Best Case Trimmer


PDA






roc1
September 8, 2008, 10:47 PM
Best Case Trimmer

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

What is the best case trimmer available without breaking the bank?I have heard of the Giraud but have heard it is expensive?I have used the lathe type but really do not like them.I use the Lee now it is ok but is slow.I have been told by a cousin who uses Dillon that the electric trimmer really does not work that well on 223.I would like to speed things up if I am going to load the 223 for my AR.Hand trimming is ok for other calibers but will be to slow for the 223.I load pistol on my Hornady Ap and my Dillon presses.I do not ever trim pistol so it is no problem.I will load the AR progressive instead of Single Stage like other calibers of rifle.
Thanks for your input in advance
roc1

If you enjoyed reading about "Best Case Trimmer" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
esheato
September 9, 2008, 02:05 AM
If you're trimming thousands, bite the bullet (ha!) and buy the Giraud.

Buy quality, and buy once. Youtube Giraud and you won't go back.

Ed

jmorris
September 9, 2008, 09:29 AM
I would like to speed things up if I am going to load the 223 for my AR.

If you are trimming 4000 the Dillon will take about 2.5 hours. It works great with .223. The Giraud is a great trimmer but not even close to the Dillon when it comes to speed.

dhg2
September 9, 2008, 09:37 AM
jmorris,

If you want cases deburred and chamfered, the Dillon isn't even close to a Giraud. If you want just blastin' ammo, then Dillon is perfect for that, but for match ammo, deburring and chamfering is a necessary step.

Doug Giraud
Giraud Tool Company

scrat
September 9, 2008, 11:18 AM
Giraud.
that thing is crazy. what ever you do dont try to do it by hand all day. i have one of the lee zip trims. works ok. i once tried to trim a few by hand an it takes for ever and does numbers on your hand

armoredman
September 9, 2008, 11:40 AM
The best one for ruining your fingers, cramping your hand muscles, and causing you to remeber swear words you thought were safely forgotten - the Lee hand trimmer! Even withthe wooden ball it is a medieval torture. I still use mine because i trim in very small batches, and I have no$ for the high speed/low drag versions. But if what you want is self inflicted pain, that's the best!

callgood
September 9, 2008, 12:27 PM
I could have paid for at least half of my Giraud with all the gizmos I've tried.

They've ranged from Wilson/Sinclair (beautifully constructed but slow) to a Forster product for use on a drill press (total botch).

If you ever order a few thousand once-fired from brassman, etc., and imagine working your way through that pile with a dinky tool, you'll probably bite the bullet and buy a Giraud, or give up and buy some Wolf.:D

I haven't tried the Gracey trimmer, so I can only pass on those who have tried both tend to give the nod to the Giraud.

For high volume reloaders, this is one of those instances where "Buy once, cry once" is appropriate.

scratcherky
September 9, 2008, 01:18 PM
I use the Lee trimmer chucked in my lath.

scrat
September 9, 2008, 01:43 PM
done that too. put it in my drill press.

Friendly, Don't Fire!
September 9, 2008, 01:44 PM
I've always used a Forster trimmer.

Never a problem. Quality workmanship and won't break the bank.

With that being said, you may have to buy a certain trimmer for a certain length cartridge and use another collet holder for other cartridges.

For example, I needed a different collet holder for my S&W 500 Magnum cases than the collet holder I was using for .223. Since I had to do this anyway, I also purchased the longer trimmer so I could have two set up at my loading bench (short & long) and just use the appropiate collet setup.

So, for two completely different cases, I might have a total of about $180 into the trimmer bases, two collet holders, two collets and two pilots. Any more that I need to buy for different calibers would just be collets and/or pilots. The collets are each good for several different case sizes, and of course the pilot for a .223 would be good for all .22 high power rifle cases (as far as I know).

The collet holds the base and clamps it tight. The pilot goes into the mouth of the case to center the trimer while you activate the manual knob in a cranking fashion.

