Indoor Loudness of common home defense rounds


PDA






GunLvrNLearner
September 12, 2008, 01:10 AM
I never seem to be at the shooting range alone so other guns are being fired.

I was curious if it has been measured or anyone just knows,like in a home defense situation most likely with no hearing protection.


How does 9mm,45 and 357magnum compare...I am certain the loudness is in that order but my question is how do they compare as in how MUCH MORE LOUD is each versus the other...Thanks

If you enjoyed reading about "Indoor Loudness of common home defense rounds" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Tribal
September 12, 2008, 01:16 AM
.45 is actually more of a boom, compared to the crack of the 9mm and .357, as it's normally subsonic. I'd rather shoot my 1911 than BHP indoors if we're just talking about sound.

lloydkristmas
September 12, 2008, 01:34 AM
From what I hear, your body sort of "tunes out" the sound in high tension scenarios like the kind that would require use of your gun. A lot of soldiers in combat, as well as officers involved in shootings, say that they dont even really hear the gun, or that it was a small 'pop'.

Dienekes
September 12, 2008, 02:10 AM
Lots of verified anecdotal stories of not even hearing the gun go off in a confrontation. OTOH without that intense stress, it could be very bad. I still remember taking a shot at a jackrabbit with a .357/125 out of a 4" barrel.

It hurt like hell.

I would give serious consideration to a set of electronic muffs if I expected to have to rouse up in the middle of the night and do any shooting. My preferred load without protection would be a stout .38 Special load or a .45.

Every shot without ear protection takes at least a small part of your hearing with it.

LightningMan
September 12, 2008, 02:18 AM
I personally know a retired PD officer whom was in a shootout within the confines of a car. He was hit 3 times and survived but the arrested suspect didn't, anyway the concussion of the firearms blew out the windows but he doesn't really remember much about how loud it was, just being covered with glass afterward. I guess when you are in a fight for your life, with the adreline flowing, you kind of tune those things out. LM

Stevie-Ray
September 12, 2008, 03:01 AM
Every shot without ear protection takes at least a small part of your hearing with it.Very true, whether you remember hearing it or not.

SubSolar
September 12, 2008, 03:11 AM
.45 is actually quieter than 9mm, .40, .357. I think cause it's slower and doesn't break the sound barrier. Yet another reason to make bigger holes.

nero45acp
September 12, 2008, 03:54 AM
I had a ND with a Walther PPK 16 years ago. Even the .32acp is LOUD indoors. :what:



nero

Nematocyst
September 12, 2008, 04:20 AM
Every shot without ear protection takes at least a small part of your hearing with it.
Very true, whether you remember hearing it or not.

Biologist and anatomy and physiology teacher here.

I suspect this relates to the distinction between "hearing" and "perception".

When confronted with a large mass of rapidly moving air (AKA sound wave), your ear drum will move, which in turn will trigger movement in those three little bones associated with the middle ear that transfer pressure into your inner ear. That's the mechanical part of "hearing".

When the sound is above a critical threshold measured in decibels, some damage will occur to the inner ear. Some portion of that will be permanent, perhaps resulting in tinnitus (a constant ringing sound) or worse.

However, the action potential (electrical impulse) that actually transfers that information to your brain, resulting in "perception" (awareness of the sound) may be overridden by the stress of the shooting. During that time, visual and other information dominates the brain, trying to keep ysa alive.

Summary: even if you don't perceive it, it may cause damage.

If I have to shoot one inside w/o protection, I'll take .38 spl non +p.

loop
September 12, 2008, 07:06 AM
Subsonics, which have been measured, are less harmful to long-term hearing than supersonics.

Defensory
September 12, 2008, 08:02 AM
A .357 is louder than even a 12-gauge shotgun and .30-06 rifle. It is also considerably louder than the 9mm and .45 ACP. The 9mm is louder than a .45 ACP.

http://www.freehearingtest.com/hia_gunfirenoise.shtml

corpsmanup!
September 12, 2008, 08:41 AM
When your body goes into survival mode- it does wonderful things like dump all the stored epinephrine from your adrenal gland causing heart rate and volume to increase, blood sugar to sky rocket, your pupils dilate so you can see where you are going to run or fight however many assailants there are, and your perceived hearing becomes muted and muffled.

gwnorth
September 12, 2008, 09:26 AM
There are web sites that say .357 has been recorded at 160-165dB.

www.freehearingtest.com says that 160dB for 2mseconds is equivalent to the same exposure as 40hrs in a noise workplace (although they don't say what that means - steel mill blast furnace noisy workplace or an outdoor construction site?).

