turret presses


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cajun 48
September 18, 2008, 09:23 PM
Seriously thinking about getting into reloading. What would be a good starter press? Will be loading .45acp only (for now). Only shoot appx 200 rounds a month. Was looking at a four hole lee turret, but am open to suggestions. Thanks.

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mbpautz762
September 18, 2008, 09:26 PM
that's the same press I have - it was also my first. It's worked great so far - I load a little more at about 300 a month or so. I decided to invest in a Lyman 1200 DPS powder dispenser too - sped everything up and it's very accurate! the only beef I have with that press is the priming system - one by one gets old quick :(

TX1911fan
September 18, 2008, 09:29 PM
That press works great for me.

zxcvbob
September 18, 2008, 09:35 PM
I'd recommend something like this:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=220282021233

I have an older 3-hole version of this press and I love it. I can load 100 rounds in a half hour with it, and that includes setup time. (but to be honest I don't like to go that fast with it) I also have a progressive press, but I still use the C&H about as much as the progressive because I tend to do about 50 at a time of a lot of different loads.

Phil A
September 18, 2008, 09:37 PM
If you decide to get the Lee turret press make sure you get the Classic Cast version. It's much better. - Phil

benzuncle
September 18, 2008, 09:45 PM
There are a lot of really good presses out there. You will more than likely hear from the fans of every "color". I did a lot of research online; I wasn't a fan of any of them. It finally came down to cost for what I wanted to accomplish. The Lee Classic Turret Press was the one I chose. And I was going to be loading 45ACP just as you. The Lee Classic Turret Press is a semi-progressive press. You can still use is as a single-stage press if you choose to. Once I had the 45 figured out and loading nicely (which didn't take long at all) I added a second turret and the carbide dies for 380ACP. The swap out is very quick and easy. I don't hurry when reloading, but still manage 100-150 rounds in one hour. I had envisioned using the Lee Classic Turret Press for a while then moving up to one of the other brands. But, as I have had no problems with the Classic, and it makes fine ammo, I currently don't see the need to change. Keep doing your due dilegence. Brian Enos can give you the skinny on the Dillon equipment. Very good stuff as are most all of the major brands. Good luck with your research/decision. Let us know...

Grumulkin
September 18, 2008, 09:58 PM
I have a Redding T-7 turret press and it's great. I've found the 7 stations VERY handy.

aerod1
September 18, 2008, 11:21 PM
You have chosen a very good press in the Lee Classic Cast Turret. I have one that has performed flawlessly.:D

ultramag44
September 18, 2008, 11:56 PM
You have chosen a very good press in the Lee Classic Cast Turret. I have one that has performed flawlessly.


What he said, yeah, what he said! :D

bobotech
September 18, 2008, 11:59 PM
I wish that Hornday would make a Turrent style press with their lock and load bushings. That would be darned nifty.

rondog
September 19, 2008, 12:12 AM
x2 on the Lee Classic Turret Press! I bought the kit from Cabela's, it has the scales, powder measure and primer feeders, but I'm not sure it's the best deal out there. http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0044122216337a&type=product&cmCat=SEARCH_all&returnPage=search-results1.jsp&%2Fcabelas%2Fcommerce%2FCabelasCatalogNumberFinder.giftCertificateURL=%2Fcabelas%2Fen%2Ftemplates%2Fgiftcertificate%2Fgiftcertificate.jsp%3Fid%3D0005586990011a%26podId%3D0005586%26catalogCode%3DIB%26navAction%3Djump%26indexId%3D&Ntk=Products_liberal&QueryText=lee+classic+turret+press&sort=all&_D%3AhasJS=+&N=0&_D%3A%2Fcabelas%2Fcommerce%2FCabelasCatalogNumberFinder.giftCertificateURL=+&Nty=1&hasJS=true&_DARGS=%2Fcabelas%2Fen%2Fcommon%2Fsearch%2Fsearch-box.jsp.form23&_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1 Still need dies and supplies. Then you'll want a tumbler, and more dies, and on and on and on and on. It's worse than crack!

lgbloader
September 19, 2008, 01:02 AM
It's worse than crack!

It's at least up there with nicotine and caffeine.

