Cloth stuck in barrel


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groundhog34
October 9, 2008, 04:18 PM
We were cleaning a very dirty rifle and a piece of cloth came off the rod and is firmly stuck in the barrel. Any ideas how to desolve it or get it out?. Maybe some weak acid poured down the barrel, but I really don't know.

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Auburn1992
October 9, 2008, 04:18 PM
Have your tried using a borebrush to make it come out?

lions
October 9, 2008, 04:35 PM
You could try to burn it out.

N1150X
October 9, 2008, 04:41 PM
DO NOT TRY TO USE ACID TO GET THE CLOTH OUT IT WILL DESTROY YOUR BARREL!!!!!!!

why don't you just take apart a live round NO bullet NO gunpowder just a primer and a casing and "shoot it out" DO NOT USE A LIVE ROUND. BULLET CASING POWDER AND PRIMER YOU BARREL WILL EXPLODE

Birdhunter1
October 9, 2008, 05:35 PM
Have you tried soaking it in oil an pushing it out with a rod and jag?

NeoSpud
October 9, 2008, 05:39 PM
If you have an air compressor with a blowgun attachment you could just blow it out.

Picard
October 9, 2008, 05:39 PM
Yeah, do not use acid. Acids will eat away at the metal which is a definite no-no. Burning it out or pushing it out would probably work best.

Maybe put a small bit of kerosene down the barrel and light it. The cloth will slowly burn and allow you to push it out when it does.

I have never done this but I do not see how it could hurt at all, as long as you don't set anything else on fire. Hoppes #9, by the way, is kerosene based, and these temps will be lower than any temps reached by a round going off.

jackdanson
October 9, 2008, 05:40 PM
Don't try to burn it out.... it won't work... ask me how I know... soak in oil, push with brush.

Claude Clay
October 9, 2008, 05:49 PM
what caliber? length of plumbers snake, fiddle with the end using pliers and a file and a low speed drill turning in the 'out' direction of the rifleing.

rcmodel
October 9, 2008, 05:51 PM
You can't light a fire down the hole in a stopped up rifle barrel!

The fire will go out due to lack of oxygen before it ever gets started.

Knock it out with a closely fitted flat end cleaning rod jag, or brass rod.
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=193225

You didn't bother to say what kind of rifle it is, but a .22 RF will not have enough primer to shoot it out like N1150X suggested.
A center-fire might.

I also liked the air compressor suggestion from NeoSpud.
Sure worth a try!

rcmodel

Larry E
October 9, 2008, 06:45 PM
If you try to shoot it out there's a possibility that you could bulge the barrel. I'd try oiling the cloth then driving it out with a sturdy rod that fits the bore pretty closely. It will likely require a lot of tapping, so don't try to knock it out with one whack. Lots of small(ish) taps with a hammer or chunk of wood.

W.E.G.
October 9, 2008, 06:53 PM
In order to burn a stuck patch out of a rifle barrel, you apply heat to the EXTERIOR of the barrel.

When the area adjacent to the obstruction is red-hot, the obstruction will be turned to cinders.

Indeed, there is no feasible way to INSERT fire into the barrel in such a way to destroy an obstruction.

If you have some good reason for not wanting to put a torch on the barrel, you can obtain a brass rod of just under the diameter of the bore, and pound the living heck out of the rod in hopes that the obstruction will be freed. That usually works - although a torch is usually much easier to come by than a brass rod of sufficient length and correct diameter.

Jim_100
October 9, 2008, 07:17 PM
I think I would avoid making anything on the gun red hot. I don't know, just seems like a bad idea.

mpmarty
October 9, 2008, 07:23 PM
Why not take a thin piece of wire and poke it through the cloth repeatedly tearing small bits at a time until the cloth is out?

NC-Mike
October 9, 2008, 07:25 PM
Get a rod, put a point on it and heat it cherry red. Impale the obstruction with the red-hot rod and it will then fall out. :)

ants
October 9, 2008, 07:34 PM
Groundhog must be given credit for asking. Others would have ruined the rifle trying to do something stupid. And believe me, sometimes humans can come up with some pretty stupid ideas.

