New job, stupid rules, can't bring a knife to a restaraunt


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neededausername
August 28, 2008, 01:06 AM
I recently started a new job as a restaurant manager for a major chain(most of you have probably eaten there it's one of the biggest). I was reading over the policies and got to the weapons policies. It says no guns at work or on the premises. Okay I was kind of expecting that, then it says no knives. I was confused and asked the General Manager who would be training me if that meant that I couldn't bring my pocketknife to work. I explained to him that I carry it everywhere and at my previous job in the same field it was very helpful for opening boxes, etc. He told me that it would be best if I didn't. It's just a small Kershaw, no more than 3". It just seems really stupid to me that I can't carry what I consider a tool to work, but when I'm at work I have all kinds of butcher knives, cleavers, etc around me.

Oh and you should have seen the in case of a robbery video....

FYI, My wife and I want to open our own restaurants and I'm working there for the experience, they are some of the best and so is the training. When we own a place we will welcome employees and guests who want to be able to defend themselves.

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azhunter122
August 28, 2008, 01:09 AM
That is stuid, what restaraunt is it?

Duke Junior
August 28, 2008, 01:11 AM
FYI, My wife and I want to open our own restaurants and I'm working there for the experience, they are some of the best and so is the training. When we own a place we will welcome employees and guests who want to be able to defend themselves.

You sound very level headed.I'll be glad to be your first customer when you open your own restaurant.
Notify me in advance, please!:D
<<<<<<<<<<<<--------------------

azhunter122
August 28, 2008, 01:16 AM
In my state the law say no guns in restaraunts that serve alchahol, nothing about knives though.

jws527
August 28, 2008, 01:17 AM
Not surprising. Large companies (e.g. chains) aren't much different from government in many respects - that policy is an obvious example of security theater. The thought that employees cannot bring "weapons" of their own into the workplace is probably comforting to other employees - or, at least, to the committee that devised that policy. Never mind the fact that the entire restaurant is stocked with potential weapons by default...

neededausername
August 28, 2008, 01:21 AM
Sorry I won't say what restaurant, it's a major casual dining place, but at least they don't have a problem with guests carrying.

I'll make sure to hold a big benefit for the NRA after we get open and I'll invite everyone here, and on other forums I visit.

The law here as far as I know, don't have my CCW yet, is no carrying if you are a customer at a place that serves alcohol. But yeah nothing about knives.

ugaarguy
August 28, 2008, 01:28 AM
Perhaps you could get one of the Sheffield or similar box cutter blade pocket knives and leave it somewhere semi-secure at work. Leave it there as a box cutter so you don't have to use the kitchen cutlery for such tasks. If you happen to be in a rush performing your management duties you might clip it in your pocket and forget to put it up in its secure place until the end of your shift.

Neo-Luddite
August 28, 2008, 01:55 AM
Really, I wouldn't ask or tell regarding a little pocket knife. Not as fast but just as useful--get a little leatherman (or similar) multi-tool; refer to it as your 'pocket pliars'.

Or; you work for a large company that has suppliers of ALL KINDS of gear and equipment. SOMEWHERE if you REALLY, REALLY look---a utility knife or similar provided by a bona-fide supplier. It may be red, and have a temporary switch type razor on it---but you can order them by the case and carry one all day. You can produce a PO for it. You can carry it around in your pocket.

If you ask the next level (or two) up the chain for CLARIFICATION ON ALMOST ANYTHING that is listed in the handbook--you'll get them erring on the 'side of caution'--always. Don't ask-do.

And the funny thing redux; your company probably (like most) gives away little tricket gifts to employees for years of service milestones (1, 2, 5 years, etc.)--look at the catalog (oh, I BET there IS ONE) that employees may pick from. Find the nifty Swiss Army Knife with the company logo. Get one.

Failing that--have one made up WITH the logo on it. Tell no one you did it on your own, but make it a pretty knife of high quality. Then flip the thing about until hearts content. If anyone asks, tell them so-and-so (name former HR recruiter person) gave it to you.

What's that--Y-O-U are not AUTHORIZED to have knives made up WITH the company logo on them? Now, did anyone tell you that you COULDN'T???

Sales fixes everything; hit that number each month/quarter/year and you could have a pet goat in your office and NO ONE would care.

bobbarker
August 28, 2008, 02:47 AM
A lot of places consider a knife under 3 inches to be a tool anyways...might look into that and bring it up.

