Anybody here ever 'camped out' at a gun buyback?


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GigaBuist
September 18, 2008, 08:02 PM
There's a gun buyback coming up in my area this weekend. I've always wanted to show up at one with a sign letting the old folks dropping off stuff that I'll give them an assessment of what it's actually worth.

I just don't understand how you could let an elderly widow drop off something like an M1 Garand and send her packing with $50. That just seems so wrong to me.

So, anybody here ever tried it? I'm not even really interested in buying anything as I don't have anything in the 'ole gun fund right now, just don't want to see anybody dump good money down the drain, especially the elderly.

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Rustynuts
September 18, 2008, 08:06 PM
I see the cops drumming up some bogus charge, fining you and making you leave!

JCMAG
September 18, 2008, 08:13 PM
As brilliant as it is, I wouldn't advertise what you are doing out there during the buyback. I recommend bringing a newspaper and maybe a cellphone with solitaire or something on it so you can seem very intent and busy between marks.

I would also be very attentive to the laws concerning purchasing handguns in your area, especially concerning public property.

If you can pull it off--great! :D

nalioth
September 18, 2008, 08:18 PM
I would also be very attentive to the laws concerning purchasing handguns in your area, especially concerning public property.Wait, what?

WhisperFan
September 18, 2008, 08:20 PM
There is a local gun shop whose owner did just that at a local buy-back.

He was on public property and the cops found nothing illegal about what he was doing. He was only looking for the widow with a Luger, or a carbine, or a Garand.

So - he was not forced to leave, he was not charged, he was not 'arrested' for anything.

WhisperFan
September 18, 2008, 08:21 PM
There is a local gun shop whose owner did just that at a local buy-back.

He was on public property and the cops found nothing illegal about what he was doing. He was only looking for the widow with a Luger, or a carbine, or a Garand (or a similar high-value firearm)

So - he was not forced to leave, he was not charged, he was not 'arrested' for anything.

Then again ... I heard that this same dealer bought 40 or 50 cheap pocket pistols (Ravens, or Locins) for a buy-back. He paid something like 59.00 each for them. Brought them new, in the box, to the buy-back and got 100.00 each for them. At the time the retail was just 89.00 for each one. The cops found no regulation that they couldn't honor their offer, so they did. He made 40.00 profit on each one he bought.

GarandOwner
September 18, 2008, 08:21 PM
I see the cops drumming up some bogus charge, fining you and making you leave!

Dont have to make it up "Loitering"

bogie
September 18, 2008, 08:41 PM
You better make sure you have an FFL. And a business license. And you better be prepared to prove that you are not buying stolen property. Probably a permit for sidewalk vending and a parade/demonstration permit would also be covering...

Personally, I'd hand out cards that say "Your Gun Might Be Worth Hundreds! Free appraisal by Federally Licensed Firearms Expert at Joe's Sporting Goods - (555) 555-1212"

GigaBuist
September 18, 2008, 08:49 PM
You better make sure you have an FFL. And a business license. And you better be prepared to prove that you are not buying stolen property. Probably a permit for sidewalk vending and a parade/demonstration permit would also be covering...

Wasn't looking to buy anything... just to offer advice.

blackhawk2000
September 18, 2008, 09:40 PM
Where is this at?

GigaBuist
September 18, 2008, 11:41 PM
It's in Kalamazoo.

rondog
September 18, 2008, 11:59 PM
I like the "handing out cards" idea! Surely that can't be illegal. And wouldn't a valid C&R license cover the purchase of vintage arms from private individuals? Not that FTF transactions are illegal anyway (in most places).

Nate C.
September 19, 2008, 12:14 AM
They don't do 'gun buybacks' in my part of the world. Yet.

Check back with me after the national election, though...

halfbreed808
September 19, 2008, 01:34 AM
Good luck on your educational awareness for seniors trip.:D

evan price
September 19, 2008, 01:45 AM
Unfortunately, your plan will do nothing for those blissninnies out there who would rather have the gun melted down into scrap than see anybody else ever have it. There's lots of them out there, some guy in California I think makes furniture and stuff out of guns people want destroyed symbolically.

Thernlund
September 19, 2008, 01:59 AM
http://www.flickr.com/photos/22507777@N02

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/03/17/DDB5VH7LM.DTL

Only in California. :rolleyes:


-T.

fizik
September 19, 2008, 02:18 AM
^^^wow, someone should donate guns to me :) i'll put them to good use and love them and feed them nice ammo and everything, not trash them like that. many guns are works of art as they are, they're scrap metal after he gets done.

