How do you resist the siren call of a new gun?


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MacTech
August 31, 2008, 05:32 PM
Since I've just gotten back into shooting, I'm still in the "newness/infatuation" stage, part of that stage means trips to my local gunshop, I'm just lucky/unlucky enough to live a mere 5 minutes away from the gunshop, and a 10 minute drive from my rod and gun club, we have 50 acres of land, and I also have a small .22 target range set up in the field bordering our woodlot

I can shoot my .22's on my home range as much as I'd like, but I prefer the more controlled environment of my R&G club

anyway, part of my "infatuation" stage consists of going to my local gunshop on a regular basis and looking for good deals (read; CHEAP) in their used guns, almost every week, I see a gun that I'd *LOVE* to have, and it takes a good deal of self-control to not lay down the plastic and take 'er home

I'm trying to pay off my bills first, and it's difficult to do if I'm adding expenses to the credit card or debit card, if I get every gun I want, I'l never get out from under the pile of bills, but dammit, I *WANT* a new gun, every week it seems

So, what I've been doing is being brutally honest with myself;

"Self, considering that all you are using your firearms for is target shooting/plinking and varminting, what does <insert gun I want> do that your other guns don't, considering all you use them for is punching paper targets..."

"Self, do you *really* want to stock yet another type of ammo? I thought you wanted to keep things simple and limit the types of ammo you have to store"

"Self, you're not yet accurate enough with your existing handgun, why do you want to get yet another handgun that will take practice time away from the one you have right now, shouldn't you get really, really good with your existing pistol first?"

"Self, do you really *NEED* more than one handgun, given all you do is punch paper with it, and do you want to have to deal with the additional expense of yet another ammo type, yes, a .357 wheelgun, or .45 ACP or 10mm semi would be loads of fun, and yes, you can shoot .45 ACP incredibly well, but do you want to stock an ammo that's twice as expensive as 9mm, just to punch paper with?"

"Self, you already have an accurate, powerful, soft recoiling, and incredibly reliable 9mm pistol, *WHY* do you need another one?"

"Yes, self, you already own 3,000+ rounds of .22LR, but do you *really* need a .22 handgun, even though you have enough ammo stocked to feed it, you're a good shot with your two carbine rifles, and you can only shoot one at a time (no John Woo style shooting here ;) ), do you really need a .22 handgun?"

"self, think of how much ammo you could buy with what you would spend on that gun you're drooling over, and think of how much better your accuracy would get spending it on ammo, rather than guns"

"Self, instead of looking at adding more guns to your collection, wouldn't it make more sense to get more magazines for the guns you already own?"

"Self, wouldn't it make more sense spending time getting more accurate with the guns you already own, rather then adding more guns to your collection?

"Self, remember these wise words;
"Be wary of the man with only one gun, he knows how to use it"
"you don't need a new gun, you need to use the gun you got"

So, how do you resist the siren call of new firearms?

On a side note, I always think it's kind of funny, whenever I go to my R&G club, with my Ruger 10/22, H&R single shot .22, and Taurus PT-99 AF 9mm, invariably there's some shooter in the next stall over shooting some ultra fancy, Übercustom 1911-chassis/Tactical Tupperware/Big-Bore Wheelgun/Black powder revolver or something, what invariably gains their attention is my lowly little H&R .22 single, every shooter that has tried it ends up with a huge grin on their face, it's just such a fun little gun

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SCKimberFan
August 31, 2008, 05:34 PM
I don't resist. I give in.

Resistance is futile.

Carl Levitian
August 31, 2008, 05:38 PM
I tell myself that I already have a couple good guns, and with care they should last me the rest of my life. I don't need another gun.

Works for me.

woo18
August 31, 2008, 05:41 PM
I try to stay away from anything gun related, including this website. So far, it has not worked. I am still buying stuff and visiting this website. Damn it. You may need to seek professional help. Or, talk to your wife about your urges.

Old Fuff
August 31, 2008, 05:42 PM
I don't resist. I give in.

I've been doing that for years - starting in the middle of the last century... :eek:

But at some point I had to start trading some of them back in. :(

Might say I work on the rotation system... :evil:

jnyork
August 31, 2008, 05:47 PM
Self, do you really *NEED* more than one handgun

Self keeps saying back to me: "Whatthehell does "NEED" have to do with it?:D

gidaeon
August 31, 2008, 05:58 PM
Okay, I'm taking the serious approach desired or not... Track all of your finances in a program like money or quicken or whatever.. Look up the category you put all your gun purchases in and view is as a pie chart. Be amazed in awe, or fear :eek: hehe keep a seperate category for range\ammo and be equally amazed.

If your married, compare that category to what you have 'invested' into your wife or kids.

Or set goals such as "I must genuinely, seriously, truly achieve XYZ before I can do ABC." Great motivation for loosing weight ect. if the goal is realistic. Stick to it. If in debt or putting on a charge you don't immediately pay off, make a firm rule that you cannot, will not spend money you do not have. Priorities. The future is a'comming whether we saved or not huh. You can't take it with you, but that goes for the guns too!

zoom6zoom
August 31, 2008, 06:00 PM
I don't resist. I give in.
This system works well for me, also.