TAB
August 28, 2008, 02:50 AM
Here is a idea... you don't like thier policys, don't work there.

CRITGIT
August 28, 2008, 03:15 AM
The truth is you have no recourse or rights as it pertains to this or any other "reasonably/lawful" policy. Employers over the past 25 years have incredible latitude as it pertains from everything to dress code to management rights clauses and instant discharge.
Without some protections as provided by collective bargaining agreements you're, as we say, ................."screwed!"
Sadly workers rights in this great land have all but vanished since the "80's"
The good news is there's much rumbling about changing this condition.

I'd suggest unless and until it changes....you've gotten your answer.

CRITGIT

vtoddball
August 28, 2008, 12:03 PM
Here is a idea... you don't like thier policys, don't work there.

Can we get through a single thread without someone posting this obvious, useless and completely unhelpful suggestion?

The OP was simply stating he didn't like the policy, not that it was affecting his life so drastically that it had to go or he had to go.

For a forum that so often touches on reasonable and rationed responses to threats/situations, I see this inflammatory overreaction far to often.

MIL-DOT
August 28, 2008, 12:10 PM
Sometimes it's best to just ignore stupid people or stupid policies.I'd keep the knife under wraps while you're training, then when you're performing your managerial duties as head honcho, carry and use your knife discreetly.
In summary........screw 'em. :D

Siaharok
August 28, 2008, 12:11 PM
For a forum that so often touches on reasonable and rationed responses to threats/situations, I see this inflammatory overreaction far to often. If you don't like it, then go somewhere else.

And yes, that was a joke. :)

bdickens
August 28, 2008, 12:13 PM
Sometimes it is easier to ask fo forgiveness than for permission. :)

Eric F
August 28, 2008, 12:40 PM
no Mr. Manager this isnt a ball bat its a meat tenderizer!:D

IMO a ball bat is better than a 3" knife for a lot of things besides you can make it look like your trying to encourage sports...........oh what kind of resturant does not have a knife in the kitchen? I must assume its a fast food chain like Kentuckey McFried Tacos and pizza

lee n. field
August 28, 2008, 12:45 PM
Oh and you should have seen the in case of a robbery video....

Everybody runs in circles screaming?

Gator
August 28, 2008, 01:21 PM
Sometimes it is easier to ask for forgiveness than for permission.

Yep. I wouldn't have said anything, then if anyone ever asked about my knife I'd have said..."What? This is a weapon? I had no idea! ;)

JesseL
August 28, 2008, 01:29 PM
If this place is any more upscale than McDonald's, they've probably got a whole bunch of bigger knives in the kitchen plus several on each table for the customers to use.

tunnug
August 28, 2008, 01:40 PM
Kinda reminds me of a cabinet shop I used to work at.
We had a dingbat manager that decided pocketknives were too dangerous to have so she banned them at one of our safety meetings, this in a place full of chizels, saws, hammers,etc., one of the workers says out loud, your'e right, a hammer upside the head works a lot better than having to stab someone a bunch of times, she didn't know what to say.:confused:

Kentak
August 28, 2008, 01:48 PM
When I worked at Home Depot, there was a strict prohibition on bringing a knife. Instead, you were issued an approved box cutter. But, this had nothing to do with weapons. It was a safety and liability issue to cut (pun) down on the possibility of self-inflicted cuts from the use of personal knives. The issued box cutter had blades with blunted tips and a spring loaded mechanism that prevented the blade from being locked in the open position.

K

Smithiac
August 28, 2008, 02:12 PM
Here's the thing:

It's their building their business. It is their right to run it anyway they like.

Note: I am not defending their policies I for one think it is ridiculous tothink that an eatery would not allow a pocket knife. When you need to open a box use a butcher knife. Make a sheath for it and carry it with you. How could they say anything about that (use one of their knives).

Bottom line is if you had a business and required concealed carry and someone you hired would not do it you would fire them wouldn't you. My advise is to mind their policy or don't work their.

Smithiac

Sistema1927
August 28, 2008, 03:49 PM
You don't have access to the kitchen knives?

The weapon is located between your ears. If not knives, then fire extinguishers, if not fire extinguishers, then...