All the info seems to agree that a single .357 blast in a closed space is almost certainly going to cause permanent hearing damage or even loss. It's far worse for people standing off the the sides and forward of the shooter then then shooter themselves though.

Anyway, I hope to never find out for sure - indoor ranges I wear ear plugs under my Remington ear muffs! For HD, I load .38spl (although not merely because of noise/blast concerns).

Double Naught Spy
September 12, 2008, 09:35 AM
You also have to understand that a shot indoors is NOT experienced just once, but multiple times in rapid, but slowing and de-intensifying fashion. Here, I will just refer to structural considerations.

First you have the gunshot noise and (if supersonic) the sonic crack.
Next you have the first reflected noise back from the closest floor, wall, or ceiling. For any shot, if you are inside, you should get 6 for a normal room with 4 sides, a floor, and a ceiling. If the floor isn't carpeted, then at least 5 will likely be nearly as ear damaging as the initial shot. The wall behind you will reflect the least noise to you from the initial shot because you will shadow that wall with your own body.

Next will come the re-reflected reports, a bit later and a bit slower, and with less pressure (noise).

Then the re-re-reflected.

Then the re-re-re-reflected.

etc.

At some point, the overall pressure will eventually reduce to being non-damaging after several reflections and combined reflections. HOWEVER, you will have been exposed to several episodes of damaging sound so quickly that you will only discern it as a single report.

Ed4032
September 12, 2008, 09:43 AM
I once accidently fired a 45-70 indoors. I never heard it, but knew it had gone off when I saw the smoke.

Disaster
September 12, 2008, 09:43 AM
http://www.freehearingtest.com/hia_gunfirenoise.shtml

Thanks for the link.

I agree with most people who say you won't even think about the sound when things are happening and yes, you will experience hearing loss from it.

If you are really concerned get yourself a suppressor for you handgun.

For me, when it comes down to my life, for a little lost hearing...the choice is elementary. I'm not going to pick a defensive round based on it's effect on my long term hearing. I'm choosing it based on it's immediate effect on Mr. BadGuy.

NG VI
September 12, 2008, 11:52 AM
.45 is actually more of a boom, compared to the crack of the 9mm and .357, as it's normally subsonic. I'd rather shoot my 1911 than BHP indoors if we're just talking about sound.

I have had the misfortune to hear both a 230 grain .45 and a 115 grain 9mm indoors, in small rooms both times, and it sucks. The .45 hurt a whole lot less, the 9mm was a very sharp sound, the .45 was a much gentler booming noise, after both but especially the 9mm all I could hear was a whining noise. With both it was sort of a quick deafening that slowly was replaced by a whine.

Not pleasant.

cjw3cma
September 12, 2008, 01:35 PM
"Every shot without ear protection takes at least a small part of your hearing with it".
Very true, whether you remember hearing it or not.

WHAT ????? Can't hear you; wadda say??? :neener:

highorder
September 12, 2008, 01:44 PM
I forgot to don my muffs once and fired a .357 in a basement out of a 4" 586.

I suffered frequency loss in my left ear from that single shot.

rcmodel
September 12, 2008, 01:46 PM
.45 is actually quieter than 9mm, .40, .357. I think cause it's slower and doesn't break the sound barrier.It actually has nothing to do with bullet velocity, or whether it is super-sonic or not.

What matters is the operating pressure and the shock wave from the blast.

The .45 ACP, .38 Spl, and others of that power level operate at about half the chamber pressure of the 9mm, .40, & .357.

rcmodel

Serena
October 3, 2008, 05:53 AM
Rcmodel, that's interesting info. Can you say more about the operating pressure and its relationship to decibels, or post a link, or a book reference? I'd like to read more about this.

Thanks.

PTK
October 3, 2008, 06:02 AM
They're all DANG loud, and that's why my HD guns are silenced. Still loud, but not "my ears are bleeding" loud.

Concrete walled rooms (like my entire apartment) make for noise being echoed back.

Nematocyst
October 3, 2008, 07:14 AM
The .45 ACP, .38 Spl, and others of that power level operate at
about half the chamber pressure of the 9mm, .40, & .357..357 mag outside
(especially in a carbine).
Will take deer to 50 m.

.38 spl +p inside.
Good enough.