SCKimberFan
August 31, 2008, 06:11 PM
I do want to echo what gidaeon said.

Even though I give in, I don't buy until I have the cash in hand. :D

LiquidTension
August 31, 2008, 06:13 PM
I didn't resist for a while. A pretty long while, considering I have only been able to purchase rifles for 10 years and handguns for seven. Now I have lots of cool guns and no money.

Now I just remind myself that I work for the state and therefore I am poor. Problem solved :(

rbernie
August 31, 2008, 06:13 PM
I justify it by claiming it to be a heirloom for one of The Spawn. :)

MacTech
August 31, 2008, 06:15 PM
I just found a sneaky way to "get more guns"....

I was talking with Dad this afternoon, he's in his early 80's and admits that his shooting times are behind him, even after I offered to let him use my 10/22 or H&R .22 Single.....

We got to talking about his gun collection, a folding .410 camp shotgun, an Ithaca lever-action single shot .22, a H&R single-shot 12-gauge, a Stevens .22 Target rifle (old hex-barrel falling-block) and one gun I never new he had, a lever action 44-40 plantation rifle

he remarked in an offhanded manner that he was dissapointed he could no longer shoot them, so I asked, if he wouldn't mind, if I could take one or two to the R&G club the next time I go, he responded that that would be fine, and he'd like to see them get some use

so, it looks like I just "unofficially" added these guns to my collection;
.410 Camp shotgun
H&R 12-gauge single
Stevens Target .22
Ithaca lever-action .22 Single
44-40 lever-action

Hmm, looks like a trip to KTP is in order tonight to pick up some 44-40 cartridges.....

Woohoo, gotta love "free" guns :)

Hopefully, I can see the following exchange taking place;

Me; Dad, would it be okay for me to take the Ithaca and/or the 44-40 to the range today?
Dad; Sure, just be careful with them
Me; I'll treat them like they were my own
I then proceed to put the 44/40 in a hard gun case, and the Ithaca in my soft padded case, go to the range and have fun, drive home, ask Dad for the cleaning kit for the 44-40, and Boresnake the .22, clean and polish them up, then hand them back to Dad to put them back in his display cabinet
Dad; (hands me the key to the gun cabinet) Here, take this, these guns should really see some use, feel free to shoot them whenever you'd like, just take care of them....

After all, he gave me his Parker VH a few years ago, and that beauty is still pristine

CHEVELLE427
August 31, 2008, 06:28 PM
I WILL HAVE TO STOP someday :what:
but not quite there yet.:cool:

now when i go to the range it looks like IM running a resupply truck for our troops.:o
i try to get 5-7 hours at the range when i go (1-2 times a week)
ill stand in my gun room and try to make up my mind what guns to take out for stroll, seems they all want to come.:eek:

so yes IM a Gunoholic.;)

Starship1st
August 31, 2008, 06:28 PM
Yes you want to buy more guns. You need more guns! :D

MT GUNNY
August 31, 2008, 06:33 PM
If you can hold out till the next, you've done good.

tigre
August 31, 2008, 06:41 PM
Mostly by looking at my paycheck and bank balance.

I'm new too, and I do think about what I want next, but I've acquired five guns in three months and have a few things I need for the ones I've got, like magazines, holsters, and a couple of alterations. Plus, I chose well on the ones I have and really like shooting them, so I don't want anything else crowding in just yet.

jdc1244
August 31, 2008, 06:56 PM
I’m a windfall gun junkie – tax return, rebate check, bonus, mortgage escrow refund, various other refunds – all end up buying guns.

Loomis
August 31, 2008, 06:58 PM
How do you resist the siren call of a new gun?

That's easy. Just mention to your significant other that you saw a (fill in the blank) gun the other day and it was really cool. You'll get a response that will help you resist.

Rugerlvr
August 31, 2008, 06:58 PM
I can't. As evidenced by my Thursday haul:

http://www.xmission.com/~jdjonsson/images/newrugers.jpg

BigBlock
August 31, 2008, 07:04 PM
Every time I want a gun I think "I'll just get something cheap that works nice". I always come home with something that costs more than $500. :banghead: A gun habbit is worse than a crack habbit.

wrc
August 31, 2008, 08:01 PM
I budget for guns and other interests. Heck, if you go by the mantra of "pay yourself (savings), pay the bills, buy fun stuff", you'll probably be okay as well.

Budgeting is fun for me, I can look at something and tell myself "If I just wait two more months, I can afford ______".

Of course, guns, unlike many other objects in which we might pursue our leisure, seem to hold a decent value. Doubly so if you try to buy used =).

machinisttx
August 31, 2008, 08:04 PM
How do you resist the siren call of a new gun?

That's easy. Just mention to your significant other that you saw a (fill in the blank) gun the other day and it was really cool. You'll get a response that will help you resist.

My wife is actually the reason I have so many. She encourages the habit....

jkingrph
August 31, 2008, 08:07 PM
Basically I don't. Everything is paid for house, car, truck, all bills current paid in full, or scheduled. Son is finished with college and law school.