Carlos Cabeza
August 28, 2008, 04:01 PM
I have carried the same knife for many years and use it as a tool for many different tasks. A three inch blade isn't going to provide much in the way of protection or defense of an attacker so it is probably best to use the tools provided by the employer. I'd say just keep it concealed and never use it at work but that might be hard as it is a "habit" thing. You should have asked if "You had to leave your gun at home too!":0

akodo
August 28, 2008, 04:29 PM
When I worked at Home Depot, there was a strict prohibition on bringing a knife. Instead, you were issued an approved box cutter. But, this had nothing to do with weapons. It was a safety and liability issue to cut (pun) down on the possibility of self-inflicted cuts from the use of personal knives. The issued box cutter had blades with blunted tips and a spring loaded mechanism that prevented the blade from being locked in the open position.

I am in a place with similar rules regarding the use of safety knives...and it isn't just about not cutting yourself. box cutters, the simple kind that house a razor blade, or more complicated safety knives, all use a very small segment of the blade. This makes it much less likely that the merchandise below the cut will not be harmed.

My sister got a new peice of furniture and it has a long cut right across the top. I instantly knew it was a case of someone using a pocketknife rather than a boxcutter.

hankdatank1362
August 28, 2008, 05:07 PM
Carry a fixed blade steak knife in your back pocket from your restaurant. If anyone asks, say you just found it lying on the floor and was going to drop it off at the dish pit, but you must have forgotten.

mgkdrgn
August 28, 2008, 05:24 PM
A restaurant with no knives, even in the kitchen?

Some kind of noodle place?

BADSBSNF81
August 28, 2008, 06:34 PM
It is far eaiser to ask forgiveness than to get permission.:)

bdickens
August 28, 2008, 07:58 PM
Is there an echo in here?

jaholder1971
August 28, 2008, 11:32 PM
Quote:
Here is a idea... you don't like thier policys, don't work there.
Can we get through a single thread without someone posting this obvious, useless and completely unhelpful suggestion?

The OP was simply stating he didn't like the policy, not that it was affecting his life so drastically that it had to go or he had to go.

For a forum that so often touches on reasonable and rationed responses to threats/situations, I see this inflammatory overreaction far to often.

Sometimes the closet anarchist and wannabe dictator that resides in every Libertarian loves to beat their chests once in awhile.

The ones i really love are those who will tell you their business, their rules but if you follow their rules , are injured/killed because their rules rendered you unable to effectively defend yourself it's your own fault for being there.

Their rights are supreme and everyone else bears the responsibility.

Dark_Harvest
August 29, 2008, 12:33 AM
jaholder1971,

Would you mind clarifying what you just said?

I would really like to know how one goes from "Libertarian" to "Their rights are supreme and everyone else bears the responsibility."

Loomis
August 29, 2008, 12:48 AM
I had to repair a machine at a hog butchering plant once. Everyone had to go through a metal detector in the guard shack in the parking lot.

NO KNIVES ALLOWED

Then when the workers get their white coats and hair nets on, they each pick up a big knife and go to work cutting up pigs.

How's that for stupid?

Ben Shepherd
August 29, 2008, 12:57 AM
Well, them stepping on your toes sucks. But here's what I think's going on:

They aren't anti-weapon or defense per-se, but they ARE anti lawsiut via the corporate legal dept.... So if I was you:

Leave it in your vehichle. NOT on principal, but on utility. Use thier boxcutters and small knives for the mundane tasks. Saves your blade rough use, leaves it for when needed. But see if you can work out keeping a good kitchen knife handy. You know, working in a kitchen/restaurant you never know when you may have a need for a good knife.

Zedo
August 29, 2008, 01:19 AM
"No knives" eh . . . ???

I'm betting the kitchen is full of them, and customers get a steak knife at the table along with the standard flatwear service -- which last time I looked included a knife.

Are you really sure this is the sort of corporation you want to "train" in? If their business models about knives sux, what about the way they run the rest of the operation?

neededausername
August 29, 2008, 03:14 AM
A little clarification here. I wasn't complaining about their policies, in fact I love my job. I was just pointing out how ludicrous of a policy it really is. I would never really consider my little pocketknife as a self defense weapon unless really pushed to it. I would probably grab a sturdy wooden broom handle or something before I used the knife I carry, it's just to small and I would have to get way to close. And as I said in my original post there are all kinds of knives all over the place, some of them quite large and all very, very sharp.

ColinthePilot
August 29, 2008, 03:52 AM
I carry a pocket knife everywhere I legally can. about the only time I don't have one is inside airport security. If someone asked me not to carry it, I would pocket it anyway and they'd never know the difference. The Air Force even issued me a switchblade and will issue me an M-9 when I go to the desert, but they don't want me to have my personal weapon on base (I oblige) and warn me that the switchblade is illegal in many areas, so I probably shouldn't carry it.