ARTiger
October 3, 2008, 08:17 AM
Frequency of the sound make a difference. While 9mm and .45 ACP may both measure around 155 decibels, the 9mm report will be at a higher frequency range.

Stevie-Ray
October 5, 2008, 03:24 AM
Biologist and anatomy and physiology teacher here.
Summary: even if you don't perceive it, it may cause damage.
If I have to shoot one inside w/o protection, I'll take .38 spl non +p.Thank you sir, for adding a professional opinion to those of us that have been saying this all along. .45ACP shooter, here, and looking to add e-muffs to my HD equipment.

wep45
October 5, 2008, 07:58 PM
Firing a .357 magnum indoors, without earing protection will definitely rattled your brain. Don't want to do that more than once. :eek:

briansp82593
October 5, 2008, 08:05 PM
40 s&w, twice :o
No hearing loss

Hawaiian
October 5, 2008, 09:17 PM
Outdoors, my son fired a 5.56 M4 before I got my ears on. I was only a few feet from him. I actually felt pain in my ears. Not to mention the ringing and I could not hear much of anything for an hour. I don't ever want to experience that again.

kludge
October 5, 2008, 10:35 PM
Remember, +10dB = twice as loud.

Defensory
October 6, 2008, 05:19 AM
Posted by wep45:
Firing a .357 magnum indoors, without earing protection will definitely rattled your brain. Don't want to do that more than once.

Actually, I strongly advise against EVER doing it, unless you happen to be attacked and are in fear for your life.

.45 ACP is FAR better suited for indoor self-defense than the .357 Magnum.

theken206
October 6, 2008, 05:31 AM
dont know, but 12GA mil spec buck shot and .30-30 rounds are pretty loud indoors it seems

grimjaw
October 6, 2008, 09:47 AM
I've only ever done this once, with a .22LR out of a Beretta Bobcat, through negligence. I can tell you I don't EVER want to experience the sound of something louder w/o hearing protection if I don't have to.

jm

spacemanspiff.mc
October 6, 2008, 11:50 AM
"Remember, +10dB = twice as loud."

Actually it's even worse than that because it's a logarithmic scale and therefore more damaging to the ears.
+10dB = 10x as loud
+20dB = 100x as loud
+30dB = 1000x as loud

etc

MrIzhevsk
October 6, 2008, 12:35 PM
I shot a magazine through a Walther PP and it felt like my ears were ringing for days. I regretted that one.

shooter58
October 6, 2008, 12:42 PM
The decible level is as follows:

.357 magnum revolver: 164.5 db
9mm pistol: 159.8 db
45 acp pistol: 157.0 db


They all hurt.

jjohnson
October 6, 2008, 05:47 PM
Well, I've shot indoors with full power .357 mag loads and can tell you it's flat out concussive. :eek: In a room of maybe 1500 cubic feet of airspace with nowhere else for the sound to go, it's just about deafening. You know, ears ringing for a couple hours.

I fully believe that the .45 would make more of a boom and be less unpleasant, and the 9mm going subsonic would have a sharper crack, but I can tell you for sure you don't want to touch off a hot .357 load indoors without protection unless you really have to. :what:

Claude Clay
October 6, 2008, 06:13 PM
e-muffs next to the gun & the flash. e-muffs save your ears if you have to fire AND allows you to hear 'them' whispering in the other rooms. it is such a win/win thing to do.
besides, if 'they' see you in jammies with ears and a flash and a gun: they'll think you're ray walston and run. :what:

Kleanbore
October 6, 2008, 07:28 PM
Originally posted by Defensory: Actually, I strongly advise against EVER doing it [(firing a .357 magnum indoors, without hearing protection)], unless you happen to be attacked and are in fear for your life.

That's excellent advice, and a lot of people seem unaware of this and similar advice from others.

In Sixguns, Elmer Keith describes the recoil and muzzle blast of shooting a 3 1/2 inch .357 in an indoor range as extremely objectionable to hardened ammunition testers. Imagine doing that without ear protection!

rondog
October 6, 2008, 07:54 PM
I can tell you that no matter what the situation, hearing protection is vital. I understand that for home defense in the middle of the night, you're not likely to have earmuffs on. I'd be lucky to wake up and get my glasses on.

I can personally attest to the unpleasantness of tinnitus. It's nothing to be happy about, and it never goes away. I used to be young and stupid with a .357, and didn't need no stinkin' muffs. Tinnitus is freakin' miserable.