Golden Hound
September 19, 2008, 03:22 AM
After Heath Maddox's father died unexpectedly in 2006, Maddox was clearing out his dad's belongings when he found a surprise: a U.S. military-issued .45-caliber handgun wrapped in a towel and tucked into a kitchen drawer.

Maddox vaguely recalled a story about his grandfather owning the gun, but he wasn't sure why, or how, it turned up in his father's kitchen.

Yet on a recent Friday evening, two years after the discovery, Maddox stood inside artist John Ricker's San Francisco studio, ready to smash the gun flat with a sledgehammer.

"My uncle wanted to keep it in the family," said Maddox, a planner in the city's transportation agency, before he delivered the first blow. "But I knew about John and what he does with guns. ... I wanted it destroyed."

:cuss:

Some people are just inhuman.

LKB3rd
September 19, 2008, 06:35 AM
I think you'd run into less risk of trouble if you had a "no buy" policy, and only told them the value, and maybe let them know how to sell legally to get the real value... and of course more importantly to prevent the police from destroying or taking them, paid for by the taxpayers, for themselves.
If done right, and legally, I think it is a great idea.

Steve Raacke
September 19, 2008, 06:43 AM
Quote:
After Heath Maddox's father died unexpectedly in 2006, Maddox was clearing out his dad's belongings when he found a surprise: a U.S. military-issued .45-caliber handgun wrapped in a towel and tucked into a kitchen drawer.

Maddox vaguely recalled a story about his grandfather owning the gun, but he wasn't sure why, or how, it turned up in his father's kitchen.

Yet on a recent Friday evening, two years after the discovery, Maddox stood inside artist John Ricker's San Francisco studio, ready to smash the gun flat with a sledgehammer.

"My uncle wanted to keep it in the family," said Maddox, a planner in the city's transportation agency, before he delivered the first blow. "But I knew about John and what he does with guns. ... I wanted it destroyed."


Some people are just inhuman.
I agree. Reading something like that makes me want to vomit. Seriously, I read that quote and felt sick to my stomach.

BigBlock
September 19, 2008, 07:17 AM
Might be a better idea to organize your own "gun buyback" and bring home a truck load of guns at 1/4 or less of their value.

BigBlock
September 19, 2008, 07:19 AM
Some people are just inhuman.

It's not inhuman, it's just blatantly stupid. Unfortunately MOST of the human race is blatantly stupid. :rolleyes:

Creade
September 19, 2008, 07:56 AM
I would go the business card route.
Its likely you'll end up with loitering charges, or atleast threatened with them if your just hanging around.

As for convincing people to take the guns elewhere to sell for more money.
Americans as a general rule are lazy. They are already there, and have the gun with them, why make another trip to make another $500 (sarcasm).
Also, some people just dont feel comfortable selling guns to anyone but law enforcement.


Recently a woman showed up at our local PD with a wooden crate.
What was inside you ask? An original Thomson Machine Gun, wrapped in grease paper, with spare drums. She didnt want anything for it, she just wanted it out of her closet now that her husband had passed.

Luckily, one of our officers took it upon himself to make sure this gun was never destroyed, and received the ok from the ATF to keep it in the dept, but obviously never carry on duty.

JWF III
September 19, 2008, 08:54 AM
I looked at the peace symbol in Thernlund's first link and noticed something. I am no expert on AKs by any means, but the bottom three legs of the symbol don't look like AKs to me. They have short front sights, the rear sights are of the elevator variety and mounted directly to the barrel, and there is no gas tube. My guess is they are of the Mauser variety, but without a close up it's hard to tell that. Can anyone verify that they are NOT AKs? I'd love to post a comment on the picture, and call the liberal anti exactly what he/she is, a liar. But I want to know, without a doubt, that I'm right.

Wyman

highorder
September 19, 2008, 10:17 AM
edited. I didn't have anything to add to the OP's questions.

fspitzdorf
September 19, 2008, 12:56 PM
Here's an article about the buy-back

http://www.mlive.com/kzgazette/news/index.ssf/2008/09/kalamazoo_department_of_public.html

Kalamazoo Department of Public Safety's gun amnesty buyback program is Saturday
by Rex Hall Jr. | Kalamazoo Gazette
Thursday September 18, 2008, 9:24 AM

KALAMAZOO -- No questions will be asked and police are offering money to residents who turn in guns Saturday during the Kalamazoo Department of Public Safety's Gun Amnesty Buyback Program, authorities said.

The event will be held from 1 to 6 p.m. at Public Safety's Training Division, 116 W. Cedar St. For residents who can't get to the training site, Public Safety officers will be available to pick up items at residents' homes.

Residents can turn in weapons, ammunition and explosives to the department without penalty, a news release said. The items will be destroyed.

