I have a M1_Garand with two numbers


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matildainflorida@yahoo.c
September 10, 2008, 01:41 PM
I need info requarding an M1-Garand that my late uncle left me. It has NM on the chamber area.
First: since the gun is so old, what do I have to do to sell it?
Second: why would there be two numbers like serial numbers on it?
Does the "NM" have a greater resale value than one without? And what is that anyway?

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highorder
September 10, 2008, 01:48 PM
NM means National Match, and may increase the value.

M1's are quite collectable with many variations. A pic of the heel of the receiver where the writing is will help alot with identification.

There is other information on the rifle that will help too. The date on the barrel is visable when the op-rod is locked to the rear, and there is a drawing number on the leg of the receiver which will require removal from the stock.

Without knowing what state you are in (I'll assume Florida or Texas) selling regulations may be different. In general, you can sell face to face to another adult from your state.

Others will be by in a bit to fill out the details, including M1 buffs with more prowess that I.

Mr White
September 10, 2008, 02:17 PM
The gun itself has only 1 serial number, on the back of the receiver, it says US RIFLE CAL. .30 M1 and then a 5 to 7 digit number below it. That is the serial number.

Like highorder said, NM parts on the gun can increase its value greatly. Post some pics. Are the rear sights marked NM? The oprod? The gas cylinder? Depending on what you have, it could be quite a valuable rifle.

GarandOwner
September 10, 2008, 02:32 PM
First: You can sell it a number of ways, you can sell it on here in the rifles for sale thread section, gunbroker.com is another good way, you can find someone in your area (post an add at the local shooting range) and the last (and least recommended in my opinion if you want to get your moneys worth) would be to trade it in to a gun store. A gun store will give you the least out of all. Think if it as the same as trading in a car, they will give you less than what its worth so they can make money when they sell it.

If you want to sell it I would recomend learning more about the garand before you do, the price range on garands varies drastically due to what you have. WWII serial ranges go for more than post WWII, ones that have all "correct" parts for the time of manufacture go for more than mixed ones, and so forth.

second: There is only one serial number, that is stamped on the back of the reciever. I believe you are looking at the drawing number for the barrel (visible on the side of the barrel near when the operating rod is pulled back)

NM means that a certain part was made with tighter tolerances than normal parts. This increases the performance of the gun. Depending on what is marked NM would determine if it increases value.

For example: A NM barrel in good condition would be worth more than a standard barrel in the same condition, but a NM operating rod (due to the number of NM rods out there) would not add any value to the gun.



As stated above, post some pictures and list the serial number range that you want to sell, there are many on here that will make you an offer for the rifle.

highorder
September 10, 2008, 02:43 PM
The gun itself has only 1 serial number, on the back of the receiver, it says US RIFLE CAL. .30 M1 and then a 5 to 7 digit number below it.

In all fairness, that will be a 2 to 7 digit number. :)

I have seen 3 and 4 digits in circulation, and in theory, there must be a few 2 digits floating around.

30Cal
September 10, 2008, 02:54 PM
Condition is everything.

Trebor
September 10, 2008, 03:19 PM
There are actually going to be more then two numbers on the rifle.

The Serial Number, as noted, is on the heel of the receiver, behind the rear sight assembly.

Most of the other parts have "drawing numbers" that are different from the serial number and different from each other. These tell which contractor made that part and which version (revision) of the blueprings ("drawings") were used.

Having the drawing number on the parts allowed the military armorers to tell if any particular part needed to be replaced with a newer part that was redesigned later.

If you can post pics, it would help greatly. Right now I can guess that your rifle is worth between $300 and $3,000 dollars. The exact configuration and overall condition make a huge difference, along with the scarcity of some versions.

Chipperman
September 10, 2008, 07:37 PM
an M1-Garand that my late uncle left me

My condolences on the loss of your Uncle. Are you sure there is nobody in your family that would want to keep such a nice heirloom?

Neo-Luddite
September 10, 2008, 09:23 PM
Do yourself a favor, please;

Put it in the corner of your bedroom closet for a year. Do some reading/research about the M-1.

Then decide if you still want to sell that weapon.

Parting with an M-1 isn't something most here would recommend under the circumstances as you present them.

glockman19
September 10, 2008, 10:18 PM
My condolences on the loss of your Uncle. Are you sure there is nobody in your family that would want to keep such a nice heirloom?
+1 on your loss. and...
Do yourself a favor, please;

Put it in the corner of your bedroom closet for a year. Do some reading/research about the M-1.

Then decide if you still want to sell that weapon.

Parting with an M-1 isn't something most here would recommend under the circumstances as you present them.

Frandy
September 10, 2008, 10:27 PM
One more person who says, "Do not be hasty and sell this Garand." Even if you are not a person interested in firearms, wait until you understand what you have and what it's worth monetarily before you sell it. Believe me, you do not want someone to get it from you for much less than it's worth.

Think of it this way, how better to honor your deceased family member than by trying to be certain that what he had, what he might have valued, was sold for a price that represented what he thought of its value.

And, if you are a firearms person, put it in the closet and wait...

Oohrah
September 11, 2008, 04:36 AM
Hooded rear sight, glass bedded lower stock would be a start point
point to look further to determine if a match Garand, or yours wears a
few match parts. Navy put some in 7.62s together with some of the
barrels marked as such

Freightman
September 11, 2008, 12:17 PM
Go shoot it and when you are to the end of the clip see if you jump at the "PING", then close your eyes and see your uncle, father, grandfather carring it up some sandy beach to insure your freedom. Then if you can sell it there are a lot of buyers fo a M1 as it was the greatest battle rifle of WWII.

Mr White
September 12, 2008, 02:37 PM
In all fairness, that will be a 2 to 7 digit number. :)I stand corrected.

Matilda, If you have a Garand with a serial number having between 2 and 4 digits, can you say KA-CHINGGGG? The rifle is most likely worth some serious money.

Whatever the s/n and whatever you do, don't go selling it to the first person who comes along and offers you $1000 for it. Do the research and learn what you have first.

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