Take great care not to ruin the rifling in the barrel. Use a wood dowel, aluminum or brass cleaning rod, or a steel cleaning rod that has a vinyl coating to protect the bore.

In many cases, you tap the rod clean through the cloth plug. But that's OK because it helps loosen the plug up. Lubrication is always helpful.

Just go slow, tap on the rod, and be careful of the rifling in the bore.

General Geoff
October 9, 2008, 07:36 PM
wooden dowel, rubber mallet. The end :)

Golden Hound
October 9, 2008, 07:38 PM
+1. Use a mallet and tap it through very slowly.

marktx
October 9, 2008, 07:47 PM
Why not use a blank round and shoot it out? I doubt a piece of cloth would cause any higher pressure than a regular round sending a bullet out the end of the barrel.

rr2241tx
October 9, 2008, 07:49 PM
A deadblow plastic mallet and your cleaning rod will tap it out. Never, ever stick a hardwood dowel in your barrel and start hitting it or you will end up with wedged wood obstructing access to the original obstruction. It's not really necessary to go into how I came by that particular pearl of wisdom.

Claude Clay
October 9, 2008, 08:27 PM
phaser. as in-- Mr Scott, I need full power....NOW

plumbers helper (post 9)has never failed me or friends.

younganddumb
October 9, 2008, 08:41 PM
why not the airgun idea I've done some pretty amazing stuff with an air gun

CRITGIT
October 9, 2008, 08:43 PM
wooden dowel, rubber mallet. The end

Please, no more calls! We have a winner!:)

CRITGIT

W.E.G.
October 9, 2008, 11:19 PM
I think I would avoid making anything on the gun red hot. I don't know, just seems like a bad idea.

If that were the case, then every rifle with a silver-soldered muzzle brake, produced between 1994 and 2004 must be ruined.

In case you didn't know, silver solder won't melt or bond unless you get the parts red hot (~1100 degrees).

CYANIDEGENOCIDE
October 10, 2008, 08:49 AM
air compressor is a nice thought but if you can't push it out with a cleaning rod you won't move it with a compressor.
The few times i have had this happen my solution has been put some motor oil down the barrel then attack from the opposite end with a wooden dowel and a rawhide mallet.
Once when I really screwed up I had to use a packing puller its like a cork screw on steroids, check it out http://www.advancedgasket.com/pages/tooling/pullers.htm

cat9x
October 10, 2008, 08:53 AM
this thread goes to show the rampant lack of common sense.

+1 General Geoff

GRB
October 10, 2008, 09:06 AM
Why not use a blank round and shoot it out? I doubt a piece of cloth would cause any higher pressure than a regular round sending a bullet out the end of the barrel.

You are kidding - right?

jjohnson
October 10, 2008, 10:55 AM
Um... NO.:what:

If that cloth is stuck in there so tight it's that much trouble, it WILL generate more pressure than a standard load. Blanks hit the peak of the pressure curve early anyway - so to make more "bang," which is the whole point of a blank round to start with.

I didn't see the caliber mentioned. I know you can blow out a stuck cloth in some cases with just a primer - and I might be willing to try about half a grain of rifle powder in something beefy like an M98 Mauser to blow a rag out - but I certainly wouldn't try a blank. :eek: I'd feel much more comfortable using an air compressor with a rubber tip that could seal against the barrel - that's definitly worth a try.

I'd want to go with the dowel or brass rod after maybe using Kroil or some other penetrating oil to try to loosen things a bit if I couldn't manage to blow it out with compressed air. A blank would be quite a bit more compressed gas than would make for "safe sense."

jkingrph
October 10, 2008, 11:30 AM
What caliber rifle? If large enough you can get a "patch puller" for a muzzleloader If a small caliber look at how one of these is made, and take a bore cleaning brush, one where bristles are held in twisted wire, and cut off and open twist to make a double jag, sharpen ends put on rod and try to screw into stuck cloth then pull out. Just make sure twist direction is oriented so as you try to screw it in it stays screwed into cleaning rod.

