Guns,Ammo Sales Skyrocket in New Orleans


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Duke Junior
August 30, 2008, 06:26 PM
Article speaks for itself.Katrina memories.

http://www.nola.com/hurricane/index.ssf/2008/08/gun_ammo_sales_are_brisk_ahead.html

Gun, ammo sales are brisk ahead of storm
by Chris Kirkham and Brendan McCarthy, The Times-Picayune
Friday August 29, 2008, 9:32 PM

On what would normally be a slow summer weekday, the three employees at Gretna Gun Works Inc. frantically tended to a crush of customers admiring the racks of shotguns and rifles lined up behind the glass counter.

Among the patrons: a jewelry store owner from eastern New Orleans with plans to stand guard through Gustav; two uniformed Jefferson Parish Sheriff's Office deputies inquiring about additional firearms; and an avid hunter who was in to pick up a 12-gauge he dropped off for cleaning.

"It's hurricane season, you definitely want it back now, right?" employee John DeRosier said with a grin as he handed the Beretta shotgun back to the owner.

In yet another sign of hardened sensibilities in post-Katrina New Orleans, managers of gun shops and sporting goods stores across the area report a spike in gun and ammunition sales this week.

As Gustav inches closer to the Gulf of Mexico, the stark images of looting and chaos in Katrina's wake remain fresh on residents' minds. Fears of property damage after a frustrating, three-year rebuilding process have some considering staying behind and taking security into their own hands.

Firefighters and other emergency personnel required to stay behind are among the more frequent customers, store managers said.

"I just don't think people want to be caught with their pants down, " said Robby Lack of Destrehan, who was walking out of an Academy sporting goods store this week with ammunition for the shotgun and two pistols he owns, along with gasoline containers and other hurricane supplies.

'You just never know'

Lack plans to stay behind unless Gustav strengthens to a Category 4 or 5 hurricane, although he's quick to admit that his quiet suburban subdivision likely won't see much crime.

"I'm not one of those crazy kind of people that think we're going to be at war with ourselves, but you just never know, " Lack said. "I have all the faith in the world in our law enforcement, but they can't be at every place at every time."

Charlie Marshall, a towboat captain who plans to watch over his home in Gretna, had a bleaker view of local law enforcement abilities.

"If the cops are looting, who's going to protect my ass?" he asked.

After Katrina, some police officers were spotted taking basic supplies from stores, and, in isolated cases, items that didn't appear necessary for survival.

Though frustrated after having his purchase of a .22-caliber rifle delayed by a routine background check, Marshall still had several boxes of bullets and buckshot for his shotgun and 9 mm pistol.

"Any man that doesn't stand up to protect their own assets doesn't deserve to be here, " he said.

Limits on confiscation

The right to bear arms became a flash point of controversy after Katrina, when police officers seized guns from civilians. The outcry from Second Amendment activists led more than a dozen states -- including Louisiana -- to pass laws restricting local officials from confiscating firearms during disasters.

Louisiana requires a concealed-handgun license, but no permits for other guns purchased in the state.

Before selling a gun, dealers in the state are required to run the purchaser's name through the FBI's National Instant Criminal Background Check system. Within seconds, the system tells dealers whether the person can purchase a gun, or if more information is needed.

The FBI collects those inquiries on a statewide basis, so no data for the New Orleans area was available. This month, there have been 16,968 inquiries throughout the state, compared with 17,062 for August 2007.

Corporate spokeswomen at both Academy Sports and Outdoors and Wal-Mart declined to comment on the rate of firearms or ammunition purchases this week. But traffic through the ammunition aisles at the West Bank Academy was brisk, and lines at the gun counter remained steady this week.

Kevin Griffin, a manager at the Jefferson Gun Outlet in Metairie, said crowds in the store this week resembled the first day of hunting season. Even though the storm's path is still up in the air, residents are buying ammunition just like necessities such as batteries and water, he said.

"It's just like any other hurricane supply, " Griffin said. "People are getting ready."

