Ruger GP-100 as first gun


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emwave1
September 10, 2008, 09:30 PM
Ok, so this is my first post, go easy on me. After a month of deliberation and lots of money spent trying different guns at the range, I've decided to purchase a Ruger GP-100 4" barrel revolver as my first handgun. Anyone have a good reason why I shouldn't? :)

I tried a number of revolvers and semi-autos at the range, and I have to say, I found a lot of guns that I liked. After my wife gets used to us having the Ruger in the house, I plan on buying a semi-auto also, probably a S&W M&P9 (one of the guns I tried at the range). For the first gun however, I'm feeling revolver-ish...maybe as a tribute to my dad, who has been carrying a snub-nose S&W .38 for over 40 years as a (now retired) cop.

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Shade00
September 10, 2008, 09:34 PM
You won't be sorry. There are plenty of good used guns out there, but if you have put a considerable amount of time into firing guns at the range and are comfortable with the GP100, then that's what you should go with. The GP100 is a fine weapon, tough as nails, and one of the most affordable new revolvers you can buy.

By the way, welcome to the forum!

JCMAG
September 10, 2008, 09:38 PM
Welcome!

GP100 = fantastic. You've got good taste.

Here is one compelling reason not to get the GP100: I don't have it and therefore I resent you having it. You should buy two and give one to me. Thanks in advance :p

emwave1
September 10, 2008, 09:44 PM
Thanks guys...and you're welcome JCMAG...except there's a weird law in Virginia that makes it illegal to buy more than one handgun within 30 days, so you'll have to wait at least a month :D

ReadyontheRight
September 10, 2008, 10:01 PM
Great first gun. Get out there and shoot it! Maybe check out a bowling pin or silhouette match. Nothing makes you learn to shoot netter than a little competition.

Check out a .22 pistol next. Like a Browning Buckmark or Ruger MK2. For $350 or so, you can get a great 10-round pistol and thousands of rounds of ammo. Great way to learn without flinching.

Put 1000 rounds through a .22 and you'll be a better shooter than 99% of the people on the planet.

Congrats on the Ruger GP100! Enjoy!

461
September 10, 2008, 10:02 PM
You made a wonderful choice that will serve you very well.

batmann
September 10, 2008, 10:16 PM
Great choice!

Dienekes
September 10, 2008, 10:41 PM
Well, it's a BIG gun--but an awfully good big gun. Heavy for daily wear but ok in the field or on the range. My daily carry piece is still an old Security Six as it is smaller and lighter. I picked up a very nice stainless 4" GP from an estate some years back. It had a trigger job on it, done by a real pro. Never could find out who, but whoever he was, he was good!

I shoot that gun better than any .38/.357 I have owned. For that matter, better than almost any handgun I have ever tried. It has the original style grips (which I much prefer to the newer furnished ugly Hogues. .38s feel like .22s in it, and .357s feel like standard velocity .38s. Comfortable to shoot, "much smash-em."

Bianchi makes a UM-84R synthetic full-flap holster for it that carries the gun very well in the field. You tend to forget it's even there, which takes some doing.

FINE gun.:)

longtooth
September 10, 2008, 10:42 PM
Great choice. I carry a GP100 in a 3" barrel quit often.

almostfree
September 10, 2008, 10:49 PM
I've never had a Ruger firearm that wasn't a quality product. The GP100 is an excellent revolver. I have one with a 6" barrel and I really like it.

TimboKhan
September 10, 2008, 10:50 PM
You made a wonderful choice that will serve you very well.

I agree with this statement, with the addition that it will probably serve you well for your entire lifetime. Even people who aren't particularly in love with Rugers will agree that they are built strong.

It's a good, stout revolver that is unlikely to let you down. Excellent choice!

Also, welcome to THR!

The Lone Haranguer
September 10, 2008, 10:52 PM
No reason at all. I once owned one myself. When getting started shooting, you can download it with light .38 Specials and learn the basics without excessive recoil and blast. Then you can work up as you see fit. All the while being able to adjust the sights for a given load, so as to retain the same point of impact.