Bottom line is the Wife if I see something says, buy it, you work hard for your money, and we can afford it. So!!!

It's nice to reach that point in life.

onebigelf
August 31, 2008, 08:28 PM
It's possible to resist? Is it desirable?

John

Mainiac
August 31, 2008, 08:44 PM
I try the old Jedi mind trick.

"These are not the guns you'relooking for."

Hasn't worked yet but I'm still perfecting it.

TCB in TN
August 31, 2008, 08:47 PM
It is usually very easy, because a lack of funds usually stops things dead!

Hardtarget
August 31, 2008, 08:53 PM
I don't have to resist...I'm broke....there are no affordable guns right now. I can barely feed the ones I have. :D

Really, the last three were mil-surp and not very expensive. However, there are several new offerings I would like to see in my safe. Oh,no...its full. I also need another safe! bother.

Mark.

Treo
August 31, 2008, 08:53 PM
You exercise self disipline & stay away from the gun store unless you have cash

akodo
August 31, 2008, 08:56 PM
here's what you do. Give youself permission to buy ONE gun per set period of time.

Now, as you are limiting yourself to one gun, you need to spend time deciding which gun you want. List your other choices that are tempting for next time period. That way you aren't saying 'I'll never buy it' you are just saying 'not right now'

Once you selected the general type of gun (deer rifle, snubnose revolver for CCW) etc, you owe it to yourself to hunt down the best values. This is done by checking a bluebook of gun values, NOT by assuming the guns at the gunstore are well priced.

Once you realize the guns in the gunstore are at market price or a bit more, you won't be nearly as tempted, because you know at fair market price, you will have other chances at the same exact gun.

Doing this research will eat up time and allow you to wallow in your love for the evil baby killers you dispicable human being...and allow you to keep a budget of some sort.

ROMAK IV
August 31, 2008, 09:04 PM
Wow Mactech! Stay away from GunBroker! I new about it, but recently tried online layaway. If you put lawaway in search, you will get pages and pages of various guns, new, used, and rather exotic as well as antique. I have a Hakim and a Rasheed on layaway, Anyway, it is another method to be able to afford some guns that you normally wouldn't even been able to afford. But be careful!

Harry Paget Flashman
August 31, 2008, 09:58 PM
It is simple. If you already have one or two of the same model don't buy it. Or tie me to the mast, plug my ears with beeswax and put on the lyre CD and crank up the volume.

halfbreed808
August 31, 2008, 10:07 PM
AHHHHHH. So many guns, so little money. :mad:The yearning turns to a dull ache after about 4-6 months.:o But it's stillthere a year later and I'm only $100 away, YEEAAA!:D

TStorm
August 31, 2008, 10:48 PM
One-gun-a-month should only be self-imposed and based on a yearly average! :D

My advice stems from finding other allocations for your budget:

My first answer is to purchase a good safe. That will cut into at least two immediate firearm purchases, if not more. This is a very good investment. Make sure its big enough for many more firearm purchases. I've never heard anyone say "my safe is too big."

Second answer is to shoot often and get into reloading. I admit I haven't, but that's another way to get a similar return from your budget. Reloading equipment will be my next "safe-level" investment. I've got other projects I have to move out of my workshop prior to reloading.

Third answer is getting a gunsmith to work on what you have... sights, triggers, or other accessories. Sweet! :D

This is rather seductive isn't it.

ZeSpectre
August 31, 2008, 11:22 PM
I look at my paycheck after all of the must-do stuff is paid for.
That usually brings me to a halt.

Also, I ONLY pay cash otherwise a $600 gun somehow turns into a $850 gun by the time I've paid the damned plastic off. (Did that ONCE, will not repeat mistake!)

Majic
August 31, 2008, 11:41 PM
Just stay out of the gun stores. Why go shopping when you don't want to buy?

hankdatank1362
August 31, 2008, 11:59 PM
I've, stupidly, paid for more than one gun on a credit card.

I think I'm still paying on a SIG.

I also buy guns when I get in a spoiled mood.

I was looking at a GSX-R 750 a couple months ago, and just couldn't justify that kind of expense. But darnit, I work hard, study hard, and provide for my family! I DESERVE a reward every now and again.

Bought a gun as my reward.

Heck, the way gas prices are now, I'd probably had been better off with the bike!

JWarren
September 1, 2008, 12:05 AM
While I have the money available, I am such a cheap SOB that I agonize over spending money on things.

So, I torture myself for a few weeks and then part with the money like I am going through childbirth.

And then I usually never regret the decision.


-- John

Kind of Blued
September 1, 2008, 12:12 AM
Use one of your existing guns to shoot a bunch of holes in your credit card.

stevelyn
September 1, 2008, 05:42 AM
How do you resist the siren call of a new gun?

I don't. I'm a gunhor. I get tangled up with whatever gets my attention.

yokel
September 1, 2008, 06:15 AM
Quite honestly, my place is now filled to repletion with more rifles, shotguns, carbines, and handguns than I know what to do with.