Neo-Luddite
August 29, 2008, 10:50 AM
The Air Force even issued me a switchblade

Are they staging a production of West Side Story? :)

MC-1 in orange scales or the new and improved model?

Picard
August 29, 2008, 01:09 PM
So you're going to work in a kitchen, where people will have many long and sharp knives and you're worried about a pocket knife? Don't worry about the policy. It's a bunch of bull. Keep on bringing your knife to work and nobody will say anything.

TAB
August 29, 2008, 04:08 PM
So you're going to work in a kitchen, where people will have many long and sharp knives and you're worried about a pocket knife? Don't worry about the policy. It's a bunch of bull. Keep on bringing your knife to work and nobody will say anything.



so a employer trying to protect themselfs from a workmens comp claim is bull? This policy is not about having a knife for SD, its about some one cutting them selfs with it trying to open something.

If you get a paper cut and stay in the ER longer then 24 hours, OSHA, by law has to do a full inspection of your work enviroment.

JesseL
August 29, 2008, 04:40 PM
so a employer trying to protect themselfs from a workmens comp claim is bull? This policy is not about having a knife for SD, its about some one cutting them selfs with it trying to open something.

If you get a paper cut and stay in the ER longer then 24 hours, OSHA, by law has to do a full inspection of your work enviroment.

So can you explain how neededausername's pocket knife is so much more likely to result in a workmen's comp claim than the chef's knives, paring knives, meat cleavers, box cutters, fillet knives, carving knives, steak knives, butter knives, poultry shears, etc. that are already all over the restaurant?

The restaurant's owners can set whatever policy they like, but there is simply no way that this policy isn't completely stupid.

TAB
August 29, 2008, 04:56 PM
Sure can, those are tools that are used for certain tasks and only those tasks. People are trained in thier proper use. Not so with a knife.

So a workmens comp company can predict what might happen with those tools. A knife on the other hand is a big unknown to them, so they can't predict what might happen.

glockman19
August 29, 2008, 05:00 PM
Don't worry. There should be plenty of knives in a restrauant. Longer sharper ones in the kitchen.

Picard
August 29, 2008, 05:11 PM
I feel like the policy is there for when someone does screw up. Then, the company has little liability since it forbid them in the first place. It's merely a symbolic gesture.

I'd definitely have a pocket knife on me at all times. It comes in handy all of the time.

BTW, you mentioned that you had a Kershaw. I just got one of those, with the assisted opening. Best pocket knife I've ever owned!

KBintheSLC
August 29, 2008, 05:17 PM
My job does not allow weapons either, but the State law says they can do nothing but fire me if I am seen with one. So, I ignore their baseless, senseless policy and I carry my concealed weapon to work anyway. 2 years and still going. Just make sure you never tell anyone, and never expose it. Beyond that it is very unlikely that they will attempt to search you. I doubt that is legal anywhere.

JesseL
August 29, 2008, 05:20 PM
Sure can, those are tools that are used for certain tasks and only those tasks.

Uh huh, sure they are. Nobody ever misuses a tool.

People are trained in thier proper use.

Yeah, I remember attending the steak knife seminar and getting my certification. It's hanging on the wall right next to my shoelace operators license.

You can play games all day with the way training, policies, liability are supposed to work in the depths of some bureaucrats wet dream, but it doesn't change the fact that anyone who occupies and is familiar with the real world can see that the policy is weapons grade stupid.

Furthermore, blind acceptance of this kind of stupid is going to be the downfall of civilization.

TAB
August 29, 2008, 05:23 PM
I take it you have never been a employer.

JesseL
August 29, 2008, 05:34 PM
I take it you have never been a employer.

Nope, but that doesn't mean I can't understand why an employer would worry about liability (or just try to rig every possible risk in their own favor).

Many employers would cheerfully do far worse things than disallow pocketknives if they could get away with it.

762 shooter
August 29, 2008, 06:10 PM
The only time carrying should ever come up , is when everyone is thanking you.

TAB
August 29, 2008, 06:21 PM
You would be amazed what you can get away with, but you would also be amazed with what you can't

JesseL
August 29, 2008, 06:29 PM
You would be amazed what you can get away with, but you would also be amazed with what you can't

Can != should
Can't != shouldn't

I know a lot of employers get away with some truly heinous stuff, and I know a lot of employees suffer for doing things that are perfectly reasonable; and none of it surprises me anymore.