Seriously, the LEE Classic Turret sounds like it's right up your alley. If all your gonna handload is 200 rounds per month (which will double or even triple once you start doing it) you can handload that in 1 hour and a half's time from beginning to end. I bought this press for a buddy of mine as a birthday present and helped him set it up and have loaded with it and it's pretty cool. Seriously, 5 rounds per minute is about what these LCT load at a good pace and that is really all you need. It's plenty fast and strong enough. This press and a good single stage such as the Lee Classic single stage makes for a very nice bench.

Later on down the freeway, you can decide if you want to spend the big bucks on Stronger faster machines like the Reddings, RCBS or the fast green thingy or the other Red Fast thingy or the Blue thingy.

Cheers

everallm
September 19, 2008, 07:32 AM
Once you start you can't stop......

I have the 4 station turret for 9mm and .223 and so long as you remember, particularly during the early stages, do it slow and right not fast and wrong.

Definitely buy the ABC's or Reloading book and optionally the Lee reloading book.

I would recommend that you get a small digital scale, nothing wrong with the balance from Lee, just can take a lot of time to settle.

Also with a digital scale you can periodically weigh your empty and primed cartridge, reset to zero with the cartridge, throw powder, re-weigh and make sure your powder weight is still correct.

Ditto with a digital or dial caliper to check for OAK, Ebay or your local ACE can supply nice AND inexpensive.

wingman
September 19, 2008, 08:52 AM
If you want to purchase the classic check out this site lowest price and shipping is a set $13.49 or it was when I ordered.


http://www.factorysales.com

The Bushmaster
September 19, 2008, 09:23 AM
To solve the Boring Priming stage of the operation. Get a Lee single stage "O" press and a Lee Auto prime II...Prime as a seperate operation...Then move to the Lee Turret Classic Cast to complete the loading job...

BullsEye10x
September 19, 2008, 01:26 PM
+1000 on the Lee Classic (cast) Turret press! Be sure to get the Pro Auto Disc measure, as it's much better than the standard one.

rondog
September 19, 2008, 01:34 PM
All you have to do is remove the drive shaft on the Classic, and it works great as a single-stage. It just lifts out.

Buy some extra turrets, and you can do anything you want with it. I use mine to deprime all my cases first, then tumble them, them I'll prime all of them.

Once I have a bucket full of clean, primed cases, then I can start producing rounds with any powder/bullet/load combos I want to do.

Vern Humphrey
September 19, 2008, 01:40 PM
Turret presses are a good compromise between a single station press and a progressive.

With the Lee 4-holer, you can set up all the dies for one caliber (including a post-seating crimp die) and leave them set -- no need to unscrew and readjust when you change dies. You can buy additional heads, one for each caliber you own and simply switch heads.

RPCVYemen
September 19, 2008, 01:58 PM
I wish that Hornaday would make a Turrent style press with their lock and load bushings.

Actually I have Lyman T-Mag that a friend gave me, which has been fine. But I look at the Hornaday LnL Classic with envy - to my mind, if the LnL works the way it's been advertised, it looks like a more elegant solution to the "change dies quickly" problem than a turret.

The turret, at least the one I have, just creates a system that allows me to leave a bunch of dies pre-adjusted, and to switch between the dies pretty quickly.

Doesn't LnL give me the same benefit with a whole lot less mechanism?

By the way, that's a question, not an argument

I am not quite sure how the LnL works, but can't you adjust your dies once, and leave them in some bushing that slips in and out of the press?

It seems as though - if I understand the LnL - slipping the bushings in and out of the LnL press is logically the equivalent of turning the turret?

If that's true, then the turret substitutes a big hunk of moving cast iron for the bushing. While the concern is largely theoretical, since that big hunk of cast iron has to be able to spin, then you've introduced an axle that can flex a little, etc. Looks like more moving parts to me.

Does a turret have any advantage over an LnL Classic?

Mike

zxcvbob
September 19, 2008, 02:21 PM
Does a turret have any advantage over an LnL Classic?


If the turret auto-indexes and you load each round all-the-way one at a time, the turret will be much faster. If you size/prime a whole reloading block of cartridges, change the die and expand/drop-powder them all, change the die again and seat/crimp, there's not much difference and the turret has got to have more slop to it (maybe not significant, I dunno.)

The LNL bushings are nice, but they are not that big of an improvement over using big locking rings with a set screw. I put Lyman or Forster rings on all my Lee crimp dies.