Ringtail
October 6, 2008, 08:27 PM
That's funny that this question should come up, because several years ago I had the same question. I made a bullet trap in the garage and tested what I had on hand. I used ear protection so my observations were relitive rather than absolute. And what I found out then was what everyone is saying now.

.22 short in berretta pocket auto = loud enough to be uncomfortable. .44 special 246 gr. LRN. in S&W 4" revolver = very loud but low muzzle flash. .45acp in 5" colt 1911 = louder than .44 special slightly more muzzle flash. Full power .357 mag. in 6" revolver = ear splitting with blinding muzzle flash. I had a 4" .41 mag. but enough was enough. At a latter date I tried out a .280 rem. deer rifle. The report was breathtaking an the fireball out of the end of the barrel truly awsome - lit up the place like daylight for just an instant.

Conclusions: 1. any firearm discharged in a closed space will most likley cause at least some hearing damage with the 1st shot.

2. A .44 spl or .45 ACP is a good choice for a home defence gun

3. A shot fired out of a .357 mag. will most likely leave you and the bad guy completely disorenited.

4. Shooting deer rifles is an outdoor sport.

5. When push comes to shove my life is worth more than my hearing.

Befor anyone rags on me for conducting such a stupid test, please know that I already know it was a rather dumb thing to do, but it was fun anyway.

Andy-Y
October 6, 2008, 08:29 PM
I can personally attest to the unpleasantness of tinnitus. It's nothing to be happy about, and it never goes away. I used to be young and stupid with a .357, and didn't need no stinkin' muffs. Tinnitus is freakin' miserable.

No doubt about that, tinnitus DOES suck. That constant ringing will drive you nuts if you let it. I used to shoot skeet, duck hunt out of a blind, and operate loud power tools without hearing protection. I regret it every day, and the only time I don't use hearing protection now is when I hunt. Though I do plan on getting some of those electronic ears for hunting soon.

As to the original question, I know it's loud and really bad for you, but if I HAD to I wouldn't hesitate emptying a mag in my house, hearing be damned! :uhoh:

neviander
October 6, 2008, 09:36 PM
I fired a .357 with a 6 inch barrel when I was very much outside and it deafened me for the rest of the day....scared the crap out of me. There was no loud bang, just a short "P" sound then no birds singing and I couldn't hear what my buddies were saying when they were right next to me. I handed the gun off and walked inside.

Has anyone seen There Will be Blood? (I'll try not to spoil it) I think of the scene where the character that had been deafened was laying on their side just moaning, but they couldn't hear themselves. That's kind of what I was doing until my hearing returned; of course I wasn't completely deaf, but I kept kind of saying "la la la" to test my hearing.

For that reason, I won't buy a .357 handgun...a rifle sure, but that supersonic muzzle blast that close to my head won't happen again, at least not voluntarily.

Defensory
October 7, 2008, 02:47 AM
Posted by Ringtail:
1. any firearm discharged in a closed space will most likley cause at least some hearing damage with the 1st shot.

I agree.

2. A .44 spl or .45 ACP is a good choice for a home defence gun.

Strongly agree. Those who prefer revolvers, would be very wise to use a .44 Special for indoor self-defense, and save the .357 Magnums for outdoor use.

3. A shot fired out of a .357 mag. will most likely leave you and the bad guy completely disoriented.

Agreed. If you fire a .357 Magnum in a low/no light situation indoors, you can count on being blinded, deafened and disoriented for at least several seconds. If your assailant recovers before you do, you may very well end up a dead man.

4. Shooting deer rifles is an outdoor sport.

No-brainer! ;)

5. When push comes to shove my life is worth more than my hearing.

Absolutely. But if you plan ahead and use a caliber that's easier on your ears than the .357 Magnum, such as .44 Spl or .45 ACP, you can avoid or at least reduce significant permanent damage.

Befor anyone rags on me for conducting such a stupid test, please know that I already know it was a rather dumb thing to do, but it was fun anyway.

You stated you used hearing protection. If the protection you used was adequate, and you suffered no hearing damage, then I don't see a problem with your test.

Defensory
October 7, 2008, 02:54 AM
Posted by Kleanbore:
That's excellent advice, and a lot of people seem unaware of this and similar advice from others.

In Sixguns, Elmer Keith describes the recoil and muzzle blast of shooting a 3 1/2 inch .357 in an indoor range as extremely objectionable to hardened ammunition testers. Imagine doing that without ear protection!

Elmer Keith was a man's man, and probably knew as much about revolvers (and revolver ammo) as anybody alive during his lifetime.