Inside the dimly lit, wood-paneled Gretna Gun Works, a 60-year-old mainstay for new and antique firearms near the Gretna riverfront, workers have seen nearly a twofold increase in business this week. A black-and-white framed photo of former Sheriff Harry Lee, surrounded by two stuffed pheasants, looked down on the store workers as they enjoyed a rare pause in business.

DeRosier stood in front of a bumper sticker that read, "Gun control means using both hands, " as he matter-of-factly gave his analysis of looting after Katrina.

"They didn't break in where the people had shotguns, " he said.

Chris Kirkham can be reached at ckirkham@timespicayune.com or 504.826.3786. Brendan McCarthy can be reached at bmccarthy@timespicayune.com or 504.826.3301.

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Zedo
August 30, 2008, 06:30 PM
And so it's not a reaction to all the Republicans headed into the area for the convention? :D

Drgong
August 30, 2008, 06:31 PM
DeRosier stood in front of a bumper sticker that read, "Gun control means using both hands, " as he matter-of-factly gave his analysis of looting after Katrina.

Good point :)

Joe Cool
August 30, 2008, 06:33 PM
Yes and let's hope many of the police officers won't abandon their jobs if Gustav is bad this time, either!

harmonic
August 30, 2008, 09:25 PM
"I have all the faith in the world in our law enforcement

Really?

Duke Junior
August 30, 2008, 09:35 PM
This is the quote I like,because it's so true in NOLA.

Charlie Marshall, a towboat captain who plans to watch over his home in Gretna, had a bleaker view of local law enforcement abilities.

"If the cops are looting, who's going to protect my ass?" he asked.

Z-Michigan
August 30, 2008, 10:13 PM
I think this speaks most loudly on two points:
1) A large number of people believe firearms are valuable for defense and times when LE is not present. This is good.
2) Another large number of people fail to plan ahead for entirely predictable risks. Anyone who did wouldn't have reason to buy more guns or ammo a day before the hurricane hits. I'll bet most THR members wouldn't have any need to do so.

Lashlarue
August 30, 2008, 10:35 PM
They are not allowing anyone to stay in their homes, you either leave town or go to one of their assigned shelters.Ray doesn't want any interference with the police and national guard as they loot the city!

B.D. Turner
August 30, 2008, 10:53 PM
I thought there was a big gun grab after Katrina. Will these folks be forced to give em up?

22-rimfire
August 30, 2008, 10:59 PM
I wonder how this whole deal will play out if the governor orders the evacuation of NO? Hence no body should be there period?

Maybe someone can answer this but are evacuations mandatory if so directed by the governor?

Sales appear to be about the same as last year, but I suspect ammunition sales are brisk.

B.D. Turner
August 30, 2008, 11:01 PM
I am a firm believer that there are places on earth where people should not live. That low country is one of them.

Treo
August 30, 2008, 11:01 PM
I thought they said there would be no shelters and if you stayed behind you were on your own.

TStorm
August 30, 2008, 11:18 PM
I thought they said there would be no shelters and if you stayed behind you were on your own.
On your own is on your own. A case of ammo and a utility rifle is a sound investment if you are not below sea level or in the surge zones.

If you are in the low areas, the money would be better spent on contingency expenses related to evacuation. If you are not, more power to you!

Someone in the upcountry told me they were stocking up on beer! They are not in the evacuation zone, but I imagine most of the state will see significant weather. Everyone will be hunkered down for the storm and not much will happen anywhere until after he passes. Everyone's needs differ :).

Zip7
August 30, 2008, 11:23 PM
Someone in the upcountry told me they were stocking up on beer!

MOST people I saw in the grocery store today were stocking up on beer and charcoal. The day after the storm, SOP is grill all the meat and have a cold one after cutting up trees all day.

Treo
August 31, 2008, 12:18 AM
I am a firm believer that there are places on earth where people should not live. That low country is one of them.

+1 That's kinda asking for it isn't it? I can't imagine why anybody would want to live on a bullseye like that.

That said if it was me I stock up on smokes and sell them after the storm 10.00$ a pack.

FLA2760
August 31, 2008, 04:17 AM
I feel bad for those in NO. If this storm makes landfall
there it is going to be a nightmare. We have been through too many of these here in Florida. Someone said most of THR members would not need to run out right before a hurricane for ammo and such; I know we are prepared. Godspeed to those in Gustav's path.

