Reliable, Tough BP Revolver?


PDA






Cosmoline
September 20, 2008, 05:39 PM
I'm looking to expand my smoke pole activities to include cap n' ball revolvers. I've never shot one before, I'm ashamed to say. And other than some basic history I don't know much about them. What I'm wondering is which one is the most trouble-free/ jam-free and toughest for shooting.

If you enjoyed reading about "Reliable, Tough BP Revolver?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
scrat
September 20, 2008, 08:44 PM
regardless of which one you get your going to have some problems with jaming and fail to fires. there are things you can do to prevent some of it. well i have 4 revolvers for the past year everytime i go out to the range the revolver that outshoots and last longer than all of my revolvers put together is my 1851 pietta. Its just nails tough. i have shot more rounds through it than any other gun. i purposely took them all out and shot them until i could not. no cleaning at all. in the afternoon. evertime. i am left shooting the 1851 pietta. it never has jamed yet. just keeps on shooting.
as far as ftf. its had them they all have but i have yet to have it jam up on me.

PRM
September 20, 2008, 09:53 PM
Lot of threads on this. Some prefer the Colt (open top) style revolvers while others are going to be equally loyal to the Remington (closed frame) types. They are both good choices. Handle some of each type and see which one "talks to you." If you don't like the way it feels and is balanced - you probably won't be happy over the long haul. I prefer the Navy Colts, and Pocket Models - got a friend who has large hands and prefers the Remingtons. All personal choice. If I was looking at the Colt style - I would as a personal choice buy a Colt Second Generation or a Third Generation Colt Signature Series. They are a little higher - but you have a genuine Colt and a gun that will be more collectible over time.

theotherwaldo
September 20, 2008, 10:20 PM
My favorite shooter is an old '58 Remington. It points naturally and hits what I point at. The only problem is that it starts binding up after about two dozen shots and needs a bit of cleaning before I can go on.
My '51 Colt doesn't point as well or hit as consistently, but it keeps running long after the Remington is all bound up.
My Ruger Old Army mostly just sits in its box. I don't know why it doesn't appeal to me. Maybe it's all that stainless steel, I dunno.
Anyway, that's my personal opinion.

scrat
September 20, 2008, 10:27 PM
My '51 Colt doesn't point as well or hit as consistently, but it keeps running long after the Remington is all bound up.

thats why i say a 1851. my 1851 has out shot every gun i own. That is in black powder.

Voodoochile
September 20, 2008, 10:48 PM
I like them all my self with only a few exceptions but all of my C&B revolvers get the harsh treatment:
Shoot till it can't shoot no more then wipe em down a bit & do it again.
Sometimes have a range session of heavy loads.
I'll sometimes carry one Loaded to the club property to scout for stands or do some trappin & if it rains on me I just wipe em down a little to keep em from rusting when I get home.

26 years with my Pietta '60 Army
23 years with my Pietta '58 NMA
19 years with my Uberti 3rd. Model Dragoon
1 year with my Pietta '58 NMA 5-1/2 barreled

I've had a 2 hand springs, 1 trigger/bolt spring & a main spring fail on me in that time, as long as you keep a few spare parts handy for such an occasion & realize that they are 19th century designs that with some basic maintenence & knowledge these fine weapons are almost as reliable as many of todays designed firearms.

For the most part a Colt will out last a Remington in shots between cleanings but if you had a Remington with a few spare cylinders then this is but a moot point, accuracy wise they both share the same type of sights & in the right hands can be shot with similar accuracy to todays IPSC pistols "just not as fast."

I personally like my Remington copies because of how they fit my hands, cylinder swapping capability, & all around good looks but I also like my '60 army because it is the sleekest & smoothest of all of my pieces.

4v50 Gary
September 20, 2008, 10:56 PM
Ruger Old Army. Modern design and Ruger tough. That I haven't blown myself up or injured myself from my foolish youth is testimony to the design.

Smokin_Gun
September 21, 2008, 12:46 AM
My Ruger Old Army mostly just sits in its box. I don't know why it doesn't appeal to me. Maybe it's all that stainless steel, I dunno.