In several evenings, at about an hour a session, I went through 500 .223 cases and, about the same amount of time for 500 500 magnum cases.

jmorris
September 9, 2008, 03:27 PM
jmorris,

If you want cases deburred and chamfered, the Dillon isn't even close to a Giraud. If you want just blastin' ammo, then Dillon is perfect for that, but for match ammo, deburring and chamfering is a necessary step.


per OP
I would like to speed things up if I am going to load the 223 for my AR.

Again, your tool is a great product, just not as fast as the Dillon. FWTW if you are getting burs with the Dillon it's time to index the carbide cutter.

Jayman
September 9, 2008, 04:35 PM
I tried a lathe type trimmer and it drove me out to go buy a Giraud. I did 800 pieces of brass last night while watching TV. Try that with any other trimmer. :)

PecosRiverM
September 9, 2008, 06:23 PM
I've got a question on this subject also.

My Dad needs a trimmer that will fit a 300 Ultra Mag case. His present one is too short.

Friendly, Don't Fire!
September 9, 2008, 06:36 PM
PecosRiver

What brand is your dad's trimmer.

It may be that he just needs a longer base. If it's a Forster, I know there are a couple of screw holes in the collet holder and I think also in the cutting tool handle holder.

It may be, if you remove those two parts, that you might have extra holes to put a bit of a wider separation between them.

I would go to the web site for your father's trimmer and see what they recommend for his cartridge. Just about all web sites have all the technical information on them, the only other question would be if you have dial-up:banghead: or a high speed connection:):D.

With dial-up:cuss:, I wouldn't want to be browsing a site, trying to get a list together of all the different parts you might need:(, for example, making a big shopping list on MidwayUSA.

Friendly, Don't Fire!
September 9, 2008, 06:46 PM
Well, I read it enough here, I had to look it up.
I guess that is a quality trimmer! You can see the quality!

Actually, I didn't know such a good trimmer existed.

That being said, I don't think with how little I reload I'm ready to shell (sic) out almost $400.

Now, back about 15 years ago, I used to reload a lot of 44 and 357 and had an RCBS progressive press. Once set up, with the powder measure and cases all trimmed, cleaned and ready to go, I could literally load 600 rounds per hour.

I wish I would have had the Giraud Trimmer back then!

We had an indoor range and would shoot 600 rounds some evenings between two people!

1858
September 9, 2008, 06:55 PM
A few months ago I bought an RCBS Trim Pro from MidwayUSA (http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=481398&t=11082005) but haven't used it yet. I also bought two RCBS Trim Pro 3-way cutters (http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=251948) in .30 and .22 calibers but haven't used those either. That Giraud case trimmer looks like a well made, well thought out piece of equipment though.

:)

roc1
September 9, 2008, 07:40 PM
DHG2 what is the link to your trimmer?
Thanks
roc1

PecosRiverM
September 9, 2008, 07:54 PM
What brand is your dad's trimmer.

It may be that he just needs a longer base. If it's a Forster, I know there are a couple of screw holes in the collet holder and I think also in the cutting tool handle holder.


Thanks I called him and that's the one he's got (it's so old I guess it's the orig. and we need to order the longer base.)

Thanks for your help

dhg2
September 9, 2008, 08:01 PM
My webiste is www.giraudtool.com. From there you can navigate to the trimmer page and find all the info you need. At the bottom of the page is a link to the instruction manual in .pdf format. Feel free to download a read at your leisure.

Thanks,
Doug Giraud
Giraud Tool Company

mgregg85
September 9, 2008, 08:03 PM
I use an RCBS manual trim pro. Works great, nicest piece of reloading equipment I own so far.

BamBam-31
September 9, 2008, 08:10 PM
It's always a big +1 in my book when the owner/designer of said product stands behind his products on gunboards. :)

I'm gonna gets me a Giraud trimmer, even if I gotta sell lemonade on a sidewalk for a week!

trickyasafox
September 9, 2008, 08:56 PM
I always thought a giraurd would be way too far out of my league for price- but I broke down and got one.

I'd never go back
I won't recommend anything else.

If you want speed and awesome quality- its worth the pennies.

jmorris
September 9, 2008, 10:03 PM
DHG2,

http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=310116

the OP also asked the same question at the link above.