Nematocyst
August 31, 2008, 04:21 AM
Gustav could very well be a monster. (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/7590332.stm)

All the ammo won't protect you
as your house disappears.

If you live in coastal LA,
just get out, now,
& carry the guns.

Don't be stupid.

Zip7
August 31, 2008, 09:05 AM
I can't imagine why anybody would want to live on a bullseye like that.

So you can have cheap gas, coffee and bananas in Colorado.

And good shrimp.

My employer really wants me to move to CO, but I'm resisting. This is my home, and I love living here.

That said, there are plenty of places in NO where I wouldn't buy property because of hurricane flooding - like most of it. Some parts of the city will always be ok, but they are out of my price range for the most part. So I live outside of town - way north.

SCKimberFan
August 31, 2008, 09:12 AM
If the federal government would get out of the business of insuring coastal properties, people would quit building there.

If your city is below sea level, what do really expect to happen?

Starship1st
August 31, 2008, 09:15 AM
The government is warning people to get out now and not stay behind. They say that if you stay you are on your own. :cool:

Hardware
August 31, 2008, 09:15 AM
Move the people out, rename New Orleans the Lake Pontchartrain extension and be done with it.

I might be at the gun store to buy more ammo. You can never have enough. But if there was a crowd I could just as easily shrug my shoulders and get by with what I have on hand.

JWarren
August 31, 2008, 09:21 AM
Move the people out, rename New Orleans the Lake Pontchartrain extension and be done with it.


Like in Katrina, it may be worth mentioning that this thing is going to hit a lot more than New Olreans.

-- John

Zip7
August 31, 2008, 09:37 AM
If the federal government would get out of the business of insuring coastal properties, people would quit building there.

The government caused a great many of the flooding problems with levees on the river and ship channels below NO. Destroyed a lot of the barrier marsh S. Louisiana used to have.

As JWarren said, this will affect more people who live outside of NO. People whose family have lived on their place for 100+ years - south of Houma, these folks could lose everything they have. It's pretty cavalier for people to say... "well they should have known better than to live there."

These are good, hardworking people too, not the few idiots you see in the city looting and whatnot. Largely, they live where they do because YOU like to eat seafood or buy petroleum products.

Lashlarue
August 31, 2008, 10:11 AM
I got my info yesterday on a nationally televised newcast with Ray Nagin the principle speaker. No one will be allowedto remain in their home, it is recommended that those able leave town , those who can't will be assigned to shelters that are considered safe and above sea level.Anyone else found out and about will be considered a looter and treated as such...

orionengnr
August 31, 2008, 11:58 AM
The FBI collects those inquiries on a statewide basis, so no data for the New Orleans area was available. This month, there have been 16,968 inquiries throughout the state, compared with 17,062 for August 2007.


That's a month's purchases for the entire state?

That looks like one weekend at the Dallas Market Hall Gun Show :)

Treo
August 31, 2008, 12:04 PM
So you can have cheap gas, coffee and bananas in Colorado.

And good shrimp.

Largely, they live where they do because YOU like to eat seafood or buy petroleum products.

So people choose to live in NO out of an altruistic desire to serve their fellow man, not buying it.


I got my info yesterday on a nationally televised newcast with Ray Nagin the principle speaker. No one will be allowedto remain in their home

There ya have it. as long as that man was in office and as long as the N.O.P.D was as corrupt as they are there's no incentive in this world that could get me to live in that city.

To bring this back on topic , what do those of you who live in N.O. plan to do W/ your guns when they force you to evacuate?

JWarren
August 31, 2008, 12:12 PM
The comments of "why live in a certain place?" are asinine.

When I was living in FL, half the state was on fire, and the whole state was experiencing a major drought. Every year, it seems, CA and other parts of the West are burning to the ground. Other places have other problems.

My family has been in this area since before 1800. Some do not understand heritage or roots, and I can empathize with that. But others of us are deeply connected to our homes and our heritage. Some of us have our financial futures tied to long-standing family businesses. It's not quite so simple as just packing up and leaving.


