What happens if you shoot .222 Rem in a .223 Rem rifle?


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Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
August 17, 2008, 06:15 PM
Just fireforms and shoots? Shoot just fine even? Just curious.

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MMCSRET
August 17, 2008, 06:17 PM
As both rounds headspace on the shoulder, the 222 should move too far into the chamber to fire unless restrained by a mauser type extractor.

TexasRifleman
August 17, 2008, 06:19 PM
I believe the .222 shoulder diameter is too big to get into a .223 chamber isn't it?

Never tried but the .222 shows to have a larger diameter than .223 but it's close.

That's why you can ream the .222 out to .223 but not the other way around I think.

Interesting question.

MMCSRET
August 17, 2008, 06:26 PM
The 223 is longer.

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
August 17, 2008, 06:30 PM
Hmm, I just put a .222 Rem round into a Baikal break-open, over the extractor, and then closed the rifle. It closed, and so I think it would fire due to the extractor holding it in place, as mentioned.

Loomis
August 17, 2008, 06:35 PM
What happens?

People point and giggle.

Seriously, the 222 is too short. It should just fall in the chamber out of reach of the firing pin. It would be like trying to shoot a 9mm luger in a 38super.

If it did somehow go off, it would probably ruin the case, and maybe not extract very good.

GingerGuy
August 17, 2008, 06:40 PM
There is a good chance you will split the case on the .222 and have it stuck in the chamber. Not Good...:mad:

Alway use the caliber that's recommended by the manufacturer.

TexasRifleman
August 17, 2008, 06:42 PM
The 223 is longer.

Yeah but my reloading book here shows the .222 to be bigger around at the shoulder but I guess it's not enough to keep it from chambering.

Macchina
August 17, 2008, 06:43 PM
If you try it, be sure to videotape it.

rcmodel
August 17, 2008, 06:44 PM
Seriously, the 222 is too short. It should just fall in the chamber out of reach of the firing pin.Not if, as MMCSRET noted, you had a rifle with a controlled round feed extractor like a CZ-527, or BRNO Mini-Mauser, or the new Remington 799 Mini-Mauser.

The extractor would have the rim in control when it came out of the magazine, and it would fire if the bolt closed on it.

And it would close on it.
Case diameter is .358", one inch forward of the rim, which is identical to a .223 Remington at the same one inch from the rim.

What happens then is anyones guess.
But for sure you would have an extreme case of excess headspace.

My guess is though, it would just fire-form.

rcmodel

kcmarine
August 17, 2008, 06:47 PM
What happens? You get a YouTube worthy video.

rcmodel
August 17, 2008, 06:50 PM
I'm thinking it would be a non-event.

Or we would have heard of a whole lot of blowed-up .223 rifles over the years from it.

And we haven't.

Besides, they probably wouldn't fire in most rifles like the Remington 700 series, AR-15, or others with a "snap-over" extractor.

rcmodel

tantrix
August 17, 2008, 07:00 PM
A .223 will chamber in a .222 rifle, but if fired the .223 case will blow.

Loomis
August 17, 2008, 07:06 PM
"my reloading book here shows the .222 to be bigger around at the shoulder"

He's right. I just checked it. What this means is that the 222 might not fall into the chamber. It looks to me like the 222 and the 223 have the same taper. The 222 has a larger shoulder because it's shorter. If you were to extend the 222case to the length of the 223, I'm guessing they would have the same shoulder width.

So maybe the 222 will chamber and fire in a 223.

rcmodel
August 17, 2008, 07:08 PM
A .223 will chamber in a .222 rifle, but if fired the .223 case will blow.
No, a .223 Rem will not chamber in a .222 Rem rifle.

The .223 case will not begin to go in the .222 chamber all the way.

It is .170" longer to the shoulder on the .223.

rcmodel

tantrix
August 17, 2008, 07:15 PM
I've seen both of them interchange, but it probably depends on the rifles used. I'm sure they don't in all rifles.

rcmodel
August 17, 2008, 07:20 PM
This is about .222 Rem and .223 Rem

NOT .223 & 5.56mm.

.222 Rem is way shorter then .223, and they simply cannot interchange in any rifle.

rcmodel

Z-Michigan
August 17, 2008, 08:13 PM
As an aside, about two years ago I found one cartridge of .222 Rem in a 50-rd box of WWB bulk .223 Rem (55gr FMJ) that I had purchased. Had I not been paying attention to magazine loading, I would be able to answer the OP's question from experience.

I've still got that box and single .222 Rem cartridge somewhere. I have nothing that shoots .222 Rem. The experience didn't inspire confidence in WWB quality control.

R.W.Dale
August 17, 2008, 08:39 PM
Yeah but my reloading book here shows the .222 to be bigger around at the shoulder but I guess it's not enough to keep it from chambering.

but if this were the case you couldn't ream a .222 to .223

I believe that the shoulder diameter on .222 is as big around as that same point on a .223 case when measured from the case head forward, remember that both cases are tapered and the shoulder is farther out on a .223 thus it will be smaller. This may also offer enough of a wedge fit for a 222 round to fire in a .223 chamber without a mauser style extractor.