Ammunition stockpile management is the thing these days.

I'll be changing my tune if and when full-autos manufactured after May 19, 1986 become fair game.

robert garner
September 1, 2008, 07:13 AM
Re sis tance is Fu tile
What I have learned to do is when I get the urge to buy a gun,
I put it's money aside, repeat, repeat, then go and get a luger or
something equally unobtainium. Spending your gun money on the
best available according to you own lights is much better than
getting a coupla cheepo's!!!!
robert

Old School
September 1, 2008, 07:44 AM
Want more? Then make more money.

CHEVELLE427
September 1, 2008, 07:46 AM
I TRIED TO GET RID OF SOME LAST MONTH :eek:,

after all the selling and swapping was said and done i was up by 2.:neener:

berettaprofessor
September 1, 2008, 08:06 AM
:what:Do not take the advice to tell the wife!:what: Shrewd wives know that if they encourage your gun purchases, you'll still feel guilty enough to say yes to the next pair of shoes or shiny gold thing that catches their eye. The fiends.

Why resist anyway? Okay, okay, my purchases have slowed down, admittedly, but mainly because the initial urges got filled and because I only check Gunbroker once a week and only for specific more rare guns. Now I pay only cash and rationalize it as an investment; In response to another's suggestion, I do keep the gun inventory separately in Quicken and it's substantial, but the guns at least are maintaining resale value where my stocks and IRA's have lost money over the past few years.

Besides, I spend no money on boats, golf, nor fancy autos and I've passed middle age without taking a trophy mistress. A man's gotta have something to fondle and pass the time. :)

Waitone
September 1, 2008, 08:07 AM
Don't resist; give in . . . . but channel the drive. Walk over to your pile of bills and pick out the biggest honker you can find. Then clearly identify the your biggest object of lust. Link the two together. When you've paid off the biggest honker treat yourself to the purchase of <insert lust object>. Repeat as necessary until your bills are under your control. Then go buy a reloading rig and really start spending money. :D

Paying off bills is a serious downer but once you start it gets addictive.

GRB
September 1, 2008, 08:17 AM
I don't need to resist, I don't have much money to spend on guns. That is because I pay my mortggae, my homeowner's insurance, auto insurance, gasoline bills, heating oil bills, electric bills, natural gas bills, water bills, grocery bills, y son's college tuition and book bills, and every now and then even buy myself a pair of new socks.

Sure I buy a new gun now and again, Ijust recently ordered a Glock 26 from Glock (and I scrimped and saved for that one), but it is not hard to resist spending on guns what you do not have to spend on guns.

ranger335v
September 1, 2008, 08:20 AM
"How do you resist the siren call of a new gun? "

I just look at the balance in my check book.

Knowing what bills are outstanding, that is pretty well enough to stop any impulse purchases.

sprithitler
September 1, 2008, 08:29 AM
Move to a country where you cant just buy a gun and take it home the same day (due to firearms licencing bureaucracy), and where you cant own more than a certain (low) number of guns (due to "reasonable" restrictions on gun ownership), and where you cant buy whatever long gun you want (due to "reasonable" restriction on weapons of military origin, such as AR15, M1, Mosin Nagant etc), and where you can only get timelimited licences on handguns and only for targetshooting (due to "reasonable" restrictions on gun ownership) and where you cant buy any longarm until you have undergone a comprehensive huntingcourse ( due to hunting being the only "legitimate" use of firearms,). When you live in such a place it is quite easy to resist the sirencall of a new arm, you simply must plan your gunownership meticulously.

SCKimberFan
September 1, 2008, 08:33 AM
Time for a serious thought:

Move to a country where you cant just buy a gun and take it home the same day (due to firearms licencing bureaucracy), and where you cant own more than a certain (low) number of guns (due to "reasonable" restrictions on gun ownership), and where you cant buy whatever long gun you want (due to "reasonable" restriction on weapons of military origin, such as AR15, M1, Mosin Nagant etc), and where you can only get timelimited licences on handguns and only for targetshooting (due to "reasonable" restrictions on gun ownership) and where you cant buy any longarm until you have undergone a comprehensive huntingcourse ( due to hunting being the only "legitimate" use of firearms,). When you live in such a place it is quite easy to resist the sirencall of a new arm, you simply must plan your gunownership meticulously.

Remember this post when someone talks about reasonable gun laws. :fire:

OK. Back to your regularly scheduled frivolity.

HANDLOADER
September 1, 2008, 08:36 AM
Like the title says if you have the extra cash laying around take it and invest it into a gun you like. Another thing is try to leave the mind set of what do I need this gun for. You need it because you like it. It is what I have been telling myself for the past 10 years. HE HE. The wife dosent agree.


God Bless

Handloader

Vermont
September 1, 2008, 08:45 AM
If you are worried about your finances, use a credit card as little as possible. You don't want to be paying interest on a credit card bill. It is a little like throwing your money in the garbage.

I only use cash for gun purchases. That way I know I can afford it. I don't have a lot of disposable income, so this keeps me honest. I should still be saving more, but at least my bills (including my credit card) are paid in full each month.

