Difference between Accurate No. 2 and 5?


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Thirties
September 12, 2003, 09:44 AM
Can you folks tell me the differences between Accurate powder no.2 and their no.5?

I'm now loading .38spl and, soon, Nagant revolver in Lee 7.62 die resized .32-20 shells.

In auto pistol, I load .32acp, .380acp, and 9x18 Makarov.

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Mal H
September 12, 2003, 09:57 AM
The obvious difference is in burn rate. No. 2 burns faster than No. 5. In more familiar powder terms, No. 2 is slightly slower than Bullseye and No. 5 is slightly faster than WW231. Both can be used in the calibers you mentioned with good success. Both meter exceptionally well.

I tend to use No. 2 more in practice rounds where you don't need to max out the velocity and No. 5 with heavier bullets where you might feel the need for speed. For the smaller cased calibers (.32 ACP, .380, etc.) it might be better to stick to No. 2 for all bullet weights, you'll get similar or even higher vel's with less powder. For the Nagant, I would stick to No. 5 or an even slower powder.

If you plan to use Accurate powders a lot, it is a good idea to purchase their reloading handbook or go to their website for loading data.

Thirties
September 12, 2003, 10:33 AM
"For the Nagant, I would stick to No. 5 or an even slower powder"

Mal, would you mind explaining why to a rather new loader (me)?

I'm trying to learn this type of "rule of thumb" info. I do have an Accurate loading book which came with my Redding press. I just don't have a handle on when a slower powder would be preferable, etc.

So far I've loaded with Bullseye, and W231 which are both fast burning powders.

Mal H
September 12, 2003, 10:58 AM
The 7.62 has a relatively high capacity case. I was thinking that No. 2 might yield pressures out of the range you would want in an old revolver if you added a bit too much powder. The slower powders would have a more gentle pressure curve and might not peak out as high or as fast (gentle, that is, as explosions go :) ). I don't reload that round so I am not knowledgeable on the actual 'best' powders or loads.

Big_R
September 12, 2003, 11:29 AM
Also, for consistent velocity you want to use up as much case capacity as you can. You can generally put more (weight and volume) of #5 than #2 in a given case and maintain safe pressure.

I too use #2 for practice rounds and #5 for the heavier stuff. I use #9 for the magnum handguns.

Ryan

Thirties
September 12, 2003, 01:12 PM
Thank you , Mal, and R, for your explanations. I will apply the "fuller is better" principle in my new loading discoveries.

redneck2
September 12, 2003, 05:08 PM
when to use fast versus slow.....

suppose you are trying to move three different balls at their highest speed...a pingpong ball, a baseball, and a bowling ball

you can smack a pingpong ball with your hand and move it quite a ways, and probably at the highest velocity (by hand)

go the the heavier ball (baseball) and you don't smack it, but you move your hand fast during a pitch (but slower than the pingpong ball)

the only way to get the best speed out of a bowling ball is swinging it relatively slow

the heavier the ball (or bullet), the slower the energy must be applied to get maximum velocity (without excessive pressure spikes and damage) . Lighter bullet needs faster powder...heavier needs slower powder

The more you fill the case (with a slower powder), the more consistent the results. Too much fast powder KB's the gun (too much pressure too quickly). Fuller is not always better...depends on the bullet, case, and desired results.

HTH

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