Sites or no sites? 5.5" or 7.5" bbl?

Interested in anything else?

SG

Smokin_Gun
September 21, 2008, 12:51 AM
I've never shot one before

Get yourself an 1858 Remington .44 7.5" bbl...you'll stay happy.

SG

arcticap
September 21, 2008, 01:52 AM
And I thought that the Rogers & Spencer was the best revolver! :D

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=240556&highlight=rogers+spencer

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=378794&highlight=rogers+spencer

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=341783

Smokin_Gun
September 21, 2008, 02:13 AM
And I thought that the Rogers & Spencer was the best revolver!

Not by me...I'll take a Euroarms or ASP 1858 Rem .44 or .36 any day over them Euroarms R&S concoctions.:D
Want accuracy, dependability, and ease of disassy/assy? 1858 Remington any brand...:neener:
http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c277/Smokin_Gun/07-11-08_0622.jpg
http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c277/Smokin_Gun/09-02-08_1712.jpg

SG

scrat
September 21, 2008, 11:41 AM
nice pics sg

K.A.T.
September 21, 2008, 12:01 PM
Well, you will get a lot of different answers on this one. I'm a Colt man myself, I really like the look and feel of them. I also have a Uberti Stainless Steel 1858, like it too. For the first timer I would say get the 1858 rem., easier to use and less trouble.

I'm going to warn you thou, it is an additcion. If you buy the rem., you will be curious about the Colt and have to have one. Then when you get the 1860, you will have to have a 1851 and so on. It never stops, so you've been warned, good luck. hehehe! Hear goes another one to the dark side.:D

DrLaw
September 21, 2008, 12:34 PM
Second to everybody that has said something already.

It's messy. Prepare to get your fingers dirty. There is just no real clean way to shoot a black powder pistol's second cylinder save for wearing gloves. Once you start reloading the cylinder, you'll see why.

Its' addictive. You will have tons more smoke than with modern smokeless, and that, in and of itself, creates some of the fun 'atmosphere' of B-P.

Open or closed top. Both have their fans. Both are fun, both will last you a lifetime.

If you buy, don't go cheap. Get Uberti or Pietta for a pistol, or Pedersoli if you are going with single shots, although Lyman makes a good single shot pistol, too. You will need a lead melting pot, and a mold, too. Lee makes it simple and easy to mold bullets.

There are different calibers. .44 and .36 are the largest generally in pistols, with .31 also following behind. Don't be awed by the .44. They shoot smooth and easy. A lot of people start with .36 though as there are many makes of .36 out there and plenty of good ones at that, Colt, Remington, and Spiller and Burr. In .44, there are Colt, Remington, Rogers and Spencer, LeMat and other replicas.

It's a Pandora's box, but of delights! :evil:

Jump on into the Black Powder waters. You'll love it!

The Doc is out now. :cool:

Cosmoline
September 21, 2008, 02:19 PM
Thanks for that input! It gives me a better idea of what folks are really using out there.

DixieTexian
September 21, 2008, 04:32 PM
Just go to the gun shop. Hold a few and talk sexy to them. The one that talks sexy back to you is the one you want.

6Gun4Fun
September 21, 2008, 04:53 PM
The great thing about making an Old Army your first gun is you won't be left wondering if you should have bought one.

The Lone Haranguer
September 21, 2008, 05:13 PM
If you are not concerned about it having a resemblance to guns of the past, I can't imagine anything stronger than the Ruger Old Army. I understand they are now discontinued, but there are plenty still around.

Cosmoline
September 21, 2008, 10:02 PM
Is the Old Army pretty much a blackhawk frame with a blackpowder body added?

arcticap
September 21, 2008, 10:17 PM
Pretty much, since the grips are interchangable IIRC.

StrawHat
September 22, 2008, 09:59 AM
What I'm wondering is which one is the most trouble-free/ jam-free and toughest for shooting.

As much as I prefer historical pieces, the revolver that fits your criteria is the discontinued Ruger Old Army.