It's not easy to resist, but you need to have self discipline when it comes to money. Even when you have millions you can lose it all if you buy stuff you can't afford.

Mike J
September 1, 2008, 09:03 AM
Right now it isn't too hard for me. I just look at what I've got coming in & what is going out. Wanted to get another pistol when I got my tax return/stimulus check money but wife talked me out of it. Thing is though I'm the sole support for my wife & kids & things have been uncertain work wise for the past few years. I want more guns/more calibers to play with but the kids come first.

rfurtkamp
September 1, 2008, 09:23 AM
Give in for a while. Then you'll end up with a bunch of fun toys, and if you buy well, losing money isn't likely to be an issue.

That said, at this point I'm pretty much done with gun buying, I'm down to one a yearish, partly because cheapies hold no allure after owning nice things - I sold the ones I had that I didn't like as collection pieces, range toys, or just 'it's neat'.

I'm happier at this point with one really, really nice piece every so often.

It's funny sometimes though, I end up with something I see on so many of the "if I could have anything" wish list threads from people who spent twice or three times what their desired toy is on surplus impulse buys and junkers.

What you want is obtainable, just figure out how.

Jaybird78
September 1, 2008, 09:44 AM
Why would you ever want to talk yourself out of a firearm?:evil:
Seriously, I've done the credit card thing and it's not fun. Save for next purchase. Hell, I got to the point I no longer go out "drinking with the boys" to fund my addiction.

Lashlarue
September 1, 2008, 10:33 AM
I just bought one had another in mind when my A/C went on the fritz. $900. Now I do imitations of Roy Orbison singing "Crying"

sharkhunter2018
September 1, 2008, 10:49 AM
I have to resist. I could stick a few more handguns in the back on the bottom somewhere, but NO more rifles. I am already three over capacity.

Obviously, the answer is buy another safe...but the cash isn't availible at the moment.

AndyC
September 1, 2008, 10:51 AM
I think of my wife making a handbag from my scrotum and that makes the desire go away :D

Seriously, we discuss stuff like this - we chat about any significant purchases beforehand so nobody gets grumpy; it's just a mutual respect-thing for us (I'm only batting 95% so far, though) ;)

Friendly, Don't Fire!
September 1, 2008, 10:58 AM
If you really want to have fun, learn how to reload and start reloading.

The only problem is that you could outlay a couple thousand dollars, by the time you buy all the equipment, bullets and/or brass for each cartridge you're loading, various powders, primers, and the bullets themselves.

The combinations and variations for each caliber are literally endless.

However, what you end up with (hopefully) is ammo that is anywhere from 25% to 50% less expensive than store-bought and if you are loading for accuracy, you will be loading ammo that is consistently tack-driving ammo.

I've been there with the credit card routine. I ended up closing the credit card accounts and will not (do not) open any more.

I try to be happy with the several guns I have (which are pretty decent guns, and which I load for -- all except shotgun, I never handloaded for shotgun).

MachIVshooter
September 1, 2008, 11:29 AM
Of course, guns, unlike many other objects in which we might pursue our leisure, seem to hold a decent value. Doubly so if you try to buy used =).

This is one of the things that makes it so easy to justify a gun purchase. If you know how to shop, a used gun can be resold for as much or more than what you paid for it.

Talking myself out of a gun is really easy if it's a current production model or an average priced used gun. Where I run into trouble is on smokin' deals or hard-to-find pieces.

ftierson
September 1, 2008, 11:32 AM
You're supposed to resist...?

I must have missed the memo...

:)

Forrest

Corporal K
September 1, 2008, 11:33 AM
I remind myself that early retirement is more important than a 15th gun.

Hot brass
September 1, 2008, 12:46 PM
Buy buy buy.

Iggy
September 1, 2008, 12:48 PM
No problem, no money.:D

yourang?
September 1, 2008, 01:12 PM
resistance is futile
you will be assimilated

RPCVYemen
September 1, 2008, 01:31 PM
I'm trying to pay off my bills first, and it's difficult to do if I'm adding expenses to the credit card or debit card, if I get every gun I want, I'l never get out from under the pile of bills, but dammit, I *WANT* a new gun, every week it seems

Don't buy any new gun until you are out of debt - buying a gun on a credit card bill (that you don't pay off at the end of the month) is a guaranteed way to get a very bad deal on a gun! Want to buy a $500 gun for $1000 - put it on a credit card and take your time paying it off!

Speaking from experience :), paying down credit card debt on stuff you can't even remember you bought really sucks. If you do it once, and really pay it down one painful payment at a time without trying to play any "re-financing" games, I can almost guarantee you won't run up a debt like that again. Everyone who I know who's played fancy games with credit cart debt (consolidating, line of equity against a home, re-fi car loan, etc) has run the debt up again within a year. The few folks I know who have paid off credit card debt at $150/month with no new expenditures have never run up credit card debt again - paying it off is that painful.

Since I know that computers and guns are my weakness, I don't ever buy either one on credit. Here are my two rules:


Never buy a gun on a credit card.
Never buy a gun until I have fully mastered the last one I bought. I don't understand the attraction of owning a safe full of weapons that I don't shoot regularly and shoot well.