Vern Humphrey
September 19, 2008, 02:35 PM
The real advantage of turret presses is that you don't need to stop and change dies during the reloading process. When you add removable heads, where dies can be left set up, that gives you a big advantage.

RPCVYemen
September 19, 2008, 03:04 PM
If the turret auto-indexes and you load each round all-the-way one at a time, the turret will be much faster. If you size/prime a whole reloading block of cartridges, change the die and expand/drop-powder them all, change the die again and seat/crimp, there's not much difference and the turret has got to have more slop to it (maybe not significant, I dunno.)

Mine isn't auto-indexing, and I tend to batch the operations - de-prime/resize all; tumble all; drop powder in 100; set bullet in 100; crimp 100.

So the turret is of no particular (over LnL), and like you, I think it must have more slop.

I guess I need to find somebody locally that has Hornaday LnL classic who thinks a turret will be the cat's pajamas. :) Then we can swap.

Mike

RustyFN
September 19, 2008, 09:02 PM
I would get one of these.
http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b8da27b3127ccec398914a0e3000000010O00DZOGblm4Yg9vPhI/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D480/ry%3D320/
Rusty

cajun 48
September 20, 2008, 06:25 AM
Thanks to all who responded! Nice to know I'll be making a good buy when I get it. Special thanks to everallm for the tip on how to use a digital scale to check loads. Sure will be the heck of a lot better than dumping/weighing/pour it back in. Thanks again! Another special thanks to bushmaster of the tip on using a single stage to size and decap. Many thanks!
Rusty I can only hope I'll have that many turrets! Nice bench!
Again thanks to all the info was great and helped a bunch.

71Commander
September 20, 2008, 07:04 AM
I have the Redding T-7 turret press. It's slicker than dog poop.:p

James Thomson
September 20, 2008, 08:03 AM
I've been reloading for 40 years and have owned a ton of presses. I started out with a Lyman 310 tool that was so labor intensive and slow it wasn't hardly worth it. I bought a RCBS Rock Chucker and still have a beef up version of it in the Big MAX. You can't go wrong with a single stage even if you get progressives later. I still use it for depriming and loading rifle. I got a Dillon 550 I use for .223 as well as 44 Mag. I recently purchased the Dillon 650 and I have it set up for 9MM. You will grow as you go along. I love my Dillons for progressives. Dillon has a no BS warranty for life and I know others have similar warranties but I've seen Dillon come through every time. One thing, electronics like digital scales usually carry a one or two year warranty and I think that's standard across the industry.

The Bushmaster
September 20, 2008, 10:06 AM
Cajun 48...Do not use a scale to check loaded rounds to see if you have the correct amount of powder in them...Each component will not weigh the same and the difference can give you a bad or false indication...

This is a great hab...hobby. Enjoy...

bobotech
September 20, 2008, 10:51 AM
Actually I have Lyman T-Mag that a friend gave me, which has been fine. But I look at the Hornaday LnL Classic with envy - to my mind, if the LnL works the way it's been advertised, it looks like a more elegant solution to the "change dies quickly" problem than a turret.

The turret, at least the one I have, just creates a system that allows me to leave a bunch of dies pre-adjusted, and to switch between the dies pretty quickly.

Doesn't LnL give me the same benefit with a whole lot less mechanism?

By the way, that's a question, not an argument

I am not quite sure how the LnL works, but can't you adjust your dies once, and leave them in some bushing that slips in and out of the press?

It seems as though - if I understand the LnL - slipping the bushings in and out of the LnL press is logically the equivalent of turning the turret?

If that's true, then the turret substitutes a big hunk of moving cast iron for the bushing. While the concern is largely theoretical, since that big hunk of cast iron has to be able to spin, then you've introduced an axle that can flex a little, etc. Looks like more moving parts to me.

Does a turret have any advantage over an LnL Classic?

Mike

Purely convenience. I love my lock and load bushings. I won't go back to anything else. That is one of the reasons why I don't get a turrent. I just love being able to just unlock and lock in a die without the annoyance of screwing it all the way in our out. So quick to change dies compared to any other method.

I would like a turrent with the same die bushings so that I could still get the benefits of turrents without having to unscrew the lock bushing off of my dies.

In a nutshell, a turrent with lock and load bushings would be the best of all the worlds short of progressive. For the record, I have a Lock and Load AP progressive that I mainly use, but I like to use my single stage for big loads and stuff that I don't shoot a billion of.