Police are offering $25 for nonworking single-shot firearms and .22-caliber firearms; $50 for working handguns and multiple-shot long guns; $75 for handguns that hold 10 or more rounds; and $100 for assault weapons.

Police ask that residents place unloaded guns, ammunition and explosives in containers before bringing them to the training facility. Containers holding weapons should be placed in the trunks of vehicles, separate from ammunition, the news release said.

At the training center, police said, residents should inform a Public Safety officer that they have weapons to turn in, and the officer will remove them from their vehicles.

Erik Jensen
September 19, 2008, 03:14 PM
I gotta say, $100 for an actual assault weapon is pretty cheap. heck, the tax stamp alone costs twice that!






(sarcasm, of course..)

Shadowangel
September 19, 2008, 03:33 PM
Quote:
After Heath Maddox's father died unexpectedly in 2006, Maddox was clearing out his dad's belongings when he found a surprise: a U.S. military-issued .45-caliber handgun wrapped in a towel and tucked into a kitchen drawer.

Maddox vaguely recalled a story about his grandfather owning the gun, but he wasn't sure why, or how, it turned up in his father's kitchen.

Yet on a recent Friday evening, two years after the discovery, Maddox stood inside artist John Ricker's San Francisco studio, ready to smash the gun flat with a sledgehammer.

"My uncle wanted to keep it in the family," said Maddox, a planner in the city's transportation agency, before he delivered the first blow. "But I knew about John and what he does with guns. ... I wanted it destroyed."



Some people are just inhuman.


Ugh.. that makes me sick, too. That gun had been passed down through the generations until he got ahold of it and destroyed it. That is such a waste.

bogie
September 19, 2008, 03:42 PM
You know, that was an idea...

Run a classified ad - "Gun Buy Back - Federally Licensed Firearms Disposal Expert - will come to your house or business" and see how it does...

RPCVYemen
September 19, 2008, 03:51 PM
They are already there, and have the gun with them, why make another trip to make another $500 (sarcasm).
Also, some people just dont feel comfortable selling guns to anyone but law enforcement.

I think the second is the motivation of most people who go to a gun buyback - they have no use for the weapon, and they want to be very sure that they are not selling the gun to a criminal.

I will get flamed for this, but I think that gun buybacks - for that reason - are valuable service. As a means for folks to safely dispose of weapons they don't want around, I support them.

I would take a gun to a buyback before I sold it to anyone other than a close friend.

Mike

highorder
September 19, 2008, 04:53 PM
I would take a gun to a buyback before I sold it to anyone other than a close friend.

Honestly?

You'd sell a $500 rifle for $50 instead of bringing it to a gun store where they would give you $300?

OOOXOOO
September 19, 2008, 05:00 PM
Bogie
I was thinking the same thing, why don't I setup my own gun buy back. Who knows what you could get. Think of the children(my children).

Sistema1927
September 19, 2008, 05:02 PM
"My uncle wanted to keep it in the family," said Maddox, a planner in the city's transportation agency, before he delivered the first blow. "But I knew about John and what he does with guns. ... I wanted it destroyed."

Here is what was redacted by the ellipsis:

"Besides, who wants a gun made by a sewing machine company?" :what:

Erik Jensen
September 19, 2008, 05:36 PM
[QUOTE]"Besides, who wants a gun made by a sewing machine company?" /QUOTE]

LOL!

highorder
September 19, 2008, 06:59 PM
"Besides, who wants a gun made by a sewing machine company?"

If that was a Singer...

:what::fire::banghead::cuss::confused::fire::what::cuss::banghead::scrutiny::uhoh:

stampsm
September 19, 2008, 07:37 PM
You know, that was an idea...

Run a classified ad - "Gun Buy Back - Federally Licensed Firearms Disposal Expert - will come to your house or business" and see how it does...

be very careful about your wording, you dont want to be caught saying something that is not true such as being a "Federally Licensed Firearms Disposal Expert" the federal gov. does not license anyone in firearm disposal.

eng23ine
September 20, 2008, 03:25 AM
Federally Licensed, Firearms Disposal Expert.

How's that?

I am federally licensed...C&R

I am also a self proclaimed firearms disposal "expert".

Amazing what can be done with a comma, aint it?

Golden Hound
September 20, 2008, 07:38 AM
These are some clever ideas but really they're kind of unethical and deceptive. Here's what I would do: print up flyers or run an ad in the local paper, in a city where buy-backs are going on, simply informing people that the guns that they might have lying around could be very valuable either monetarily or as family heirlooms, and that they should think twice about selling them for peanuts.