That isn't going to stop me from calling a spade a shovel and resisting the popular trends toward misplaced liability, lawyer induced hysteria, and apathy to common sense.

FWIW, my employer lets me open carry a pistol, keep a switchblade in my pocket, and get away with arguing on THR from my desk.

plumberroy
August 29, 2008, 07:38 PM
Here is a idea... you don't like thier policys, don't work there.


Can we get through a single thread without someone posting this obvious, useless and completely unhelpful suggestion?

The OP was simply stating he didn't like the policy, not that it was affecting his life so drastically that it had to go or he had to go.

For a forum that so often touches on reasonable and rationed responses to threats/situations, I see this inflammatory overreaction far to often.

obvious, useless and completely unhelpful suggestion?
Really? part of my personal values is alway being prepared part of being prepared is Having a knife and a way to start a fire. Are you suggesting I comprimise My rights and values for money? If company policies compromise my right or values not accepting the job is high on my list of options. telling me that I can't carry a knife and lighter is no more acceptable than telling me to lie to some one . neither one is going to happen the OP needs to look at is this job worth the sacrafice? Also do you really want to work for some one that does not trust you with a pocket knife? If you don't trust me I'll quit so you can hire some one you can trust.
Roy

Zedo
August 30, 2008, 05:10 PM
Management has a stupid, reactionary, and unthinking policy here.

Cars are "dangerous" and yet they allow cars in their parking lot. People get licensed and use cars everyday, without incident.

Butane lighters are dangerous. People carry them around, and yet there's been no rash of "unexplained" or "spontaneously out of control" fires.

The state has laws about "weapons" and I'm betting it includes some specific blade-length restrictions about knife carry.

Most states restrict, BY LAW rather than through company policy, the blade length of a knife that can be carried concealed on one's person.

"Open carry" of larger knifes is legal in most states.

Your employer needs -- maybe -- to restrict "open carry" and TRUST their employees to exercise reasonable behaviors with regard to carrying LEGAL knives generally.

Or is management telling you that they don't screen their employees and accordingly don't trust them with LEGAL items like knives, automobiles, and butane lighters?

Dumb, dumb, dumb . . . reactionary, unthinking, and unnecessarily restrictive.

elsullo
August 30, 2008, 08:06 PM
I too have worked some dangerous jobs with ridiculous policies. I have been assaulted, gangster women have tried to stab me, and I have been shot at too. I have gone home with gang-girl blood all over my clothes. Yet carrying a weapon of any kind was forbidden, resulting in termination and loss of pension.

The old-timers all said, "That it is better to be tried by twelve, than to be carried by six."

The mid-timers all said, that if you feel the need to carry a weapon than it is better to get a new job!

So, I finally agreed with them all. I decided that I would seek a new job----IF I was ever fired from this one for carrying self-defence implements.

Bye the way, what about self-defence sprays? A good, powerful combination pepper/CS gas spray with good range will settle a lot of hash---and I am alive to testify...............................elsullo :fire:

SeanSw
August 31, 2008, 02:38 PM
I also work in food service and was told often, for a time, that carrying a "weapon" was against policy. It blew my mind that anyone would think twice about a <3" pocket knife but ignore the shelves lined with 12" chef's, 14" carvers, 10" serrated bread knives, or the 4" paring knives in our apron pockets. It is a lame policy and I ignored it. In the most polite terms possible I tried telling them it was a lame policy and pointed out the reasons why.The reminders quit coming once passing the new hire phase and I now use a personal knife openly, and even carry a set of personal tools to fix random things throughout the kitchen. Cooks don't have time to wait for maintenance. I would rather be known as a tool user than a whiner who needs help with everything, like opening boxes (and I open a lot!)

I don't know how your immediate supervisors would ever take to your violation of written policy but perhaps once you prove yourself as an asset instead of a liability they'll let it slide. I took the open carry, in your face, approach and it has done well so far. Good luck on the job!

jaholder1971
August 31, 2008, 03:04 PM
jaholder1971,

Would you mind clarifying what you just said?

I would really like to know how one goes from "Libertarian" to "Their rights are supreme and everyone else bears the responsibility."
__________________

I think I made it pretty clear.

Libertarian thought, as I've seen it on THR, has been the idea that infringement of their rights by a government is tyranny but if they can make the rules themselves it's all good.

Then there's a few of y'all who think that if someone's hurt because of those rules then it's not their fault because you chose to follow them. Same dance you see out of government.