To be honest, I did break rule #2 with my last patent award - I wanted to understand something about autos and bought an Armalite AR 24 when a patent was granted. My company gives us $2000 when a patent is granted, and I treat that more or less as funny money ($200 to charity, $900 for my wife to spend on something extravagant, $900 for me to spend on something extravagant).

Mike

RPCVYemen
September 1, 2008, 01:48 PM
This is one of the things that makes it so easy to justify a gun purchase. If you know how to shop, a used gun can be resold for as much or more than what you paid for it.

I am guessing this clearly not true if you buy guns with a credit card, or buy gun instead of paying down credit card (or other debt).

I think it's also much rarer to make money on used guns than folks think.

Here' s a thought experiment: If I buy a gun for $1000, and sell it 10 years later for $1400, have I made any money on the gun?

The answer (depending on when I bought and sold it) is that I have almost certainly lost somewhere between a little money and a lot of money on the transaction.

Mike

Zedo
September 1, 2008, 01:49 PM
If you figure it out, keep it to yourself. I don't want to know. :D

RPCVYemen
September 1, 2008, 01:53 PM
I remind myself that early retirement is more important than a 15th gun.

You nailed this one. Bragging rights for your gun collection or being able to go shooting every weekday morning for 10 years because you were able to retire 10 years earlier? Is that even a dilemma for anyone?

Mike

ASM826
September 1, 2008, 01:54 PM
What is this "resist" you speak of? I know it not.

MMCSRET
September 1, 2008, 02:02 PM
Why resist? In their own way they are a 401K, if managed properly!

ilcylic
September 1, 2008, 04:26 PM
How do you resist the siren call of a new gun?

Poorly.

22-rimfire
September 1, 2008, 04:59 PM
Resistance is futile.

But you do have to keep a level head and an eye on your wallet. Do what I say, and not what I do. :)

RPCVYemen
September 1, 2008, 06:03 PM
Why resist? In their own way they are a 401K, if managed properly!

More or less the same way a lottery ticket is a 401(k), if you managed properly - first you have to manage to buy the right one. :)

The risks associated with treating guns as investments blows my mind.

The legislative risks alone are mind boggling - the value of your "investment" can be blown by either less restrictive or more restrictive legislation. As an example of risk due to less restrictive legislation, talk to folks that bought "pre-ban" magazines a couple of years ago. While it seems very unlikely, if Heller or some subsequent decision were to force the opening of the Federal machine gun registry, what would that do the the value of a Uzi bought last year for investment purposes? As an example of the other extreme, I see no reason why a left-leaning legislature couldn't prohibit or excessively tax the sales of "assault weapons" - with some wacky definition of "assault weapon". The legislature might or might not grandfather in existing weapons. I can easily imagine a legislature permitting possession of existing weapons of some class, but not permitting the sale of those weapons.

I understand that there is legislative risk with most investments, but the legislative risk with guns strikes me as off the charts. For example, US government agriculture policy could have a big impact on corn futures - but the government is pretty darned unlikely to make sale/possession of corn illegal. :)

I think that there are also some pretty specific "age related" risks to our hobby. I think it's a crying shame, but I see a lot more gray hair at the gun range than I do body piercings. Speaking as an official "old geezer" - I turned 55 last Friday, I see a lot more old geezers at the range than I do young whippersnappers. Two things are true about old geezers:


Old geezers relatively affluent. Most economists will tell you that affluence generally is highly correlated with age in the US - at least until medical bills gobble it all up at the very end. In general, men 55 to 65 can afford more expensive toys than men 25 to 35 for example.
Old geezers die. Men who are 65 to 75 probably aren't going to be buying expensive toys for more than another couple of decades.


Since I don't see as many young people coming into our sport, that leads me to believe that the current value of weapons is pretty dependent on an aging affluent population that is dying off. That doesn't bode well for the future value of the toys that affluent population is currently buying. What that suggests to me is that the number of people willing and able to pay top dollar for investment grade guns is going to diminish pretty radically in the next 25 years. I could be wrong about that, but my observation is that the percent of the population under 30 who are hunting or serving in the military is much, much smaller than it was when I was growing up. I suspect that many folks currently involved in the shooting sports were introduced to weapons either as hunters or by military service - that just isn't happening any more.

Both of these risks suggest to me that "investing" in guns is extraordinarily risky - probably more risky than investing in works of art or oil wells.

It would be very interesting to have someone who understands finances/investing analyze investment in weapons. I will be the first to tell you that understanding the risks with any of more complicated bonds makes my head hurt, even though I think I understand many of the risks in stock investment. I suspect that the risks associated with investing in weapons (for civilian use) is much more complicated than for any of those financial instruments.

Mike

rfurtkamp
September 1, 2008, 07:20 PM
What that suggests to me is that the number of people willing and able to pay top dollar for investment grade guns is going to diminish pretty radically in the next 25 years. I could be wrong about that, but my observation is that the percent of the population under 30 who are hunting or serving in the military is much, much smaller than it was when I was growing up.