-- John

Zip7
August 31, 2008, 12:30 PM
So people choose to live in NO out of an altruistic desire to serve their fellow man, not buying it.

Smart guy - they live there because there is an economic incentive to serve their fellow man. They don't give seafood and petroleum products away...

davidjblythe
August 31, 2008, 12:42 PM
Do any of you think there will be another 'gun grab' after the hurricane hits? If I recall correctly, the mayor did say that even though it was illegal, he would do it again.

Zip7
August 31, 2008, 01:02 PM
They haven't mentioned anything about guns on the news.

I'm sure they do NOT want armed thugs and/or mall ninjas roaming the streets after the storm - I don't either.

My guns won't be grabbed, as they will be packed away for the most part, and there won't be any door to door evacuations after the fact here.

They did mention that anyone caught looting will be hauled immediately to Angola, and believe me the potential looters know what Angola is, and they do NOT want to go there.

yokel
August 31, 2008, 01:04 PM
When he's da mayor, all bets are off...

Treo
August 31, 2008, 02:02 PM
Do any of you think there will be another 'gun grab' after the hurricane hits?

Given the anti gun reputation of the N.O.P.D I'd bet on it. But I keep hearing that evacuations are mandatory so , in theory there shouldn't be anyone there.

Wild Deuce
August 31, 2008, 03:48 PM
I did read somewhere earlier in a news report (might even have been quoting the mayor) concerning mandatory evacuations that if you are on your own property, they will not touch you. If you are not, you are subject to arrest. If that is true, somebody might have taken the time to educate "those in charge" about the Constitution since the last hurricane ... stuff like property rights, civil rights, personal repsonsibility (consequences of staying/leaving), etc.

I'll look for the link.

alligator94
August 31, 2008, 03:48 PM
I thought a mandatory evacuation just meant you were on your own? Does it mean that they can physically remove you against your will?

Happiness Is A Warm Gun
August 31, 2008, 04:46 PM
I thought a mandatory evacuation just meant you were on your own? Does it mean that they can physically remove you against your will?

On the news they were talking how strict the the evacuation order is
1) anyone remaining behind will have no access to emergency services. Don't call police, fire, ambulance there will not be anyone.
2) any personal property can be apropriated to assist in the evacuation.
3) anyone on the streets can be detained at will on the suspicion of looting. they will be detained w/o bond until the emergency is over.

So likely they won't go door to door looking for you (simply because they don't have the manpower) but you will truly be on your own. Even leaving your house could result in your detention until the storm is over.

If it were me I would leave and I have rode out multiple hurricaines in VA and NC. Sometimes discretion is the better part of valor.

Devonai
August 31, 2008, 05:05 PM
Another large number of people fail to plan ahead for entirely predictable risks. Anyone who did wouldn't have reason to buy more guns or ammo a day before the hurricane hits. I'll bet most THR members wouldn't have any need to do so.

I don't shoot my 870 that often, but I like to keep 100 rounds of buckshot and 50 rounds of slugs on hand for defensive purposes. I don't see any problem in going to the store to stock up on more ammo if there's trouble ahead. I think this criticism is best reserved for those that never set foot in the store in the first place.

crotalus01
August 31, 2008, 05:06 PM
So I assume they are going to declare Martial Law? That i the only condition I am aware of in which a US Citizen can legally be detained for no reason...

TexasRifleman
August 31, 2008, 05:12 PM
That i the only condition I am aware of in which a US Citizen can legally be detained for no reason...

It's not for "no reason", it's for violation of the curfew city ordinance.

Curfews have been held to be legal for short term stuff like this, so it's the law. Break the law...get arrested and get charged with at least, I'm guessing, a misdemeanor for violation of the curfew. Doubt it's a felony but who knows.

insidious_calm
August 31, 2008, 05:39 PM
Unless the state laws have changed since Katrina then the Mayor (Nagin) doesn't have the authority to declare martial law as that power is reserved to the governor only. Someone should really be talking to these JBTs too, I suspect things are likely to be drastically different from the free reign of abuse they had last time. Door kickers and gun stealers will likely be KOS. Pratice your jack boot thuggery at your own peril. A wave of new laws were passed nationwide in response to what took place in NOLA after Katrina. I guess we'll see just how serious the politicians were about it now. My advice to those in official capacity in NOLA: Tread lightly, the citizenry camel is struggling, one more straw just might be the one.