If he says .357 Mag is too loud indoors, IT'S TOO LOUD.

As I stated in my previous post, those who prefer revolvers would be very wise to use .44 Spl for indoor defense, and save the .357 Mag for outdoor use.

loop
October 7, 2008, 06:20 AM
This thread has gone on a while and I'm surprised no one has mentioned the side affects of shooting a high-powered round in the house.

I once had fired several rounds of .357 in the living room (circumstances are irrelevant). We had a lot of things hanging from the walls. There were a lot of photos, artwork, a number of guns and knickknacks. My guess would be half of the them came down on the first round.

I know because it distracted me from the armed men coming through the front door. I ended up firing five rounds (there was one left in the gun when the police arrived). About a third of the loose things (lamps, ashtrays, wall hangings) were not on the floor. Everything in the room that was relatively light in weight was not where it was before.

I really do not recall the hearing issue from the time, but I do recall feeling like I received a full-body slap with every round. I actually felt like I had been beaten up.

I was the only one to fire a gun. I fired five rounds. Four were accounted for. The only one I was sure of was the first guy through the door. He got a .357 half-jacketed, 158-grain HP to COM. Guess I just kept shooting because it seemed like the right thing to do...

I had to buy a lot of new picture frames. It took a week to clean up all the glass and crap. When I moved a year later we found stuff we'd missed in that first week of cleaning.

As far as loud, didn't sound very loud to me. Sounded like what I expected. Concussion was a real surprise though. I'm used to it now though. You do have to be very careful of your eyes. The concussion of shooting a high-powered round in confined quarters will blur your vision severely.

Concussion is the most overlooked part of confrontational shooting I know of. Because I've been on receiving end more than once I feel it is the most important thing folks who haven't been in CQC need to be concerned of.

It is also the reason a mouse gun is effective. I can miss your head by a foot with a .32, but you won't be able to see and you'll be disoriented, unless you are a veteran of CQC.

BTOP, loud? What do I care? I don't have to hear again until I'm answering questions for the PD.

Loud? supersonic negates your hearing faster than subsonic.

I would also add that way too much of what people know about guns must come from TV. Blow off a round of 30-06 in your living room and then check to see if your TV still works.

The reality of shooting in a defensive posture is quite different from what anyone who has not done it can imagine.

kludge
October 7, 2008, 05:44 PM
Remember, +10dB = twice as loud.

Actually it's even worse than that because it's a logarithmic scale and therefore more damaging to the ears.
+10dB = 10x as loud
+20dB = 100x as loud
+30dB = 1000x as loud

etc

Often quoted, but not true. (+6 dB is also often quoted for being twice as loud.)

Trust me. I do this for a living. +10dB = twice as loud.

spacemanspiff.mc
October 7, 2008, 06:46 PM
No...

http://www.phys.unsw.edu.au/jw/dB.html

We're talking about loudness of sounds in DBs. Not sones or phons or the perceived loudness.

Black Majik
October 7, 2008, 06:51 PM
Even .22LR without hearing protection is quite unbearable.


That hurt and made my ears ring for quite a bit.

kcshooter
October 7, 2008, 09:46 PM
From what I hear, your body sort of "tunes out" the sound in high tension scenarios like the kind that would require use of your gun.I can verify this, with real-life experience shooting a .357 defensively inside a house.

Didn't hear a thing. But my ears rang afterward, when I had calmed down enough to notice.

kludge
October 8, 2008, 11:00 AM
No...

http://www.phys.unsw.edu.au/jw/dB.html

We're talking about loudness of sounds in DBs. Not sones or phons or the perceived loudness.

How else would a human percieve it?

From your link:

Experimentally it was found that a 10 dB increase in sound level corresponds approximately to a perceived doubling of loudness.

and

Wouldn't it be great to be able to convert from dB (which can be measured by an instrument) to sones (which approximate loudness as perceived by people)? This is usually done using tables that you can find in acoustics handbooks. However, if you don't mind a rather crude approximation, you can say that the A weighting curve approximates the human frequency response at low to moderate sound levels, so dBA is very roughly the same as phons. Then use the logarithmic relation between sones and phons described above.

dBA is simply a weighting curve, and dB's on one weighing curve correspond 1:1 with dB's on any other weighting curve, and a curve with no weighting.

Disaster
October 8, 2008, 11:09 AM
3. A shot fired out of a .357 mag. will most likely leave you and the bad guy completely disorenited.

