saw a convoy of Pike Electric trucks arrive from out of state, and quite a few people in my town were on the sides of the road cheering for them as they rolled in.

The point I'm trying to make is that while you don't want a hurricane to come to your neighborhood, if one does, it doesn't mean people are going to be out to kill you and rob you. We live our lives pretty much insulated from harsh reality most of the time. Katrina blew away the insulation and we had to deal with that harsh reality daily for a good while. No internet, no TV, no games, only work. People spent much of their time outside, either working, or helping others work. In our neighborhood, the church became the hub of the whole area. People from the church helped us clear trees, and we helped them unload supplies and patch up as needed. We took extra clothes from our house and gave them to people who had lost everything.

While it was a giant and costly PITA, I am very happy that my 13 year old son had to live through it. He missed a month of school, but learned more than he would have in years of schooling.

When society breaks down temporarily, most people will step up and keep it going on their own. Most people are not anarchists just waiting for a chance to go on a crime spree. This may not have been obvious before Katrina, but in the time after it, it became clear to us that out little corner of the world is filled with far more good people than bad, and I wouldn't trade the experience for anything in the world.

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