Legionnaire
September 10, 2008, 10:54 PM
Welcome to THR!
I've decided to purchase a Ruger GP-100 4" barrel revolver as my first handgun. Anyone have a good reason why I shouldn't?Not I! Excellent choice for a first handgun. My 4" GP is one of the last I'd get rid of.

novaDAK
September 10, 2008, 10:57 PM
except there's a weird law in Virginia that makes it illegal to buy more than one handgun within 30 days, so you'll have to wait at least a month
Get a VA Concealed Handgun Permit and you don't have to worry about that weird (and very stupid) law. It also doesn't apply to private sales either.

JohnKSa
September 11, 2008, 02:15 AM
It was my first firearm and I still think I made an excellent choice. ;)

greener
September 11, 2008, 07:05 AM
I own a GP100 and concur with the posters who say it is an excellent handgun. You choice of an M&P9 is also good. I have one of those and it has been darned reliable and easy to shoot.

I'd look at a .22 (Ruger single six, S&W 22A, Ruger MKIII/MKII or Browning Buck Mark) as a second handgun if your first one is the GP100. You can find good ones in the price range of $200-$400, new. Ammo is $10/550 and up, making it much less expensive than .38/.357 or 9mm. Learning to shoot a handgun accurately can be difficult and the .22's allow lots of practice without breaking the bank.

I didn't shoot for a very long time. When I decided to start shooting regularly, I bought a 22A as a trainer. I still shoot it regularly for training and fun. I may be a bit of a .22 addict since I now have 8 .22 handguns. When I take one or more of my centerfire handguns to the range, a couple of the .22's go along.

almostfree
September 11, 2008, 08:03 AM
There is a 4" stainless GP100 with a bobbed hammer over on rugerforum.com right now for $325 shipped. These were apparently issued to a Canadian PD. Current owner says it is in great condition. If it is, that's a really good deal.

http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=35439

If you aren't a member, I can get you in touch with the seller if interested.

D Boone
September 11, 2008, 08:03 AM
Great gun... I picked up a blued used one, found some stock grips from Brownells, and it looks good as new. My first revolver and one of my favorite firearms.

george29
September 11, 2008, 01:11 PM
Might as well close this thread, I can't think of any reason why the GP100 wouldn't be a great first gun unless someone just wanted to stir the pot a bit for the sake of smelling up the thread. Go for it emwave, THR members got your back on this one!

BigBlock
September 11, 2008, 04:06 PM
Yep, they are magnificent guns. I bought mine a few weeks ago and I absolutley love it. Right out of the box the trigger pull was very smooth and the lockup extremely tight...almost as if it had already seen a gunsmith for finishing.

steak-knife
September 11, 2008, 05:28 PM
The 4" GP100 is a great gun choice. It's an incredibly strong and robust design. So much so, that I would deem it a generational gun because even with heavy use, it probably will not break-down, and remain in service through many generations of your family.

Just FYI, on the 4" and 6" models, swapping out the front sight for something like a Millet day glow-orange tab or night sights will take less than 30 seconds. With the 3" model, it takes a bit more effort, as you have to knock out a pin and buff the replacement pin. Also, the front sights for the 4" and 6" models are not interchangeble with the 3" model.

tblt
September 11, 2008, 05:35 PM
My GP100 is a great gun my friend is always asking me I will sell it to him.I have had this gun for 22 years and it still looks new,I take it to the range about 3 times a year and take it hunting as a side arm or just when riding around on my 4 wheeler.
Love the gun.I only use 357 mag when hunting,at the range I shoot 38 spl.

printcraft
September 11, 2008, 05:38 PM
Great first choice. Have one myself.
BUT
You need to get a Glock for your first auto.
I don't have one... but I've hear everywhere that they are the best. :rolleyes:

Walkalong
September 11, 2008, 05:38 PM
Anyone have a good reason why I shouldn't? No. It is a fine choice to start with.

penny
September 11, 2008, 05:43 PM
The 4" GP100 was my 1st gun bought many years ago, it shot awesome!
Only sold it to move up to the 6" GP100.You can not go wrong with this as a 1st gun.