I do hope that the majority of those there will evacuate. I have no doubt though there will be some who are indeed prepared and capable of weathering this storm in place. I respect that it is their right to do so and to do so unmolested by corrupt NOLA police or out of town JBTs from Kali. I am also sure that there will be those who try to do it unprepared or who are not as prepared as they thought they were. Likewise, I respect their right to suffer the consequences of their decision unmolested. This is really not a hard concept to grasp. Let's hope the Naganites can figure it out.


I.C.

elrod
August 31, 2008, 05:39 PM
Like in Katrina, it may be worth mentioning that this thing is going to hit a lot more than New Orleans.

Yes it is, but unfortunately the people of New Orleans haven't grown up and learned to handle adversity near as well as the self-sufficent peoples in the path of the storm. There was a mention on the TV news of evacuating the people living in FEMA trailers before the storm arrived. FEMA trailers? Three years later?
I only hope Jindal forces Nagan to put on his big-boy drawers this time around and do the right things. Such as forcing government-dependant peoples to evacuate and allowing those capable of taking care of themselves to do so, by whatever legal means they choose.

ants
August 31, 2008, 06:02 PM
I certainly hope not, but in New Orleans the mayor issued a statement today:
The mayor Sunday pleaded with the last of its residents to get out, imposed a dusk-to-dawn curfew on those who stay and warned looters they will be sent directly to prison.
To send violators directly to prison without trial implies suspension of Due Process. Of course, this bravado statement could be in the spririt of trying to instill fear into looters and thugs. But I'm bothered by the suspension of due process, guaranteed by the Bill of Rights, by a city official who violated the 2nd Amendment in the Bill of Rights after the last hurricane.

JWarren
August 31, 2008, 06:09 PM
ants,

Nagin says a lot of things. He either is not concerned with the implications of what he says or he is simply too ignorant to realize it.

Oh, he may well try it. And the results won't be pretty.

My point is that this isn't the first time he makes it up as he goes.


-- John

22-rimfire
August 31, 2008, 06:45 PM
Nagin is an idiot. I guess the people of NO got what they deserve (or at least the majority).

I understand that mandatory evacuations mean you are supposed to leave. IF you stay and are out on the street, I suspect you will be disrespected by the police. Carrying a firearm is probably out of the question. They also saying "you're on your own if you stay." No police, no access to medical care and possibly no utilities if they go out.

TexasRifleman
August 31, 2008, 06:48 PM
I understand that mandatory evacuations mean you are supposed to leave.

The legal guys on Fox explained it that you could stay only if you stayed on your own property and you agreed by your staying that you would have no access to public services like police and fire. If you are outside your private property you are subject to arrest for violating the curfew ordinance.

What Nagin says isn't as important as what actually happens over the next few days. He clearly has diarrhea of the mouth.

feedthehogs
August 31, 2008, 08:44 PM
The mayor has shown no concern for the constitution and law in the past, why should he start now.

You can bet that there will still be looting and that the Gov't and FEMA will be blamed somehow for leaving people behind.

After all the sheep always look to the shepard for protection.

jkingrph
August 31, 2008, 09:17 PM
Nagin cannot send anyone directly to Angola or any other prison. He is a mayor not a judge. Looters may be detained until arraigned and charged, and possibly held over for trial.. That said there may be some recent agreement whereby looters can be sent there until due process can start. Do a few and once word gets out looting will be less. Again, he is mayor and cannot as such sentence anyone under any circumstances to jail or fines.

txgho1911
August 31, 2008, 09:19 PM
Several choices for local streaming news.
http://www.nolaradio.com/

Several roads like the causeway are being shut down and sandbagged as they are weak points in the levy system.

akodo
August 31, 2008, 09:35 PM
Anyone who did wouldn't have reason to buy more guns or ammo a day before the hurricane hits. I'll bet most THR members wouldn't have any need to do so.

