.22 LR conversion kit or separate .22 LR pistol?


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SKILCZ
August 20, 2008, 07:36 PM
Would you rather have a .22 LR conversion kit for a pistol you love (e.g. Kadet kit) or a separate .22 LR pistol of another brand (e.g. Ruger or Browning Buckmark). I'm not including a stand-alone Kadet b/c it's way more expensive.

On the one hand, you get trigger time for cheaper on your favorite gun. On the other hand, you get a separate gun that can function as such for home defense purposes (I know it's a .22, but it's another gun) and for purposes of taking people shooting (able to shoot 2 guns at once).

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AndyC
August 20, 2008, 08:40 PM
I like having a spare firearm, personally.

Navy joe
August 20, 2008, 08:42 PM
I don't know about the Kadet kit but if it is good, get it. The trigger time and ergonomic learning of the big gun is invaluable. I have a Marvel, what eventually transpires is the neat take it off put it on concept morphs into a dedicated lower half for the .22.

Dienekes
August 20, 2008, 09:34 PM
I have a 1970s Colt Conversion Kit for the 1911. I used it a fair amount in the past when I was shooting 1911s a lot, but not much of late. I use an old Ruger standard auto more nowadays. It's ugly, but has an excellent Volquartsen drop-in trigger and shoots like a rifle.

A subcaliber trainer is nice, but after a certain point, shooting is shooting. I do use a M18 S&W quite a bit for DA revolver work as it is identical with any K frame. I usually resort to it when I don't feel like cleaning the centerfire gun.

A quality .22 of any kind is never a mistake.

BlindJustice
August 20, 2008, 10:50 PM
No vote - both

For semi-autos I like the option of a .22 LR conversion kit, but
also just like .22 LR semi-auto stand alone.

For Revolvers - I have a 617 6" Bbl. and it's almost the
same sighting radius as my 625 5" Bbl. .45 ACP great DA
practice platform and fun gun the 617.

I also am shopping for a J-frame 63 or 34 with a 3" Bbl. to
match with my Model 60 3" Bbl. .357 Mag.

Randall

20nickels
August 20, 2008, 11:02 PM
Get the Kit. That is a now purchase with clear advantages.
Eventually I would urge you towards both as an accurate dedicated .22 target gun is a must in everyone's safe. Buy used, there are plenty of them out there and now that you already have your kit there is plenty of time to bargain shop and try things out..

Zach S
August 21, 2008, 08:24 AM
I got the conversion. And put it on a dedicated frame.

Granted, the Ciener isn't as accurate as a Ruger, but its great for shooting rotten fruit and tin cans.

I'd still like an actual .22 pistol though, since they're more accurate.

coop4u2c
August 21, 2008, 09:37 AM
You can never have too many!!!
Guns that is. Buy both!

mgkdrgn
August 21, 2008, 09:43 AM
I have a 22 conversion kit for my Glock 26 and like it just fine. Still get the "feel" of the Glock for practice .... but a lot cheaper! I shot the CCW course with it. Can switch from 9mm to 22 in about 10 seconds.

mljdeckard
August 21, 2008, 12:51 PM
I've had a couple of .22 kits, for Glock and 1911, and I love them, but at the same time, I have access to a single-six, a Mk II, and a Woodsman. I still plan on getting a Ruger eventually.

Both.

burningsquirrels
August 21, 2008, 02:38 PM
it depends on WHY you want a 22. if you want to pratice cheaper, of course a conversion kit. if you want to compete, then get a seperate 22.

jjohnson
August 21, 2008, 04:31 PM
What, you'd rather fork over the same price for something that you'll never be able to sell? I have a couple of Ruger Target Models, and like them both. I know that a fine conversion kit for a fine handgun (like a 1911) would have cost me more than either. And I don't spend any time diddling around with the kits.

Given absolutely equal price and accuracy - I'd still rather have the second gun than a really nice accessory.:scrutiny:

cerberus65
August 21, 2008, 04:40 PM
Get a separate gun. If you have to swap barrels back and forth it won't be as easy to practice with. I take a .22 pretty much every time I go to the range.

Patrick Henry
August 21, 2008, 05:57 PM
The more guns you have the better.

DoubleTapDrew
August 21, 2008, 06:08 PM
Both. I got a .22 kit for a 1911 and love being able to shoot with the same trigger and handling as my .45. But, I find myself wanting a stand-alone .22 pistol also. It's larger than a .22 needs to be and it's a little inconvenient to switch back and forth, and makes me worry I'll get careless and leave idiot marks someday with all the swapping.

wally
August 21, 2008, 09:16 PM
Unless you are a 2700 Bullseye shooter and what the same trigger for all stages, makes little sense to me. YMMV.

For SD practice, controlling the recoil for fast follow up shots is the main problem, .22's lack of recoil can't help you here. Although for aimed slow fire practice with a .22 is certainly better than dry fire.

OTOH I blow through a lot of .22lr ammo knocking over steel plates and its a boat load of fun and much cheaper than with centerfire.

--wally.

DevilDog0402
August 21, 2008, 10:04 PM
That's a touch choice, but I say you can never have enough guns, so my vote goes for a separate .22 pistol.

Juna
August 22, 2008, 07:36 PM
Interesting poll. With all the talk of conversion kits on here, I'd have thought it might tip the other way.

SKILCZ
August 22, 2008, 07:41 PM
if you want to pratice cheaper, of course a conversion kit.

That was more my goal, and I already have a CZ 75.

Pilot
August 23, 2008, 07:59 AM
That was more my goal, and I already have a CZ 75.

If you had put that in your original post I would have voted differently. Get the Kadet Kit, and add a Ruger MK II later when you have the money or want to take someone else shooting.

SKILCZ
August 23, 2008, 09:12 AM
Get the Kadet Kit, and add a Ruger MK II later when you have the money or want to take someone else shooting.

I think this is the route I'm gonna go. Kadet kit now. Ruger when I get a little extra money next time.

WoofersInc
August 23, 2008, 03:35 PM
Go for the seperate 22. Having an extra gun comes in handy for taking someone to the range. It lets both of you still shoot. I was looking at the conversion kits for my 1911, but decided on another gun and got a dedicated .22 1911 from Kimber.

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