22-rimfire
September 11, 2008, 06:09 PM
The 4" GP-100 is an excellent first gun. I generally suggest a 22 as a first however. You'll shoot it more that the GP.

Dienekes
September 12, 2008, 01:02 AM
BTW, there are a lot of reasons why a GP-100 could be your last gun as well as your first one. There will be a lot more guns out there screaming "buy me" at you in years to come--but frankly I doubt you really "need" many of them. :neener:

Had the GP-100 been in existence in 1959 when I got interested in handgun shooting, I could have done everything between then and now (including an LEO career) with just that one piece. The equivalent at the time was the Smith M28, and the GP-100 is in fact a better gun than that was.:evil: It really hurts S&W fans to admit it, but other than the N frame mystique, it's true. And I have owned three. :p

RugerDoug
September 12, 2008, 01:46 AM
I have the GP100 in 3,4, and 6 inch barrels. You cant go wrong with a GP100.

BullitHolz
September 12, 2008, 02:31 AM
Head over to rugerforum.net and post ten times then you can get a copy of the GP-100 IBOK. Just what is the IBOK you ask? Well there is a very nice retired gunsmith that is one of the forum moderators over there that was nice enough to write a nice do it yourself manual on how to tune up a GP-100 to get a very nice trigger pull and smooth out the action quite a bit.

It's a great gun and it gets ever better with just a little bit of polishing up of the internals. You might want to look into picking up a Wolf springpack for your GP as well as this will allow you to tailor the trigger pull and smoothness of the action as well.

I've got a 6" and both the double and single action trigger pulls are smooth and light, very nice for target shooting. I used to really want a Smith 686 but after shooting a friends I actually like my GPO better.

easyrider6042004@yahoo.ca
September 12, 2008, 04:23 AM
I've decided to purchase a Ruger GP-100 4" barrel revolver as my first handgun. Anyone have a good reason why I shouldn't?

Nope. This could be your first and last revolver and you'd be none the wiser.

Anyhow, Bullitholz' suggestion of getting a copy of the GP100 IBOK (Iowegan's Book of Knowledge) is a must for GP100 owners/enthusiasts. Actually, I had less than 10 posts and emailed Iowegan for a copy and he promptly he emailed it. Fine gentleman.

jaholder1971
September 12, 2008, 02:52 PM
I love my Smiths and I love my Rugers. Can't get enough of them.

I think Iowegian's no longer offering this, but there is a mailbot address that you can get it from, that's where I got mine.

Troll around over on Rugerforum and find it, just avoid the Lounge and Conceled Carry and Political, it can get a little hot in there!

jjohnson
September 12, 2008, 03:00 PM
Welcome to friendly territory!

Good question, and there's very little to say about the GP100 not being a great choice other than the fact that most of us start with .22s. I am NOT saying you shouldn't have the GP100. What I'm suggesting is that if you like your GP100, you may find that you get a lot more "range time" and practice for your dollar if you think about getting a .22 as well. Most of us start to flinch after we shoot a couple boxes of .357 :what: just plinking or doing informal target practice.

The GP100 is a fine firearm, sturdy, quality, and big enough to "do the job" if you're using it for self defense.

Glad to have you join us. You'll find that all you have to do is ask a question, and you will be rewarded with a couple answers and many more opinions! :scrutiny:

Run&Shoot
September 13, 2008, 12:20 AM
A 4" GP100 is an excellent choice. The main thing is to get a handgun that has a trigger you like, is of a manageable size and weight and has sights you can use. All of that varies by individual.

When I got a handgun for my youngest daughter after she graduated college I gave her a choice of anything she wanted. She liked the trigger and overall feel of a 3" GP100.