Vibe
September 20, 2008, 08:12 AM
I'm glad that face to face, person to person sales are not regulated in AR. But then again, we don't have many blissninny "gun buy backs" here either. I have enough parts frames/basket case guns to warrant me being in line, and enough "spare change" to pick up something better.

jonmerritt
September 20, 2008, 11:07 AM
If you check the BATF laws, these gun buy backs are way outside the law!!

ljnowell
September 20, 2008, 01:18 PM
Why dont they call gun "buy backs" what they really are? Its nothing but compensated willing confiscation. Keep the sheeple unarmed.

bogie
September 20, 2008, 01:22 PM
Well, that's because they're thinking in terms of public relations and advertising and communications, and they're giving their "customer base" what they want to hear.

Gunnies don't seem to understand that concept. They don't understand that, in general, a flanking maneuver is the best way to approach a thorny issue. Nope. They insist on repeated charges, straight up the middle, until they lose, and then they blame the antigunners.

We're still using WWI tactics in today's battle for gun rights. No bloody wonder we keep losing stupid little battles that should be easy wins.

highorder
September 22, 2008, 11:38 AM
Did anyone go to this thing? what was the mood? See any interesting items?

I picture old ladies with STG-44's...

walksbyhimself
September 22, 2008, 01:30 PM
"The piece includes curving AK-47s Ricker purchased from a Czech arms dealer, a pancake-flat .357 Magnum allegedly owned by Hunter S. Thompson, a .38 Special from a former San Francisco police officer and a pearl-plated pistol once carried by an officer in the Italian National Fascist Party."

Pearl-plated? ***?

spuscg
September 22, 2008, 01:33 PM
id stay and buy some myself, pay a little more than the buyback and way less tahn a store...........not that my gun loving state does buybacks

hankdatank1362
September 22, 2008, 01:42 PM
Well, at least all the homies know it's okay to rob Heath Maddox's house, because he sure doesn't keep any weapons there. Heck, they could follow him home one night, seeing as how they know he works in the City Transportation Authority Office.

Just because this guy wanted to be a dee-dee-dee, and trash something his grandfather obviously thought was important enough to hang onto after all these years, now everyone know he's unarmed, where he works, (wouldn't be too hard to find where he lives)... he's just waiting to be robbed.

Hey-Zeus, people like this get the best of me! His grandfather is probably doing 1600 RPM right now.... Dangit, if his daddy is still around, he oughtta slap that boy's jaws broke!:banghead::banghead::banghead::fire::fire::fire:

RPCVYemen
September 22, 2008, 02:21 PM
You'd sell a $500 rifle for $50 instead of bringing it to a gun store where they would give you $300?

Good question - I am not sure. I don't have any $500 rifles. I have sold one weapon to a friend (a CZ-52), and I sold it to him at a pretty big (percentage) loss for $25. That's only because he wouldn't take it for free.

If he hadn't taken it, it would have gone to a buyback or a sledgehammer.

I am not advocating this for anyone else, but as an ethical issue, I would not ever want to sell a weapon to someone who uses it to commit a crime - regardless of the legal issues.

I wouldn't sell a gun on consignment in a gun shop - not sure what I would do if a gun shop wanted to buy the weapon directly.

Mike

RPCVYemen
September 22, 2008, 02:50 PM
Run a classified ad - "Gun Buy Back - Federally Licensed Firearms Disposal Expert - will come to your house or business" and see how it does...

I think that if you could do that and make any money at it - or wanted to do it gratis :) - you would be performing a service that is valuable to folks who want to dispose of guns they don't want. I'd much rather see a private entity do this than spend public money on it.

The hurdle - other than making enough money at it to be able to keep doing it - would be to be able to convince your customers that you were going to be as careful about disposing of their weapons as they believe the police to (whether they are right about that or not).

The first time one of your customers was contact by police because the weapon was used in a crime after being re-sold, or that your customers even heard a rumor that you were reselling weapons, I think your business model would be shot.

Remember, you are not trying to convince gunnies to use your service - most of them are perfectly willing to and know how to sell guns. You are trying to attract customers that are either not willing or don't know how to sell guns through normal channels.

Given all that, if you can make business of this - go for it. I would support - and suspect a lot of people would support - municipalities contracting out this service.

I think that you'd have a hard time making the business model work. While I am sure that there are occasional gems, I bet that they are few and far between. I think you'd be doing a lot of paperwork for a lot of junk.

Mike

highorder
September 22, 2008, 03:14 PM
I am not advocating this for anyone else, but as an ethical issue, I would not ever want to sell a weapon to someone who uses it to commit a crime - regardless of the legal issues.


So you buy only new cars, and drive them all the way to the junk heap? You can't sell something as dangerous as a car without feeling the same ethical dillema.

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