Bullet
September 10, 2008, 01:54 AM
Another vote for the Giraud trimmer, but it’s not just a trimmer it also deburrs and chamfers at the same time. It works great!!! I load 223 for my AR-15 and there are two things I use that I recommend, a Giraud trimmer and a (Dillon Super Swage 600 if your primers are crimped).

dogcatcher101
September 10, 2008, 11:07 AM
+1 giraud

elChupacabra!
September 10, 2008, 12:56 PM
Well, the Giraud trimmer looks great, but honestly it was out of my price range, so I started with the Lee trimmer system and the brass chucked into a cordless drill. That worked ok for small batches (50 or less at a time), but was very slow and frustrating to me when the brass would catch on the cutter and stop rotating with the chuck - that made me CRAZY. So I asked what a better way to do it was, and got great advice from rcmodel - chuck the cutter and length gague into a drill press, set the brass on the iron table and just drop the cutter into the brass which you hold in your fingers (gloves are a good idea for this).

I didn't have a drill press, and was leery of spending TOO much money, but lo and behold, Harbor Freight has 5 speed bench drill presses on sale until 9/22/08 - $49.99! So i picked one up yesterday, got it assembled, chucked my cutter and length gague in there, and tried it out on 5 pieces of scrap brass - it was a beautiful thing. I did all 5 in less than a minute, and it was taking me about a minute per each to do it the other way (cordless drill).

Tonight I'm going to do 150 pieces, then quickly chamfer and debur them by hand (don't yet have the Possum Hollow Power Adapter to chuck my RCBS chamfer / debur tool into the press) and (hopefully) have a much better experience than I have been having.

So for those keeping score, the price is -

$50 - drill press
$4 - lee case length gague (223) and shellholder (which you won't need)
$5 - lee case trimmer cutter and lock stud (won't need the lock stud, either)

That's less than $60 bucks for a very efficient, foolproof system... I'm sure it's not nearly as good as the Giruad, but you can also switch out for any other caliber Lee makes a case length gague for for an additional $4 bucks per each, AND you have your first drill press which will (surely) come in useful someday for something other than trimming brass :)

To me, that's a fantastic solution to an irritating problem that might not warrant a $400 capital outlay, if your situation is like mine.

Sport45
September 11, 2008, 12:33 AM
Just keep in mind that you still need to de-burr the brass after trimmiing.

I chuck the Lee shellholder in a drill thats clamped in my bench vice. While the case is spinning I trim (lee trimmer with vice-grip handle), chamfer inside and out (Lee chamfer tool), and polish (steel wool or Scotchbrite).

I've used a Giraud to go through several hundred .223 and really liked it. But now I only trim 50 or so at a time so the above method works for me. It is also more adaptable to different cartridges.

jhansman
September 11, 2008, 12:43 AM
For bulk trimming, I favor the Possum Hollow product. Coupled with the power adapter chucked in a hand drill, you can get a lot of brass trimmed. The adapter will also take the Lyman or Forster deburring tool, so those steps can be automated as well.

jmorris
September 11, 2008, 09:09 AM
Just keep in mind that you still need to de-burr the brass after trimmiing.


I have loaded buckets of .223 without any de-burr (I only shoot jacketed rifle bullets). I size and trim on a 650 the run through another size die on station 2 of a 1050 then again with the expander on station 3. No problems and with sorted brass sub moa accuracy.

ranger335v
September 11, 2008, 12:40 PM
"What is the best case trimmer available without breaking the bank?"

For those trimming less than a hundred rounds at a time, the Lyman "Universal" is perhaps the easiest and most versatile conventional trimmer to use. But simular units by Forster, Redding, Wilson, RCBS, etc. are good too.

For maybe two-three hundred rounds per session, a simple file trim die is the answer.

Trimming more that three hundred rounds at a time, at least very often, suggests using one of the powered trimmers.

Wilburt
September 13, 2008, 12:53 PM
I still love my Giraurd

If you enjoyed reading about "Best Case Trimmer" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!