I-Bolts $325 NIB/$275 After Rebate


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JaxNovice
September 10, 2008, 02:00 PM
I was looking for an I-Bolt online today and found a vendor on auctionarms.com selling them for $325 NIB. I put in an order and I followed up with a phone call. I got the impression that they have many more in stock. In fact they have at least 4 more on auctionarms.com. Check out their feedback.

http://www.auctionarms.com/search/displayitem.cfm?itemnum=8796218



BTW- With the rebate from S&W you are getting them for $275

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TheDriver
September 10, 2008, 04:05 PM
This seems like a great deal. How do these stack up to the Savage/Stevens 200?

skinewmexico
September 10, 2008, 04:10 PM
Maybe Savages will quit selling, and they'll be forced to do rebates to move inventory. :neener:

JaxNovice
September 10, 2008, 04:36 PM
It is no suprise that S&Ws are going so cheap. Read their last earning release and they claim that shotguns and rifles are not selling worth a damn.

Dgreno
September 10, 2008, 04:59 PM
Tag for later

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
September 10, 2008, 05:33 PM
Finally! Priced at what the gun SHOULD BE priced at. Now it's in line with other plastic stocked turnbolts of similar quality (Mossberg, Stephens, new Marlin, Howa, etc.)**. They thought adding the S&W name should be worth about an extra $400 - it appears they were wrong. Competition is a bastage, ain't it, S&W? :evil:

P.S. The price is STILL a little high, considering they have the same PLASTIC swing swivel studs as the $244 Mossberg 100ATR, and othewise comparable quality. But to be fair, add $30 for the integral scope base, I guess.

skinewmexico
September 10, 2008, 05:57 PM
But to be fair, add $30 for the integral scope base, I guess.


Only fair if you like integral scope bases. Makes it kind of hard to put a 10-20 MOA base on it.

greyling22
September 10, 2008, 06:37 PM
I thought howa made a pretty good rifle. rebadged them for weatherby.

Shadowangel
September 10, 2008, 06:49 PM
They all 30.06?

JaxNovice
September 10, 2008, 07:34 PM
I think they have some in .270

Hoppy590
September 10, 2008, 08:27 PM
30-06 and .270 only it seems.

savage- stevens offers many more calibers

short action 223 REM, 22-250 REM, 243 WIN, 7MM-08 REM, 308 WIN

long action 25-06 REM, 270 WIN, 30-06 SPFLD 7MM REM MAG, 300 WIN MAG

my same opinion stands. Smith and Wesson just keeps stepping in it. they assume thier name brand will carry the sales, rather than the product and options

skoro
September 10, 2008, 09:47 PM
If I didn't already have a 30-06, I'd go for one of these. That's a very good price!

Der Verge
September 10, 2008, 09:53 PM
The I bolt is nothing but a complete ripoff of the Savage. I would not buy one for a few reasons. 1. I will not support thieves, and 2. I am sure the Savages still shoot better.

MAKster
September 10, 2008, 10:19 PM
If they have to cut the price by 50 percent in order to unload them, S&W must be about to discontinue them because of poor sales.

rangerruck
September 11, 2008, 02:46 AM
that is priced right, this is a well made rifle, unique bolt design, and track for removing, pillar bedded, forged reciever with forged scope mounts, bbl is made by t/c or green mountain i believe. I think maybe an adjustable trigger as well...I would get one, but allready have all those cals covered...

TheDriver
September 11, 2008, 02:46 PM
It is a T/C barrel.

foghornl
September 11, 2008, 02:51 PM
My Mossberg ATR-100 does all I want a .30-06 to do.

Plus, in the ATR-100 and 4x4 series, Mossberg has most of the popular calibres covered.

ImARugerFan
September 11, 2008, 03:10 PM
How's the trigger on these?

JaxNovice
September 11, 2008, 05:58 PM
I understand the trigger to be adjustable from the outside so it is easy to switch.

Dgreno
September 24, 2008, 05:06 PM
Has anyone actually ordered one of these and received it? What is your overall opinion? I just might get one...

Jim Watson
September 24, 2008, 06:01 PM
Pretty good net price for a hunting rifle. Don't try to make something out if it it isn't, there is not and will not be the support that Savage and Remington get. S&W never has been able to keep a long gun line going and this will be no different.

Wes Janson
September 24, 2008, 06:30 PM
One word: Fail.

