Sighting in a 30-06


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BruceRDucer
August 24, 2008, 11:59 AM
QUESTION #1 When sighting in a Ruger M77 rifle in 30-06 and adjusting the scope, what would be the size of grained bullet you would recommend for consistency?

I've not done much of this, and I'm assuming I will sight it in at 100 yds, then 200 yds, and then 300 yds.

QUESTION #2 Do I need a bench / vise with weights etc to do this right?

QUESTION #3 Do I need a SPOTTING SCOPE?

QUESTION #4 It comes with a scope with a large fire engine RED "R" on the scope. Is this a RUGER scope?

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/:what:

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PotatoJudge
August 24, 2008, 12:07 PM
#1 thing you need is a solid rest, be it sandbags, a bipod, a lead sled, whatever. You absolutely need to know where the gun was pointed when the round went off, and that takes a steady rest and practice calling your shots.

Just pick what weight bullet you want to use for now and stick with it.

You can start sighting it in at any distance if 100 yards isn't working for you. You can move back as you get settled in with the gun and load.

You don't need a spotting scope, though a spotting scope will save you walking. Try shoot-n-see targets as a cheap alternative.

achildofthesky
August 24, 2008, 12:22 PM
I always shoot at 25 yards to start. Get a good firm rest and shoot 1 shot. If it is on the paper adjust the windage (remember if your scope is of the 1 click = 1/4" at 100 you will need 16 clicks to move an inch at 25 yards...) then adjust elevation to about 1"low at 25 yards (something like the distance of the center of the bore to the center of the cross hairs.

If it is not on the paper I half the distance and take a shot kneeling or whatever to get a rough idea where it is hitting and adjust to get it on the paper and start over again. You should be able to get a decent rifle, scope, mount & ring combo to where you want it in just a few shots max. Low drama, low round count. Then shoot for groups or load development.

If you sight in with ammo your aren't using normally be sure to check with your hunting loads or what ever.

Be safe and shoot often

Patty

cpttango30
August 24, 2008, 12:30 PM
QUESTION #1 When sighting in a Ruger M77 rifle in 30-06 and adjusting the scope, what would be the size of grained bullet you would recommend for consistency?

For Deer or game that size I would use either 150gr or 165gr bullets.

I've not done much of this, and I'm assuming I will sight it in at 100 yds, then 200 yds, and then 300 yds.

I I would sight in for 2" high at 100 yards. By doing that you should be very close to dead on at 200 yards and not much off at 300.

QUESTION #2 Do I need a bench / vise with weights etc to do this right?

Like said above you just need a solid rest to sight in. Weather it is a bipod, sandbags or a device like the lead sled doesn't matter.
QUESTION #3 Do I need a SPOTTING SCOPE?

Having a spotting scope will save you trips down range to look at your group. Although with a 3-9x40mm scope you should be able to see 30 cal bullet holes in the target.

QUESTION #4 It comes with a scope with a large fire engine RED "R" on the scope. Is this a RUGER scope?

No that should be a Redfield scope. It was a very good scope for a shooter on a budget. Leupold just bought the Redfield line from Mead optics the maker of Weaver and Simmons scopes. So look to see Redfields to start hitting the market in the next year or two....

jrfoxx
August 24, 2008, 12:39 PM
ETA: I see cpttango30 types better and faster than me, so this was all pretty well said by him/her (and at least in part by the others), but here it is, since I took the time to type it anyways :), and because I happen to agree. Solidarity, brother! :)


QUESTION #1 When sighting in a Ruger M77 rifle in 30-06 and adjusting the scope, what would be the size of grained bullet you would recommend for consistency?

I'd sight it in using whatever ammo, or at least bullet weight, you intend to shoot most often, as that will give you the most consistancy, for most of the time.

I've not done much of this, and I'm assuming I will sight it in at 100 yds, then 200 yds, and then 300 yds.

Most people start at ~25yds just to get on paper quick and easy, especially with a newly mounted scope. Starting at 100yds or more, you may very well be missing the target entirely, which makes it hard to see where the shot went, and thus get it adjusted onto the paper.

QUESTION #2 Do I need a bench / vise with weights etc to do this right?