I can definately imagine someone looking at the single shotgun they have and the box and a 1/2 of shells and thinking...a handgun wouldn't be bad. Or the guy pulling the snubbie out of his sock drawer with 3/4 box full thinking...this looks pretty small.

I can also imagine the guy with an SKS, 2 glock 19s, and an 870 express thinking "too much ammo is much better than not enough...I should go pick up some more batteries, fill the tank, and swing by the gunstore to flesh out my stash"

TexasRifleman
August 31, 2008, 09:37 PM
Nagin cannot send anyone directly to Angola or any other prison. He is a mayor not a judge. Looters may be detained until arraigned and charged, and possibly held over for trial.. That said there may be some recent agreement whereby looters can be sent there until due process can start

I'm watching a video stream from the New Orleans Fox station and it appears that's exactly what is in place; temporary holding at Angola prison since the NO jail is closed.

akodo
August 31, 2008, 09:39 PM
Nagin cannot send anyone directly to Angola or any other prison. He is a mayor not a judge. Looters may be detained until arraigned and charged, and possibly held over for trial.

it is quite possible that all people arrested and waiting arraingment or trial will be held in Angola rather than the local police jail cells (which may fill with water)

CSA 357
August 31, 2008, 10:02 PM
Gun Sales Up? You Would Think Boat Sales Would Be Up! If I Was Gona Stay And Hold Down The Fort, Guns And A Boat Would Be High On My List, Food And Water, Might Be Weeks Before You Could Get Out , Man I Would Hate To Be There ! Good Luck To The Ones That Are, Csa

Gottahaveone
August 31, 2008, 10:08 PM
it is quite possible that all people arrested and waiting arraingment or trial will be held in Angola rather than the local police jail cells (which may fill with water)

Forget Angola, THAT ought to slow down some looters :evil:

SCKimberFan
August 31, 2008, 10:29 PM
Nagin says a lot of things. He either is not concerned with the implications of what he says or he is simply too ignorant to realize it.

My money is on the latter.

DeerSlayer7600
August 31, 2008, 11:00 PM
and an avid hunter who was in to pick up a 12-gauge he dropped off for cleaning.

Who takes a gun to a gun store to be cleaned, it's not that hard to do it yourself.

Treo
August 31, 2008, 11:08 PM
Who takes a gun to a gin store to be cleaned, is not that hard to do it yourself

Maybe the Gin store had good gin, in which case you probably wouldn't be able to clean it your self .

On a serious tip Chocolate Ray has made his stand pretty clear. If I was stuck in N.O. I'd be more worried about the cops than the ( other) looters

dalepres
September 1, 2008, 01:49 AM
After Katrina, some police officers were spotted taking basic supplies from stores, and, in isolated cases, items that didn't appear necessary for survival.

Like televisions and Nikes, if I remember correctly. Appears, huh? Only a reporter could come up with a euphemism like that.

dalepres
September 1, 2008, 01:51 AM
Do any of you think there will be another 'gun grab' after the hurricane hits? If I recall correctly, the mayor did say that even though it was illegal, he would do it again.
It was illegal the first time. He didn't care then and he won't care now. And Ray Nagen didn't personally grab a single gun. And he won't have to this time; there will be plenty of willing gun grabbers if he gives the order.

Treo
September 1, 2008, 02:30 AM
I'm sorry if this offends any one, I don't generally look to the the police for protection so the idea that that wouldn't be available doesn't necessarily bother me. But when I start needing to worry about protection from the police, it's time to find someplace that isn't N.O. to live and live there.

yokel
September 1, 2008, 08:06 AM
A wave of new laws were passed nationwide in response to what took place in NOLA after Katrina. I guess we'll see just how serious the politicians were about it now.

In the end, we all know we cannot look to courts, police, and politicians to protect Second Amendment rights and the men and women who legally rely on it to defend themselves and their country.

peyton
September 1, 2008, 08:31 AM
In the legal section we have pictures from CNN where they confiscated handguns from the people riding the buses out of NOLO.

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