Two-stage AR-15 Trigger - Any downside?


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ArmedBear
September 9, 2008, 02:10 PM
With an assemblage of parts lying about, the only thing keeping me from having two whole AR's is another LPK.

I'm thinking of getting a 2-stage for this lower.

The other has a standard Stag LPK in it, and frankly it works fine (a .22LR upper is a fun substitute for a trigger job -- it gets pretty smooth after a few thousand rounds:)). But I figure I might as well have my two lowers set up differently, so I can pick and choose.

Apart from the price difference, any reason to get a basic LPK and NOT to get, say, a RRA 2-stage?

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Creature
September 9, 2008, 02:18 PM
I bought a RRA 2-stage (for $88 shipped) for my AR...and I have never looked back.

RockyMtnTactical
September 9, 2008, 02:59 PM
What is the true purpose of this AR15?

ArmedBear
September 9, 2008, 03:04 PM
Most likely, this lower will end up with an A2 buttstock, under a 20" HBAR upper for target shooting, maybe some hunting, and the lower with the standard trigger will end up with an M4 buttstock, under a 16" carbine upper.

Might depend on what I end up liking.

Of course, building/shooting AR's in California takes a bit of finagling, so it's not so easy to borrow and try out 10 different ones to see what I like.

strat81
September 9, 2008, 05:04 PM
The common wisdom is that any deviation from the mil-spec trigger group reduces overall reliability.

For hunting and target shooting where it's not a life or death situation if you get light strikes, it's fine.

For a serious use rifle (duty, HD), I'd stick with mil-spec.

Some of this is also dependent on the type of ammo you use.

cliffy
September 9, 2008, 08:05 PM
As with all great trigger pulls, it should surprise you when it fires. It should fire with 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 pounds of finger force. It should be crisp, without dreaded creep. It should be single-stage, yet some people can actually adapt to two-stage triggers. 5 1/2 to 7 pound trigger pulls are ludicrius and pin-point accuracy total destroyers. Whether AR-15 or .223 Remington target model, PROPER trigger-pull is crucial to down-range accuracy. I've met up with too many heavy, sloppy trigers in my time, directly affecting my inherent accuracy. cliffy

Tarvis
September 9, 2008, 08:11 PM
I have very little 2 stage experience, but my buddies M1A Socom 16 has a really good 2 stage trigger in it that takes getting used to, but seems to work very well once you acclimate yourself. I'd say it's definitely not a hunting trigger, but good for targets and possibly squirrels.

Strat81 had some good thoughts, but I don't know if they really pertain to a 2 stage, specifically the RRA 2 stage. The springs are what will make you get a light strike and I don't know what spring setup the RRA 2 stager has, but most likely it is the standard trigger springs which can be swapped out for heavier or lighter springs.

For a serious use rifle (duty, HD), I'd stick with mil-spec.
+1.

mr.scott
September 9, 2008, 08:17 PM
I love my RRA trigger. All future builds will have the RRA match trigger.

Walkalong
September 9, 2008, 08:25 PM
I like the RRA 2 stage trigger. I put a 2 stage trigger in my AK. Nothing wrong with a GOOD single stage trigger.

taliv
September 9, 2008, 10:57 PM
simply put, the more screws and adjustments, the less reliable it is. Even so, it's mostly the "match" part and not the "two-stage" part that makes it less reliable. You can buy non-adjustable two-stage triggers (pretty reliable), and you can buy adjustable match single stage triggers (less reliable).


a hunting gun should NOT have a light trigger.




As with all great trigger pulls, it should surprise you when it fires. It should fire with 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 pounds of finger force.

The point of a two-stage trigger is that you can have most of the weight in the first stage and a lighter 2nd stage. that means a SAFE total overall weight, while still having a very light stage immediately preceding the 'bang'

here's what the USAMU says about surprises

To repeat, you want to be fast and smooth! This is not to be confused with slap, jerk, pull, snatch, command detonate, yank, squeeze and surprise break. If you are squeezing the trigger waiting for a surprise break, the only surprise you’re going to have is that it wasn't in the black when it went off.
http://www.odcmp.org/1207/default.asp?page=USAMU_TC
(granted, that may just be a gratuitous poke in the eye to long-standing USMC doctrine, but the point should be well-taken)

I don't really know what you mean by
It should be single-stage, yet some people can actually adapt to two-stage triggers.

cliffy
September 9, 2008, 11:19 PM
The first stage of a two-stage trigger takes up SLOP. then offers a Crisp second-stage if one is lucky. Americans, in general, are not used to European two-stage triggers. We, Americans, expect a crisp only-stage trigger-pull. We, do not require a first stage, unless we become forceably-adapted to such folly. What is the possible advantage to a five-pound-plus trigger pull? Stumbling in the woods with one's safety off, may be the only reason a stiff trigger might be adventageous. cliffy

W.E.G.
September 10, 2008, 12:15 AM
I bought a RRA 2-stage (for $88 shipped) for my AR...and I have never looked back.

They cost a LOT more than that now.

I have two RRA triggers.
Very beneficial for accuracy work.

browningguy
September 10, 2008, 12:29 AM
I have an RRA 2 stage match, a JP 2 stage, and two McCormicks, wouldn't have anything but a two stage in my target rifles.

Canuck-IL
September 10, 2008, 01:41 AM
There's still one vendor that sells them for $88.

A REALLY nice RRA 2-stage is one that has been prepped by White Oak. I have one of each, regular RRA and a WOA tuned and, yes, you can tell the difference with eyes closed.
/Bryan

Rokman
September 11, 2008, 12:39 PM
I have two ar's with the RRA two stage triggers and they have worked perfectly and much to my satisfaction for me. I am not very familiar with other triggers though.

VARifleman
September 11, 2008, 12:44 PM
The first stage of a two-stage trigger takes up SLOP. then offers a Crisp second-stage if one is lucky. Americans, in general, are not used to European two-stage triggers. We, Americans, expect a crisp only-stage trigger-pull. We, do not require a first stage, unless we become forceably-adapted to such folly. What is the possible advantage to a five-pound-plus trigger pull? Stumbling in the woods with one's safety off, may be the only reason a stiff trigger might be adventageous. cliffy
Folly!? I'm more accurate with a two stage than a single stage!

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