Not really, unless you are setting it up with the intention of this being a super accurate benchrest/competition gun, IMHO. If you are getting it set up for hunting or general target shooting, just using a sandbag, bipod, or some type of supported position should be fine, really, but this is really a matter of personal preferance entirely.

QUESTION #3 Do I need a SPOTTING SCOPE?

Donbt NEED one. You should be able to see your holes with the scope on the gun most of the time. If not, no reason you cant just stop and stroll up to the target to see where a hole appeared (may not be practical at a formal range where it may be 20 minutes unti a cease fire though, so again, this will be more of a personal preferance thing really)

QUESTION #4 It comes with a scope with a large fire engine RED "R" on the scope. Is this a RUGER scope?
I beleive the big red "R" is for Redfield, isnt it? Not sure, havent seen a Redfield scope in a while (or at least havent been paying much attention). Or, it could be that Ruger is having some scopes made for them by someone, and putting thier name on them, but I'd guess they'd put the Ruger "Eagle" (or whatever it is) emblem on it as opposed to justan "R", as it would be more recognizeable as "Ruger" that way, which would be the whole point of putting your name/symbol on a product--recognition.

BruceRDucer
August 24, 2008, 12:40 PM
(remember if your scope is of the 1 click = 1/4" at 100 you will need 16 clicks to move an inch at 25 yards...) ----achildofthesky

Yes, that's what this scope says. Roger that.

------------------------------------------------------------

Okay, I've decided to get the Caldwell Lead Sled

Now I need a Spotting Scope, and budget is an issue, so I don't think a Leupold is an option.

/

Art Eatman
August 24, 2008, 01:36 PM
I've used multitudes of home-made rest systems for sight-in. Any decent, non-shaky table will work. Sandbags? I've made them from old pants legss, shirt sleeves and the zipper-type bank bags. A short length of 4x4 or two pieces of 2x4 nailed together, plus a sandbag for the forearm rest. I like to put a sandbag under the buttpad.

I generally "good-eye" boresight at 100 yards, and then go to the paper at 25 yards. Dead-on at 25 yards generally puts me around 3" high at 100 yards, which means I'm on the paper and not wasting ammo. :)

I've always sighted my '06s for 2" high at 100 which is right at dead on at 200 and about 6" low at 300. Since most deer are shot within 200 yards, thinking about the sight is not really needed. Crosshairs on target? Press/squeeze/pull, whatever word suits.

If it's a 3x9, sight in on 9X. Then check the scope by shooting a group on 3X. It should be in the same location on the target. If not, try another group at 6X and write it down so you'll know how to hold, if need be. Some scopes don't have any problem. A few do--although not often.

If the hunting is from a stand, leaving the scope on 3X gives the best field of view. If walking or sneaky-snaking around, do the same. 9X is good for prairie dogs, or for double-checking that buck that's out a way but you're not really sure if you want him. "Is he really that good? Do I want him, or should I wait?" :)

A 150-grain '06 bullet will ruin any deer in North America.

Art

dmazur
August 24, 2008, 01:44 PM
My first rifle was a Remington 742, and I adjusted a Weaver K4 without the traditional "bore-sight" because it was a semi-auto and you can't do that...

Years later I finally got a bolt-action rifle, and yes the bore-sight does save time.

You get the rifle positioned in your shooting rest and then improvise some kind of vise for the butt end. This is where the pants legs full of sand work. You have to be able to see through the scope and the barrel (bolt removed) at the same time without repositioning anything.

Shift things around until the target is centered in the bore.

Then, carefully adjust the scope until the crosshairs are also centered on the target. Don't bump the rifle! (If you do, just reposition it while looking down the bore and then go back to the scope adjustments...)

If you've done this before, my apologies for preaching to the choir... :)

SimpleIsGood229
August 24, 2008, 03:35 PM
#1: As far as bullet weight, shoot to find what's accurate, then stay with it.

#2: As Art said, home maid sandbags are just fine. The Lead Sled is good, but it often doesn't fit on the range tables. They generally put your muzzle right in the board over the bench (does that make any sense at all?). Ask me how I know.

#3: You should be able to get a spotting scope from the range house (assuming you're not blessed enough to be shooting on private property).

Hutch
August 24, 2008, 08:21 PM
If you're on a tight budget, forego the spotting scope. The walk won't kill you, and you can spend the money on more ammo.

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