What I learned working in the industry for most of the last decade is that there are new buyers who are taking the place of the old men, as always, but they're not buying the same things.

The guns most old men deride are what they're buying - the pimped out ARs, pre-89-ban-era guns, higher end non-1911 pistols.

I expect many folks to take a bath eventually selling non-top-end militaria and high-end hunting rifles.

Today's shooter isn't necessarily a hunter, honestly - and it's more about handguns and plinkers than hipower competition rifles and bench rest shooting.

Yeah, some will come around to be interested in the same things and guns as the old men, but it's just not going to be in the same numbers.

I'd expect, for instance, that future collectibles could include original country of origin wondernines (Italian Berettas, W. German Sigs, etc), metal-era assault-type weapons, etc.

I should add that discussions with an extremely high-end collector here who is well above 80 have contributed a great deal to these conclusions - he and I share a passion for first-generation automatics and that's about it. I can respect the craftsmanship in some of the older weapons, but I'd have zero interest in his collection of drillings or Perazis even at a fraction of market value other than to own a gun that used to be his. Thankfully, he's also collected a substantial amount of modern weapons, and I own several of those I've purchased and can treasure as-is both for what they are and who they came from.

Rob62
September 1, 2008, 07:32 PM
A gun habit is much worse than a Crack Cocaine habit. :evil:

I can get a $5 or $10 rock anywhere, but I can't get a Bulk Pack of .22 LR for under $15 :neener:

revjen45
September 1, 2008, 07:38 PM
Poverty keeps me from buying more guns.

sm
September 1, 2008, 07:41 PM
Hey, I am over 50 years old, and therefore "qualify" for senior discount, according to Denny's anyway.

I might as well use other "senior" reasons too!

What siren? I didn't hear no siren...


*wink*

Chihuahua Floyd
September 1, 2008, 08:47 PM
I just don't carry that much cash.
Unless I saved it for a specific gun.

76shuvlinoff
September 1, 2008, 08:51 PM
I thought I had the auto feeding sidearm thing beat, then I fell in love with lever action rifles...... I know after that there'll be the need for a wheelgun to go with the levers......... there is no hope. :o

cliffy
September 1, 2008, 09:20 PM
I'm a spent-thrift and there's no denying that fact. At least I don't gamble-away money, but resisting the rifle I want seems impossible. I can wait; I can wish, but once I have it, it's merely another, often unnecessary, aquisition. Which caliber will I take to the range today? Or I'm going on a $1500 hunt today, so which rifle will I take? What have I bought for my wife lately that she really would appreciate? Yes, I only use a credit card for impulse purchases, but if my wife cannot pay it off when due, I deserve to be in trouble. I bought a $512 rifle scope last week, at the same time taxes were due for summer on our house ($1650). I'm not broad-minded or even sane sometimes. cliffy

ArmedBear
September 1, 2008, 09:24 PM
http://www.daveramsey.com/

Guy B. Meredith
September 1, 2008, 11:14 PM
I listen to the subtle scream coming from my wallet.

possum
September 2, 2008, 12:17 AM
How do you resist the siren call of a new gun?
tell my wife about it!:)

evan price
September 2, 2008, 01:28 AM
Easy: Stay away from places guns are sold.

Then you run into a FTF deal at the range...

Galen
September 2, 2008, 02:01 AM
Very easy.... no money. Really makes it hard as I refuse to use credit cards.

ColinthePilot
September 2, 2008, 02:58 AM
I only buy guns when I have the money in my account. I realize that if I blow all my money on guns, I won't have anything to protect them with because I'll get thrown out of my apartment.
I also just paid off my first credit mistake...I mean credit card from college. I used that card to make my first rifle purchase, and for 3 years, the bank owned that gun. Considering interest, I probably paid $450 for a Yugo SKS. Now I own all my guns, and I'm not going to pay double for a gun just to have it now.

contenderman
September 2, 2008, 10:52 AM
After many years of marriage I have developed something I consider to be a attribute ... "SHL" (Selective Hearing Loss).

Much like when the wife is giving me hell ... when the siren sounds and I don't want to answer I just mentally switch off the hearing. :evil:

Rem700SD
September 2, 2008, 11:55 AM
1) +1 to the Dave Ramsey.

2) Only buy guns with cash.

3) Only buy your next gun when the previous gun has 500 rds through it.

That slows down my gun purchases!

OOOXOOO
September 2, 2008, 12:13 PM
I feel your pain. I totaled up all of my purchases this year for shooting related materials and found if I'm lucky I can pay it all off by the end of the year.

bdickens
September 2, 2008, 12:30 PM
Easy. I don't have any money.

Griff
September 2, 2008, 09:59 PM
I read the reviews here, mostly. Vicarious lving. You guys have saved me some big bucks. Thanks

p2000sk
September 3, 2008, 12:07 AM
Save now, buy class 3 later.

rchernandez
September 3, 2008, 12:33 AM
Resist? Easy enough...no more room for yet another safe!

