Lead Sled DFT?


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NetJunkie
September 8, 2008, 12:35 AM
Looking for opinions. I want to get a good shooting rest to use for sighting in optics. I want to take "me" out of the equation as much as possible. This a good choice or is it just mainly for reducing recoil on big bores? Other options? Bags are fine...but I'd like to get me out as much as I can.

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Jeff F
September 8, 2008, 07:05 AM
I can't speak of them as I have never used anything other then sand bags.

Horsemany
September 8, 2008, 08:59 AM
Get a good rest and a rear bag unless you're using a heavy recoiling rifle. I have a theory it's not good for wood stocks to make them absorb every ounce of recoil.

A traditional front rest and rear bag will be more precise as well. Lead sleads rear yoke does not fit a lot of older milsurp stocks either.

Sinclair makes excellent rests that feel like your gun's in a vise. I'd highly recommend one. THe cheap rests are not as good as a stack of sandbags IMO. It pays to get a good front rest.

ClayinAR
September 8, 2008, 09:03 AM
The lead sled works for me. Did it with sandbags for 40 years or so. Much quicker set up time, not as much stuff to carry to the range. When I first got mine I tried from both sandbags and the sled. Point of impact was the same.
That did it for me.
If you sight in several rifles it takes out the possibility of flinch.
I would hate to have to go back to the old way.
CC

C.F. Plinker
September 8, 2008, 11:54 AM
I got one when they first came out and much prefer it over the bags I was using. It has a good range of elevation adjustment but could use a little more windage adjustment. I get close with the front elevation adjustment, lock it in, adjust for windage, then use the rear screw adjustment for the final elevation. The two horizontal tubes are spaced far enough apart that an AR magazine fits between them.
I use the DFT for rifles with scopes or non-aperture iron sights. With aperture sights I have found that I want to get my cheek weld first and then keep my head in that position. For me this works best with the Caldwell Steady Rest or a similar rest because I can move my head and the rifle back and forward together for elevation changes.
Looking up and down the firing line to see what others use I see that the number of front rests and rear bags seems to be about the same as the number of sleds so, for me anyway, they seem to be equally popular.

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
September 8, 2008, 11:57 AM
The Caldwell lead sled is one of the best moneys you can spend on range equipment. It allows you to test the *equipment*, not yourself.

Having said that, after you test the equipment to see what accuracy it's capable of, you then also need to check it off sandbags for point of impact changes, since a gun recoiling into your shoulder creates different harmonics and a gun recoiling 98% into the lead sled only.

BruceRDucer
September 8, 2008, 01:08 PM
Got my Lead Sled.

We bought canvas at the fabric store, measured two pieces to 12" x 12" and sowed them together, leaving the top open.

I took a Zip-Lock Bag, filled it with about five scoops of sand from Home Depot.

Put some Gorilla Glue at the top of the Ziplock, shut it, (taking the air out) and put it in the canvas bad and sewed it shut. I get about 8 or 9 pounds in each bag for a total of 40 pounds of weight. The bags fit nicely behind the tray of the sled.

It works. :)

NetJunkie
September 8, 2008, 02:18 PM
Thanks everyone. Great info. My main concern on the lead sled was whether it'll hold the rifle tight enough that I won't need to stabilize it. Is that OK?

rcmodel
September 8, 2008, 03:42 PM
no.

Unless you hold the rifle, it will not shoot to the same POI as it would held stationary in a LS, or other semi-fixed mount.

rcmodel

NetJunkie
September 8, 2008, 03:48 PM
Unless you hold the rifle, it will not shoot to the same POI as it would held stationary in a LS, or other semi-fixed mount.

So if I flinch this won't help, right?

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
September 8, 2008, 05:04 PM
rcmodel:

This statement:

Unless you hold the rifle, it will not shoot to the same POI as it would held stationary in a LS, or other semi-fixed mount.

is true. But it does NOT necessarily follow that the answer to "should I get a lead sled?" is:

no

as you said. As I said above, it is highly useful for *testing* your gear, to control variables when you're having a problem, to determine whether it's YOU, or whether it's one of the other components (the ammo or the equipment). Whether the hold and POI are the same as outside the sled, is immaterial to whether the hold is *consistent*, which is all you need to control the variable. And control it, it does. So it's used for *informational* purposes, not *sighting in* purposes. :)

As I said, you would not want to rely on the POI off the sled before hunting or other important use.

rcmodel
September 8, 2008, 05:08 PM
I didn't say No, he shouldn't get a lead-sled.

I said "no" to his question of: whether it'll hold the rifle tight enough that I won't need to stabilize it. Is that OK?

The answer is still, No!

rcmodel

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
September 8, 2008, 05:30 PM
Ahh, I see.... :)

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