Art Eatman
August 17, 2008, 09:22 PM
A hazard could be that the claw extractor wouldn't hold the .222 tightly enough against the bolt face to prevent primer blowout. That's not always horrible, but it's not good.

tantrix
August 17, 2008, 09:34 PM
This is about .222 Rem and .223 Rem

NOT .223 & 5.56mm.

.222 Rem is way shorter then .223, and they simply cannot interchange in any rifle.

I'm wasn't referring to the .223 Rem & 5.56. I was referring to the .222 Rem, but upon further research it seems the .222 I saw interchange was probably the .222 Rem Magnum, and not the standard .222 Rem.


Here's the article I found that cleared it up:

http://www.reloadbench.com/cartridges/223.html

The 223 Remington is nearly identical to the 222 Remington Magnum, the only difference is the 223 has a slightly shorter case. The two are not interchangeable although the 223 will chamber in the 222 Remington Magnum rifle.

35 Whelen
August 17, 2008, 09:41 PM
You guys are a horrible influence on me! I have 1000 things I need to be doing, but I see this post and have to trot over to the shop to try it.
I have an old beater Rem. 788 in 223. I loaded a .222 cartridge with a mild load of 23 gr. of H4895 under a 50 gr. Remington SP. I initially seated the bullet for an O.A.L. of 1.30", but when I chambered the round and attempted to fire it, the firing pin couldn't reach the primer, so I pulled the bullet and reseated it long so that the bullet would engage the rifling thus holding the base of the cartridge against the bolt face. That did the trick and here are the results:

http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h6/308Scout/222in223chamber-ed.jpg

Quite predictable. A small amount of primer protrusion. Anyone shooting the rifle would've never known they'd fired any cartridge other than the one for which the rifle was chambered.

35W

tantrix
August 17, 2008, 09:54 PM
Hmm...well maybe it was a regular .222 Rem after all. This was years ago so I don't really remember if it was a .222 Rem or the .222 Rem Mag.

Thanks for the test 35 Whelen, I knew I wasn't going crazy...yet. :D

Der Verge
August 17, 2008, 10:29 PM
.223 will not chamber in a .222, but it will chamber in a .222 mag. If a .223 is fired in a .222 mag chamber, it will turn out to look like the .222 case pictured above..

Z-Michigan
August 17, 2008, 10:37 PM
I have an old beater Rem. 788 in 223. I loaded a .222 cartridge with a mild load of 23 gr. of H4895 under a 50 gr. Remington SP

And thus is born "The .222 Remington Whelen Improved."

P.O. Ackley is laughing.

35 Whelen
August 17, 2008, 10:42 PM
And thus is born "The .222 Remington Whelen Improved."

LOL!! I guess I should've lubed the case so it wouldn't have split!

35W

MMCSRET
August 17, 2008, 11:13 PM
I have seen an 8x57 fired in a rechambered 8mm/06, same situation. The extractor on the mauser bolt held the cartridge in place and it fired. It did split the 8mm case. Dropped one in the chamber and it slid in far enough that it never would have fired.

6.5x55
December 16, 2013, 06:43 PM
I saw it happen. A 222 Rem case was in among a dude's bulk box of 55gr 223 Rem ammo. It fired in a bolt gun, failing in classic case-head separation fashion.

Gtscotty
December 16, 2013, 07:04 PM
So wait, you joined 3 and a half years ago, and then waited..... biding your time until you finally got the opportunity to use your very first post to unleash a 5 year old zombie thread upon the living?

Well alright then, welcome aboard.

Edit: So was the rifle/shooter damaged?

35 Whelen
December 16, 2013, 07:36 PM
I saw it happen. A 222 Rem case was in among a dude's bulk box of 55gr 223 Rem ammo. It fired in a bolt gun, failing in classic case-head separation fashion.
I'd have to see a documented picture to believe this. Firing a .222 in a .223 is no different than fire-forming a .257 Roberts in a .257 Ackley chamber, which I have done dozens of times, same with my Pop's .338-06/338-06 Ackley. The pressure takes the path of least resistance, so to speak. In this case that would be the thinnest part of the brass that has room to swell, or the shoulder area. But just to reinforce this, here's the picture again:
http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h6/308Scout/222in223chamber-ed_zpse1d689d1.jpg (http://s60.photobucket.com/user/308Scout/media/222in223chamber-ed_zpse1d689d1.jpg.html)

See? No harm, no foul other than a ruined .222 case!

35W

R.W.Dale
December 16, 2013, 07:54 PM
It is completely different than fire forming an AI

With a properly headspaced ackley headspace is controlled by the shoulder albeit in a minimal area.

With a 222 in a 223 headspace is maintained by the extractor alone if even then.

Robert
December 16, 2013, 08:19 PM
Bad zombie. Back in the ground with you.

If you enjoyed reading about "What happens if you shoot .222 Rem in a .223 Rem rifle?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!