If you like the Gp100 then you have a fine revolver that will last 2 or more generations.

emwave1
September 13, 2008, 09:21 PM
Thanks a lot for all the great words! I went to Virginia Arms Co. today and bought the gun! It's the stainless steel version with a 4" barrel. I'm excited to head to the range to get to know the gun better, but it feels great in my hand. It might be my first and last revolver, but I'm almost sure I'm going to get a S&W M&P 9mm as my next gun...I'm sure that will be a more controversial thread...and I'm going to apply for my concealed-carry permit soon.

ds/ks
September 13, 2008, 09:37 PM
I own a 4" stainless GP too. If I could only have one, it would be it.
Congrats on the new Ruger.:cool:

emwave1
September 19, 2008, 10:40 PM
So I finally got to the range. Sweet firearm, very solid to hold. I fired mostly .38 Special, which barely made the GP-100 move, but I also fired some .357 just to get the feel...kicked my butt a little bit, but I was still fairly accurate. The Blackwater sniper team in the lane next to me made me flinch a little bit, too, but it's all good :D

jhansman
September 19, 2008, 11:13 PM
Every so often I think about selling one of my guns; all of them fall under consideration except my 4" SS GP-100. That gun will never purposely leave my possession. You cannot go wrong with this revolver, any way you slice it.

Gunsnrovers
September 19, 2008, 11:48 PM
only reason against it would be if it's the house gun, it may be a bit large for your wife to use.

It's a good solid revolver, but it's big.

BigBlock
September 20, 2008, 12:58 AM
It's a good solid revolver, but it's big.
That's why I love it so much. .38 specials are like mouse farts, and full power .357s are pretty easy too. The heavy full lug barrel plays a big part in the recoil.

bruss01
September 21, 2008, 01:42 AM
The GP was my first handgun. It will likely last you a lifetime of faithful service.

I advise you to never sell it. Sure, you may buy other guns, but never sell this to finance a new purchase. Determine to go to your grave with this one. You won't be sorry.

JohnKSa
September 21, 2008, 02:48 PM
It's a good solid revolver, but it's big.The fixed sight models with the half-underlug barrels & the small grips are a good bit less imposing in terms of size & weight.

qdemn7
September 22, 2008, 10:29 AM
Head over to rugerforum.net and post ten times then you can get a copy of the GP-100 IBOK. Just what is the IBOK you ask? Well there is a very nice retired gunsmith that is one of the forum moderators over there that was nice enough to write a nice do it yourself manual on how to tune up a GP-100 to get a very nice trigger pull and smooth out the action quite a bit.

BullitHolz, thanks for the timely info. I am seriously thinking of buying a GP100. Nice to know there is a forum dedicated just to Ruger's and some very helpful people. :)

foghornl
September 22, 2008, 10:42 AM
The GP-100 {Hmmm does 'GP' mean General Purpose?} will handle anything from the "Rodent Flatulence" .38Spl target & 'Cowboy Action' loads, all the way up to the just short of thermo-nuclear .357Mag rounds.

Next up on my "I want one of those" list.

Fishman777
September 23, 2008, 10:28 AM
I think that Colts and Smiths are great, but if you want a no nonsense gun that will last and last and last, I think that the GP100 is the best .357 on the market.

AH-1
September 23, 2008, 11:02 AM
I have a few rugers and the 4" gp100 is about my fav.Ilike the 4" better for woods carry.mine is a accurate revolver:).I am sure you will be very happy with yours.
pete

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v238/txpete/gp100002.jpg

it turned 20 years old this year:)

bflobill_69
September 23, 2008, 05:10 PM
It will handle .357 loads all day long...

It is a relatively big gun (large frame), which I like!

Trigger action is nice, but not as nice as S&W.

Solid choice for a first gun, enjoy it.

Bflobill_69

mgregg85
September 23, 2008, 09:36 PM
The GP-100 is a great choice, its a very sturdy gun.

I've got the 6" full lug barrel and full power .357 magnums feel like .22 LR.

BikerRN
September 24, 2008, 01:48 AM
I have no reason not to encourage you to get a GP100 as a first handgun. :)

It's an excellent choice. I would recommend a .22 Revolver as a first choice, but many people don't have the money to spend on two guns when starting out. I like the .22 because it has little to no recoil, is cheap to shoot and be used for small game hunting, plinking and target shooting.

Just start with "soft" 38 Special loads, and practice the fundamentals a lot. Also, take a safety class and get some instruction that you have to pay for. I'm a firm believer in, "You get what you pay for."

BikerRN

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