As has been mentioned by others who have actually done it. Don't expect any tactical advantage or loss, due to disorientation. The fight will go on and the effects will only really be noticed afterwards...when the adrenaline level comes back to normal.

wep45
October 20, 2008, 02:35 PM
Nope, you don't have to.

that's what's nice about the .357 you can use it outdoors AND indoors,
when you are indoors, load it with .38 special :D

eatont9999
October 20, 2008, 04:24 PM
I know a .380 ACP is loud enough to disorient a listener behind the shooter.

gazpacho
October 21, 2008, 05:29 AM
A few years back, I was Unfortunate enough to be in the same 10'x15' room with a few friends when one of them was stupid enough to ND an AR pistol (5.56 NATO). Luckily he was just smart enough to obey rule #2.

My ears rang for about 15 minutes, and I had a slight headache for about a half an hour. I didn't suffer any noticable hearing loss, but I wouldn't be surprised if there was some.

It was definately loud.

I can't inagine it was less loud than a 357mag would be.

That was it. Nothing else happened. The roof didn't fall in from the concussion, and no furniture got violently repositioned.

About the only thing I thought about for the first few minutes following the ND was, "Did that actually just happen?"

Mike U.
October 21, 2008, 03:12 PM
I've had the misfortune of being present three times when a firearm was discharged in an enclosed space.
(don't ask why or how)

First was IIRC, a 124 gr. Federal JHP discharged in a 1977 Dodge Aspen with all the windows rolled up. OUCH! Ears rang fairly loudly for weeks after. It never really went away all the way either.

Second was in my living room. Accidental discharge of .357 Winchester 180 gr. Partition Gold round out of a S&W model 65 with 4" barrel. Permanent tinnitus from that one.

Third was a IIRC, a CCI Stinger out of a carbine in living room. ouch...

Here's one that also happened involving a pellet gun (of all things). I shoot the pellet gun indoors sometimes when I get new pellets to make sure the rifle is minute-of-tree-rat accurate. I'd just bought some new fangled alloy pellets made by Crossman. Loaded one up, took aim at the pellet trap and squeezed the trigger. CRAACK!! OWWW!!!! That pellet had to have gone hypersonic as it was just as loud as the Stinger. It actually hurt my ears. It also made a sizeable dent in the back of the trap. That was the loudest pellet gun discharge I've ever experienced. WAAAY louder than even the much vaunted Gamo Raptors. Needless to say, practice with those suckers happens outside in the back yard and only outside.

Lesson learned? Any type of gunfire can kill out in front and wound out back.

wep45
October 21, 2008, 03:26 PM
i guess you like them indoor ranges:uhoh:

Ben86
October 22, 2008, 12:39 AM
Even a .22 pistol will make your ears ring. A 9mm is not as loud as a .357 because the .357 has more gun powder. But I can only tell from a distance. Up close they all make my ears ring and once I can't hear anything but ringing they are all equally loud in my book.

Shooting inside a house is about twice as loud as shooting at an outdoor range because of all the echoing.

And not to highjack this thread but, can the gun's recoil/concusive blast ever cause eye damage. Retina detachment for instance?

Mike U.
October 25, 2008, 05:26 AM
present three times when a firearm was discharged in an enclosed space

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

i guess you like them indoor ranges

Apparently.:neener: :)
I really like to use the indoors for the pellet gun when I'm up late and get an itchy trigger finger. Across the living room into my study is 10 yards. Loads of fun. :D
The only real advantage of living alone is you don't have to worry about someone stepping out into your line of fire. I'd like to use a basement for this type of play, but, their not really a good idea here in Florida. And, even shooting a pellet gun out in the backyard at 4:20 am doesn't make ya very popular with the neighbors either. :)

I prefer shooting rimfire and centerfire outdoors at the range or a nice remote area. Fixing bullet holes in the walls is a PITA. :banghead: And, it riles the neighbors. Bloody killjoys...

CowardRubi06
October 28, 2008, 03:14 AM
When I was about 15 or so my friend found his dads 44 mag with a 6.5" barrel. It was ported on top of that. I was about 2 feet away beside the chamber when he had a negligent discharge. I couldnt hear for over a week, still have slight ringing in my ears and never hung out with him again.

JaxNovice
October 28, 2008, 07:35 AM
I just read through this post and wanted to solicit the boards opinion on the .45LC for indoor home defense.

If you enjoyed reading about "Indoor Loudness of common home defense rounds" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!