Sorry, but my basic human right to life and defense of same trumps property rights. If someone is unwelcome armed, then they should be unwelcome, period.

vtoddball
September 2, 2008, 11:39 AM
obvious, useless and completely unhelpful suggestion?
Really? part of my personal values is alway being prepared part of being prepared is Having a knife and a way to start a fire. Are you suggesting I comprimise My rights and values for money? If company policies compromise my right or values not accepting the job is high on my list of options. telling me that I can't carry a knife and lighter is no more acceptable than telling me to lie to some one . neither one is going to happen the OP needs to look at is this job worth the sacrafice? Also do you really want to work for some one that does not trust you with a pocket knife? If you don't trust me I'll quit so you can hire some one you can trust.

Uhh....I think you're ripping on the wrong guy. I think it's a ridiculous policy and I would probably ignore it. What I was(pretty clearly) railing against was the people whose first response to situations like this is always to "leave."

The OP was just making a statement that he was unhappy with a particular aspect of his job and there is always at least one person who can't wrap their brain around this simple fact and grunts that giving up the job and stirring ones whole life up is the solution. More complex solutions elude their single syllable thought processes.

Dark_Harvest
October 22, 2008, 05:04 AM
jaholder1971 said:
"Libertarian thought, as I've seen it on THR, has been the idea that infringement of their rights by a government is tyranny but if they can make the rules themselves it's all good."

You have confused "Libertarian" with "Liberal."

RKBABob
October 22, 2008, 10:30 AM
As I sit here at my desk at the big employment agency... where we do nothing but HR... where I do nothing but review Workers' Compensation cases, lawsuits, and incidents all day long... I can put this into perspective for you.

You can't use your own pocket knife because some nit-wit, somewhere, gave himself a superficial cut with a personally owned pocket knife, rushed himself to the ER, and spent the next 6 months on light duty doing physical therapy three times a week, then sued the employer for lost earnings potential, because the 1/4 inch scar left behind on his thumb has prevented him from being the next lead guitarist for The Rolling Stones... all of which was obviously the employers fault, since it will come out in court that there was no written policy against bringing in personally owned knives to whittle with while sitting at your desk. :banghead:

The insurance company, having grown tired of paying $65,000 in medical expenses, and $25,000 in lawyers fees to settle a case for $5000... as well as the employer, who is often forced to pay full wages to a light-duty person counting paper clips... have instituted the rigid policies, which may seem stupid, but are geared to taking away the ammo of those who see every slight self-inflicted injury in the workplace as an oportunity to retire rich. :barf:

Bear in mind, those who take advantage of a workplace injury are also working to lower your wages by costing your employer money! :fire: Yes, even in the louse only gets a $5,000 settlement, it could cost the employer 20 times that amount in wages, medical expenses, legal bills and lost productivity... and I'll tell you exactly who eventually winds up paying: other employees, through reduced wages.



To keep this self defense related... why do you need your own knife? The employer has already provided a kitchen full of them. Use theirs, and keep yours sharp longer!

hso
October 22, 2008, 10:49 AM
If the written company policy doesn't define what blade length constitutes a weapon your state law does. Most have defaulted to a 4" blade length as the limit. Some, like California, don't limit blade length on folders (yes, it's amazing that a weapon law in CA is reasonable) and some places limit them to 3.5 inches. Check the law in your state and pull a copy so you can point out you went to all the trouble to look it up in the absence of written company policy.

BTW, RKBABob is dead on target. Company policy about using pocket knives at work are usually based on bad past experience either in the company or in the industry where the company incurred some liability as a result of not prohibiting the use of personal pocket knives.

MyNameIsEarl08
October 27, 2008, 10:14 PM
geeze its just a knife. I'd rather more upset about not being able to carry the gun!

wep45
October 27, 2008, 10:45 PM
are the roaches that big:eek:

22-rimfire
October 27, 2008, 10:50 PM
Carrying a knife or firearm at work when the written policy is NOT on the premises is just a sitatution where the employer wants no responsibity if something happens involving the "weapon". Carrying is at your own risk, job etc. They don't like you and they find out you ignored the rules... you're gone. Otherwise, they usually ignore such things.

turretG
October 27, 2008, 11:51 PM
I would just throw it in my pocket and not tell Anyone about it ever. People are blabbermouths . If I needed to save my life with it I would'nt care about the job's policies. You can always find another job but your life is only once. But I'm not advocating one way or another what you should do.

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