I remember picking one up at SHOT and instantly going something like "Ugh". About as bad as the Mossberg, overall. When you consider that Tikka T3s can be had for under $500, I truly can't see why on earth anyone would ever buy an I-Bolt.

janobles14
September 24, 2008, 07:13 PM
i fondled one today. it seems fairly solid. the black stocks were $299 and the camo was $325 (both with $50 rebates). they also came with some cheapo scope which i could take or leave. overall for the everyday hunter i dont think they would be too bad. seemed well bedded and again...pretty solid.

oh yeah the barrels are made by thompson center factories.

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
September 24, 2008, 07:22 PM
One word: Fail.

I remember picking one up at SHOT and instantly going something like "Ugh". About as bad as the Mossberg, overall. When you consider that Tikka T3s can be had for under $500, I truly can't see why on earth anyone would ever buy an I-Bolt.

My thoughts exactly.

http://blogs.mysanantonio.com/weblogs/atlarge/epic_fail.jpg


pillar bedded, forged reciever, barrels made by T/C


Well, ok, it's has *something* going for it, but still, the original price was absurd. Now if they had created a market niche to try to compete head to head with the other value/economy turnbolts, they might have succeeded......

jordan1948
September 24, 2008, 07:51 PM
Introducing the new apple iBOLT rifle: featuring a complete automated system of networks that works with GPS and satellites to pinpoint exact locations of deer and if that's not enough it has 4 iWHEELS that carry it to the location of the deer and shoot it for you.

Also avalible the iGame Cleaning Kit, goes hand and had with the iBOLT rifle so work is virtually non-existent.


Sorry I just had to put that in here lol

MMCSRET
September 24, 2008, 08:06 PM
The continuing saga of Smith & Wesson and long gun sales. S&W has been in and out of the shotgun/rifle business at least 3 times in the last 40 years. Must be management change time again!!!!!!!!!!

Ash
September 24, 2008, 09:07 PM
Dude, that I bolt is a rip-off of a Mossberg 800.

Ash

Wes Janson
September 24, 2008, 11:14 PM
Introducing the new apple iBOLT rifle: featuring a complete automated system of networks that works with GPS and satellites to pinpoint exact locations of deer and if that's not enough it has 4 iWHEELS that carry it to the location of the deer and shoot it for you.

Also avalible the iGame Cleaning Kit, goes hand and had with the iBOLT rifle so work is virtually non-existent.

Lol. Now there's a product concept that would actually get them some sales...

SwampWolf
September 25, 2008, 04:18 PM
The I bolt is nothing but a complete ripoff of the Savage.

And where do you suppose Savage got the "idea" for their MAUSER-derived bolt-action design? "Ripoff" indeed !

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
September 25, 2008, 04:21 PM
Yeah, basically if you design a turnbolt gun and you're not Paul or Wilhelm Mauser, then you're a thief!

Ash
September 25, 2008, 06:04 PM
Except that the Savage has only three features found on any Mauser, and that is a non-split-bridge receiver, dual forward locking lugs, and an interior magazine. Most of these features aren't even exclusive to any Mauser nor were they created by Mauser.

Ash

SwampWolf
September 25, 2008, 07:33 PM
Well, those three "features" are the essence of any turnbolt rifle made today. Other than the design of the safety, an inferior extractor and a cheaper to manufacture method of controlling headspace, what does Savage offer that is unique to the Mauser bolt-action configuration? I'm not down on Savage (I have a 116SE model that I like very much) but to accuse Smith & Wesson of stealing a design copied by every major company today and for the past century borders on being preposterous.

Ash
September 25, 2008, 08:56 PM
None of those features are unique to the Mauser. In fact, most modern bolt-action rifles lack any feature unique to Mausers. The Marlin and Mossberg 100ATR's copy the Savage with the barrel nut, which is a true innovation that provides a level of consistency not available on any Mauser. The I-bolt has only two features in common with any Mauser, and those features are not unique to Mausers, either. The bolt has no feature common with the Mauser except for location of bolt handle.

I, for one, do not see how the I-bolt is a copy of the Savage. It rips more off from the Mossberg 800 than anything else.