Just realized one of the safe's larger than the fridge ;)

MacTech
September 3, 2008, 09:18 PM
Strangely enough, I discovered my existing handgun (Taurus PT-99 AF) helps me resist the siren call of a new gun

I was in the gunshop tonight, looking around, looking for some good deals (pronounced "cheap") on some used firearms, I'd been reading up on the Makarov 9x18 and was interested, so I took a look at some pistols

Feg 9x19; gritty trigger, cheap magazine with a bare metal tab as a slide lock, smooth slide though, poor sights, safety gets in the way of pulling the slide back, no manual slide lock....pass
CZ 9x19; crisp trigger pull, smooth slide, a little beat up cosmetically, lock the slide back look down the bore with my SureFire A2 Aviator, what happened to the rifling, the barrel looks almost smoothbore!, pass....
Feg .380ACP; the same as the Mak, pass.....
Daewoo .380ACP; nice crisp double-action trigger, smooth slide, everything feels tight and well put together, lock the slide back, inspect the bore, rifling is 90% gone, pass....
Kel-Tec P-11; solid, well put together, slide could be smoother, absolutely horrendous DAO trigger pull, pass.....

My Taurus just fits me, it's comfortable to shoot, has a great trigger feel, whether SA or DA, holds 17+1 rounds (I'll soon be picking up a few Mec-Gar 20 rounders), balances well, has a nice, controllable recoil, a nice solid heft, and the balance does not change as the mag empties

the PT9X series has definitely spoiled me on other inexpensive guns, not one of the guns I looked at tonight could compete, ergonomically, comfortwise, or sight-picturewise with the Taurus PT99

James T Thomas
September 3, 2008, 09:29 PM
The old sea faring men used to lash themselves to the mast and would go crazy for awhile.

Then it would pass.

And like with Raiders of the Lost Arc; what ever you do, don't look!

Finally, any retail clerk can tell you, if you handle the merchandise, you're sold.

HGUNHNTR
September 4, 2008, 12:04 AM
I have gotten to the point where I can't find anything at a gunshop that I don't already have that I am willing to spend good money on.

Friendly, Don't Fire!
September 4, 2008, 07:19 PM
Another good idea is live in a place where the only gun store around sells nothing but a bunch of used junk.

You will walk in, browse around, and walk out without spending a dime!

doc2rn
September 4, 2008, 08:06 PM
Being a college student who has to budget himself, I stick to buying ammo for the ones I have. This keeps me happy and shooting.

Phydeaux642
September 4, 2008, 08:44 PM
Lately I haven't been resisting, but I have been trying to pick up guns that I feel are good deals and at the same time also feel that I could recover my investment or even make a little if I had to sell some of them. That seems to make me feel better about the rediculous amounts of money that I spend on the stuff.:evil:

tbtrout
September 4, 2008, 08:45 PM
Wife has access and knows how to shoot.

Quoheleth
September 4, 2008, 10:55 PM
I can add:
*Mortgage...
*2nd Mortgage...
*Wife's car...
*My car...
*Daycare...
*Electric...
*Phone/Internet...
*Medical bills...
*Student loans (16 more *years!*)
*Kid's class trip to DC & Boston...
and there isn't a whole lotta extra stuff. I'm saving my loose change for a Texas CCL - not out of the family budget, but the loose change I get & find.


I try to keep my perspective:
*One Federal Bulk Pack of .22 = 3 gallons of milk
*One 100-round bulk WWB .45ACP = 8 gallons of gas
Those aren't so bad, and as part of my recreation budget, I allow that occassional purchase.

But if you start talking guns:
*Used Smith M-10 = 4-wheel brake job on my car
*STI 1911 = repairing my septic line.

Keep things in perspective.

Q

Savage Shooter
September 4, 2008, 11:08 PM
Resistance is futile (corny robot voice here):D
I keep reading this NEED word What the :cuss: does that have to do with anything?
I MUST have them ALLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL!:evil:

lowercase
September 5, 2008, 12:52 AM
anyway, part of my "infatuation" stage consists of going to my local gunshop on a regular basis and looking for good deals (read; CHEAP) in their used guns, almost every week, I see a gun that I'd *LOVE* to have

Oh, lordy. If you like looking for CHEAP guns, don't go anywhere that sells Russian Mosin Nagant rifles. Those things are totally addictive. You can find them on sale sometimes for as low as 75 bucks! On the internet sites like J & G, they go for even less (before shipping).

That means that you can get a perfectly reliable rifle with cool history for less than the price of filling up a full-sized pickup. Needless to say, I already have seven of the things.:D

SCKimberFan
September 5, 2008, 07:49 AM
I just couldn't get that siren out of my head, so I gave in yesterday and put a CZ 75 Compact on layaway. It feels sooooo good to just let go.......:D

packnrat
September 5, 2008, 04:57 PM
i resist by not having any money in the bank from the last gun i bought.:eek:


:uhoh:

.

offroaddiver
September 5, 2008, 11:47 PM
I have just promised myself that I won't buy anything for a while. Then again I noticed something the other day. Oh yeah I do have a (insert caliber) gun that I haven't shot.

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