RustyFN
September 20, 2008, 12:13 PM
Cajun 48...Do not use a scale to check loaded rounds to see if you have the correct amount of powder in them...Each component will not weigh the same and the difference can give you a bad or false indication...
I agree with Bushmaster. Weighing loaded rounds does not work, especially for pistol ammo.
Rusty

cajun 48
September 20, 2008, 04:30 PM
for rusty and bushmaster. Wasn't going to weigh "loaded" rounds. What I ment was to measure after dropping the charge and before bellmouth/seat the bullet. If I use the same brand cases wouldn't that be as accurate as pouring the powder charge on the scale? Or am I miss reading everallm's comment? ajb

The Bushmaster
September 20, 2008, 05:23 PM
cajun 48...Go to your loading bench and weigh a bunch of cases with the same head stamp. Even those from the same box will be +/- .5 to 2.0 grains of center...Which will give you as much as 4 grains difference or more...Answer? No...

Eagle103
September 20, 2008, 05:45 PM
Get a book like the ABC's of Reloading along with Speer's 14 or Lyman's 48 or 49 and read everything before you start. Do not come up with your own ideas how things should be done. That's a sure way to get into trouble. You need to take this hobby seriously. I don't mean to sound condescending. It's just a learning curve that we all go through that isn't very forgiving to mistakes.

I have a Lee Classic Turret and it's worked very well. You could start out using it single stage using the batch method and work into auto indexing later. I like the kit from Kempf's.
https://kempfgunshop.com//index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=shop.flypage&product_id=630&category_id=26&manufacturer_id=0&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=41
You'll also need a scale. I have the RCBS (Ohaus) 505 and it has worked great. The reviews on Lee's "Safety Scale" are mixed. The "adjustable charge bar" is something I would also recommend. Have fun and be safe.:)

ranger335v
September 20, 2008, 05:57 PM
"I am not quite sure how the LnL works, but can't you adjust your dies once, and leave them in some bushing that slips in and out of the press?"

Since every die on the market already has a locking adjustment ring, all the LnL, etc., inserts can do is inject another piece of metal into an already rediculously simple die changing system.

If you batch load with a turret, as you should, the lost time spent changing dies by screwing them in and out vs. twisting a turret two or three steps is awfully small, even if the turret should be instantaneous. And it isn't.

I rarely use my turret anymore, it offers nothing to a day of loading.

FlyinBryan
September 20, 2008, 06:11 PM
I agree with Bushmaster. Weighing loaded rounds does not work, especially for pistol ammo.
Rusty


and i agree with both of them. the only way to check your powder charge is to weigh ONLY the powder.

variations from case to case, even from the same mfgr, will get you in trouble. like bushmaster said, easily a 4g swing.

realtordoug
September 20, 2008, 06:25 PM
+1 for Kempfs...After reading through these threads, ordered the Lee Classic Turret Kit - kempfgunshop.com - good price and superfast shipping - also 1000 .38 SWC - no turning back now! (waiting on powder and primers from Grafs)...Until they arrive I'll also be absorbing as much info as possible.

RustyFN
September 20, 2008, 07:45 PM
I have been loading on a classic turret for two years. I use the pro auto disk measure. I have been using fine powders like Titegroup, W748 and H335 and once the measure is set for the charge I want it will throw that charge all day with no variation. There really isn't a lot of powder measuring required. It's good to check the drop once in a while but you won't be measuring powder that much.
Rusty

cajun 48
September 21, 2008, 04:46 PM
bushmaster, rusty and eagle tks for looking out for the reloading newbee. if more forums had "them what care types" we'd all be better off. gee dad (eagle) this old fart understands that firm caring and concern never crosses the line to condisending (sp). TKS bunches! ajb

DaveInFloweryBranchGA
September 21, 2008, 10:41 PM
I own a Hornady LnL. I also own a Lee Classic Turret Press. I love both of them, for different reasons and use both, for different cartridges and loads.

My advise to anyone using the Lee Classic Turret is to use it with a Pro Auto Disk, an auto disk riser and a Lee Safety Prime setup. Additionally, if you later decide to use extruded powders that don't load well with the Pro Auto Disk, you can pick up a Hornady LnL Case activated powder drop and an RCBS Uniflow for the extruded powder handling.

These setups have worked very well for me and have produced very accurate ammo.

Regards,

Dave

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