Ash

SwampWolf
September 26, 2008, 06:18 AM
Almost all American-made turnbolts, past and present, are essentially modified Mausers and that includes the Savage 110. Quoting from the tome "Bolt Action Rifles", author Frank de Haas had this to say regarding the Savage 110: "...Aside from the several new features (see the aforementioned references to the three-position safety, the C-type spring-clip extractor and the simplified breeching system), the action is still a 'Mauser-type' having a bolt with forward dual-opposed locking lugs and a staggered-column box magazine."

Ash
September 26, 2008, 06:54 AM
You could have called the Savage "Carcano Type" because it has two forward opposed locking lugs and a round profile as well as a rotating extractor. You could call it "Enfield Type" because it comes with a five-round staggered detachable box magazine as invented by James Paris Lee and because the safety is located on the receiver and not the bolt. You could call the later (and current ones) Mosin-like because the Savage uses a detachable bolt head with dual-opposed forward locking lugs which lock into the receiver.

Just because Frank, rest his soul, called it a Mauser type action, does not make it one. His defining characteristics aren't even Mauser-created.

"'Mauser-type' having a bolt with forward dual-opposed locking lugs and a staggered-column box magazine."

Most modern bolt actions share as much with the Carcano, Mosin, or GEW-88 (which Mauser didn't design) as they do with any flavor of Mauser.

Ash

SwampWolf
September 26, 2008, 04:33 PM
Mr. de Haas was an acknowledged expert on bolt-action rifles. If he calls it a Mauser type action, it is a Mauser type action. Mr. de Haas is not alone in this opinion. In his book "American Rifle Design And Performance", author L.R. Wallack stated, "...Any turning bolt system is a direct descendant of Mauser's basic design. That even applies to many of today's guns that are operated by gas, lever, pump handles, and recoil. When the breechbolt turns into locked position and its lugs engage recesses in corresponding notches in the receiver, the action is partly Mauser."

Nobody has said that the basic Mauser design hasn't been modified or even improved over time. I took exception to the mistaken notion that Smith & Wesson "ripped off" the basic design of any contemporary turnbolt design that itself was indebted to the original Mauser- and that includes the Mossberg 800 "dude".

Ash
September 26, 2008, 06:10 PM
You need some schooling, there, if you want to go toe-to-toe. You obviously have no real grasp of actions, their designs, and their histories. Mausers were not the first turn-bolt designs, with the Vetterli coming long before. The box magazine was Lee's design. The Lebel and its forward locking lugs predates Mauser's forward-locking lug design. I have De Haas's book, by the way.

The basic Mauser design is largely discarded except in the CZ and Ruger rifles, which one could say are updated Mausers. Spend a bit more time reading your books, and try perhaps broadening your scope of knowledge. It is limited at present.

Ash

SwampWolf
September 26, 2008, 08:37 PM
You can always tell when a person runs out of logic and facts : they invariably resort to personal attacks and innuendo. I was only wondering how long it would take for you to stoop-and you didn't disappoint. You can take your arguments up with the de Haas's (you may need a seance here) and the Wallack's of the world as my fifty years of experience (thirty of which is in law enforcement and more than a few as instructor and competitive shooter) and my "scope of knowledge"is too "limited" for you.

Nobody was asking to go "toe-to-toe" with you; my manhood is not in jeopardy if I fail to agree with your position(s). The fact remains that most turnbolt actions have a direct lineage to the original Mauser design and if you can't grasp that historical reality, I (nor apparently Mr. de Haas nor Mr. Wallack nor any of the books you referenced that you've neglected to read) can't be of any help to you.

Ash
September 27, 2008, 12:16 AM
I took exception to the mistaken notion that Smith & Wesson "ripped off" the basic design of any contemporary turnbolt design that itself was indebted to the original Mauser- and that includes the Mossberg 800 "dude".

Glass houses, there, glass houses.

But that doesn't mean you still aren't wrong. Either way, you can quote any number of "experts" you like, but that does little to change simple facts of design and construction. And those facts remain that the vast majority of modern bolt-actions share as many features with early non-Mauser rifles, if not more, than with anything Paul Mauser designed. And, I have demonstrated this already, without need to quote somebody else.

Ash

SwampWolf
September 27, 2008, 02:42 AM
Dude, that I bolt is a rip-off of a Mossberg 800.

No "glass houses" here, sir.

You can believe what you want, obviously, and I really don't care. You've explained your position and I mine. It's apparent that a parade of experts would have no bearing on your thought processes and I have no desire to change your mind. We probably have a lot more in common than you might think so, with that in mind, I wish you the very best and bid you adieu.

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