Never owned one but friends that have all report it is well designed and nearly tropuble free.

gizamo
September 22, 2008, 06:14 PM
Have a few open and closed top Uberti's and one Pietta. All are fun to shoot. But I have 2 Ruger Old Armies and would recommend them to a newer shooter in a heartbeat. Easy dissemble and easy clean. Ruger Strong and reliable.

Giz

FSCJedi
September 22, 2008, 11:15 PM
Just go to the gun shop. Hold a few and talk sexy to them. The one that talks sexy back to you is the one you want.
BEST. EXCUSE. EVER!

Me personally, I like the '51 Navy. I've got a Pietta that has performed pretty flawlessly since I got it. I've been dying to get back to the states so I can shoot her some more (and maybe a new brace of '51s to go with her).

Ray P
September 22, 2008, 11:47 PM
The only thing no one has mentioned yet is: Stay away from the brass-framed 44s if you intend to shoot heavy loads. Steel frame is the best way to go, Colt or Remington.

Cosmoline
September 23, 2008, 12:34 AM
I am interested in the ROA, but the moutainy men would make fun of me at the next rondez-vous.

6Gun4Fun
September 23, 2008, 01:14 AM
They made a really nice version with fixed iron sights rather then then target sights. I've been thinking about one of those for a long time. I have another with a brass trigger guard that adds a nice accent to the blue finish.

JNewell
September 23, 2008, 08:36 PM
Definitely the Ruger. Strong, simple, almost foolproof. Like the man says, there are lots of the fixed sight versions out there in stainless and blued steel.

crstrode
September 23, 2008, 09:10 PM
I bought my first cap and ball revolver on a whim.

I took a peek at the latest Cabelas catalog and picked out the 1851 Navy colt.

My reason? This is the gun the Wild Bill Hickok used - and used it well.

I got lucky! This is my favorite cap and ball pistol. I've got several cap and ball revolvers in several different styles.

They all work well, shoot well and are loads of fun.

My Pietta 1851 Nayv Colt in .36 caliber with a steel frame is by far my favorite.

I can't tell you just what it is that makes this model special, but there sure is some good mojo in this design. It feels good, shoots good, and looks very cool!

Yup - cap and ball revolvers are addictive! MUCH more fun than modern pistols. Loading tinkering cleaning, learning the tricks and techniques is as much of the experience as the shooting itself.

Omnivore
September 23, 2008, 09:45 PM
Heck with it. Get one of each and then you can decide which one you like best. Just don't put yourself in a position where you have to clean all of them in one evening.

The Lone Haranguer
September 23, 2008, 09:54 PM
A "jam-free" cap-and-ball revolver is a little oxymoronic, since fragments of spent percussion caps tend to fall into the action and tie it up, even the Old Army. There is a reason why the self-contained metallic cartridge was such a huge advance in firearm design. ;)

DixieTexian
September 24, 2008, 02:33 AM
A "jam-free" cap-and-ball revolver is a little oxymoronic, since fragments of spent percussion caps tend to fall into the action and tie it up, even the Old Army. There is a reason why the self-contained metallic cartridge was such a huge advance in firearm design.

That, and it might have had a bit to do with reloading times...

Smokin_Gun
September 24, 2008, 02:51 AM
A "jam-free" cap-and-ball revolver is a little oxymoronic, since fragments of spent percussion caps tend to fall into the action and tie it up, even the Old Army. There is a reason why the self-contained metallic cartridge was such a huge advance in firearm design.


I believe that in all the Xcitement ya left out an important word in yur oxymoron... (Most)
most trouble-free/ jam-free and toughest for shooting

The answer of course is Remington in the 19th & 20th Century ... yes even over the 20th Century BP ROA from Ruger in the late mid 1900's and I like Ruger ... Rems are much easier to field strip and troubleshoot. I like my ROA but like my Rems more ... Both are just a differant kinda better in the likin' of a Rev.
Two thumbs up for the 1858 Remington.

If you enjoyed reading about "Reliable, Tough BP Revolver?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!