Dragoon Revolvers


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English Phil
October 2, 2008, 06:46 PM
Hi,
Please could someone explain the difference between the three models of Dragoon.
Thanks.

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scrat
October 2, 2008, 07:24 PM
Eli Whitney, Jr. manufactured the first run of 1848 Dragoons for Colt at his Whitneyville factory in Connecticut. The single action revolver was a transitional model that improved on the Colt Walker. This earliest Dragoon had an improved loading lever, a shorter cylinder, and weighed less.

Small improvements continued, separating each of the Dragoon models. Next came the 1st Model Dragoon, with oval bolt slots. The 2nd Model Dragoon used squared cylinder bolt slots. The 3rd Model Dragoon single actions incorporated round trigger guards

StrawHat
October 3, 2008, 01:07 PM
Interesting sidenote, the nomenclature 1st, 2nd, 3rd, was never used by Colts but came along later when collectors needed to differ the many revolvers.

There is also some overlap in design features when they were using up old parts after a new detail was introduced.

Someone ought to be able to post photos to help you better understand the differences.

scrat
October 3, 2008, 03:46 PM
check uberti website

Calibre44
October 3, 2008, 04:28 PM
Are you thinking of getting one?

Smokin_Gun
October 4, 2008, 12:50 AM
Colt Signature Dragoon 1st Model with oval cylinder Bolthead and slots and transitional rounded triggerguard. All matching numbers from Colt.
Oval cylinder is cap & ball, cylinder w/ square slots in rev is R&D Conversion
.45 Colt Cart.
http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c277/Smokin_Gun/Colt3rdDragoonPlusRDconvertion-1.jpg

SG

Old Fuff
October 4, 2008, 09:40 AM
Of the various Dragoon models (Colt called them "Holster Pistols - as in "saddle holster") only the last ones (3rd model) had an oval trigger guard.

In the original 19th century 1st issue guns serial numbers ranged from about 10,200 to 19.600 - give or take.

I wouldn't nick-pick except that the purpose of the thread is to define the differences between the different (so called) models.

English Phil
October 4, 2008, 03:44 PM
Many thanks for the replies, I may obtain one early next year,

Smokin_Gun
October 4, 2008, 08:28 PM
Of the various Dragoon models (Colt called them "Holster Pistols - as in "saddle holster") only the last ones (3rd model) had an oval trigger guard.

In the original 19th century 1st issue guns serial numbers ranged from about 10,200 to 19.600 - give or take.

.

Except in the 19th Century production the overlap of models did show up as strawhat mentioned...the Horse Pistols.

There is also some overlap in design features when they were using up old parts after a new detail was introduced

SG

Old Fuff
October 4, 2008, 08:50 PM
There was some overlapping of serial numbers between the (so called by collectors) 2nd and 3rd models, but the 3rd was the last made during the 19th century, and the oval trigger guard was what defined it from the others.

Smokin_Gun
October 5, 2008, 03:16 AM
There is also some overlap in design features when they were using up old parts after a new detail was introduced

I'll try this again...see the above statement again? a 1st, 2nd, or 3rd model so called could have been produced, made, sold, or given away, with a frame, cyl. and innerds from a 1st model and assembled on Dec31,1850 with a round (new design feature using old parts) trigger guard of a 3rd model Dragoon. Did I say more clearly?

SG

The one I had picture is a Colt Signature Series 1st model Dragoon with a 3rd Model Dragoon T/G...I was told had it not been fired with all matching S/N's Grip, Frame, T/G, BBL. and Cylinder it would have been worth money to a collector...it was definately a Colt production Blooper. Valued at about $550 now.

SG

Old Fuff
October 5, 2008, 10:10 AM
The one I had picture is a Colt Signature Series 1st model Dragoon with a 3rd Model Dragoon T/G...I

Enough! We have a tempest in a teapot going here... :D

Refering to the original 19th century revolvers, not recent Signature Series reproductions, which might be almost anything...

Of course there can be exceptions to the rules, but this thread wasn't about exceptions. The original post wanted to know what was the difference between the (collector defined) 1st, 2nd and 3rd model Colt Dragoons.

It is presumed that all of the 3rd. model variant had oval trigger guards, regardless of the serial number. If an identical revolver had a square-back guard it would be calssified as a 2nd model.

It should be remembered that Colt didn't use the 1st, 2nd and 3rd model designations. Sometimes new parts would be introduced even as old ones were being used up. Collectors needed a way to identify major changes, and the approximate date they were introduced. These dates were not established in Colt records, but rather by examining the serial numbers of various guns to find the highest known number on a revolver with older features, and the lowest one on a gun with the new ones. Of course there was some overlapping in most instances.

I had no intention of yanking your chain. Still don't. But the fact remains that the oval trigger guard is what made a 3rd model what it was.

The 1st model Dragoons were made in a serial number range running from approximately 1,341 to 8,000 (1848 - 1850). The 2nd. Model ran from (give or take) 10,000 to 11,000 between 1850 - 1851. (only 2,700 made). The 3rd model was made from 1851 - 1861 within a serial number range going from 10,200 to 19,600 (some 10,500 made).

As you can see, there is a lot of overlapping here - because Colt didn't leave us with any firm records. But it is highly unlikely that Colt's were building 3rd model Dragoons starting in about 1851 using any quantity of 1st model parts (trigger guards, "V" mainsprings, cylinders, frames and cylinder bolts) as late as 1851. Such parts as there were would most likely been used up on 2nd. model revolvers.

The Old Fuff rests his case. ;) :)

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