Claude Clay
October 10, 2008, 11:49 AM
+1 wooden dowel & mallet ONLY if the breech end of the bbl is open and accessible. rather difficult otherwise.

rcmodel
October 10, 2008, 12:47 PM
I really truly strongly want to discourage you from ever using a wooden dowel rod to attack a problem like this!

You ain't lived until someone brings you bore obstruction into the shop with a splintered & broken dowel rod stuck/wedged in on top of it!

Use only a properly fitted brass or steel rod, or a caliber specific cleaning rod flat-tip jag.

NEVER a wood dowel rod!

rcmodel

Brian Williams
October 10, 2008, 03:11 PM
Do Not use a Wooden Dowel.

peck1234
October 10, 2008, 03:27 PM
bore snakeeeeeeeeee

627PCFan
October 10, 2008, 03:29 PM
get a brass rod from a hobby store. Do not oil the cloth it will make it swell and tighten up more. Gentle taps.

For Freedom
October 10, 2008, 04:02 PM
Replace the barrel.

ilike223s
October 11, 2008, 08:53 PM
brass rod and hammer..oil the tight rag or patch,let it soak,then push it out

been thier done that

22to45
October 12, 2008, 07:55 AM
Larry E,
I have blown a few patches out of barrells, mind you all of these were with larger rifle cartridges with fairly slow powder, I cannot imagine something with as little mass as a rag with that poor of a seal bulging a barrel. I guess if you were using very fast powder it is possible, but I would do it again without hesitation
Allen

Cannonball888
October 12, 2008, 08:21 AM
Any pressure on the wad will only increase diameter/friction.
You need to hook the cloth then pull it out by the end to unwad it. An auger made out of a modified coil spring may work.


Same concept as the cannon worm (or a drain snake auger).
http://www.cannon-mania.com/images/Trunnions/worm.jpg

Ash
October 12, 2008, 09:25 AM
I have found that the auger may or may not work. If he had already tapped on the cloth, it may be too dense to get any purchase with the tip. I have several sizes of auger used in the rayon industry to screw out rayon from gears and the like (get it hot, it will burn quickly). After getting a patch stuck in a Turkish m93 Mauser, I tried them. However, I had already tried to tap the patch out and so by the time I was trying to screw them out, the cloth was just too tightly packed.

The wood dowel will splinter and break, or at least it did so on the Mauser after I read of that advice (this was perhaps ten years ago).

The brass dowel needs to be very wide, virtually as wide as the bore, or it will bend. Again, it did bend in the Mauser.

I finally worked the patch out using rods, but it took a long time and much trial and error. It was a royal pain. Had I though about burning it, I would have out of frustration. That was a $40 rifle and so I was a bit more liberated in my actions. Had it been a very valuable rifle, who knows how aggressive I would have gotten.

Davis

jkingrph
October 12, 2008, 10:00 AM
I have found that the auger may or may not work. If he had already tapped on the cloth, it may be too dense to get any purchase with the tip. I have several sizes of auger used in the rayon industry to screw out rayon from gears and the like (get it hot, it will burn quickly). After getting a patch stuck in a Turkish m93 Mauser, I tried them. However, I had already tried to tap the patch out and so by the time I was trying to screw them out, the cloth was just too tightly packed.

The wood dowel will splinter and break, or at least it did so on the Mauser after I read of that advice (this was perhaps ten years ago).

The brass dowel needs to be very wide, virtually as wide as the bore, or it will bend. Again, it did bend in the Mauser.

I finally worked the patch out using rods, but it took a long time and much trial and error. It was a royal pain. Had I though about burning it, I would have out of frustration. That was a $40 rifle and so I was a bit more liberated in my actions. Had it been a very valuable rifle, who knows how aggressive I would have gotten.

Davis

Change angle of tips of auger so they stick forward more and are more aggressive, then use a pit of pressure when screwing into obstruction.

Another idea, cut head off of large wood screw, thread that shank put into cleaning rod, then screw into obstruction, same as muzzleloader's ball puller.

Auburn1992
October 12, 2008, 10:29 AM
Well I'd like to hear if he got it out or not.

Claude Clay
October 12, 2008, 10:33 AM
..........by now, it may be decorating the dump

or if they haven't come to take him away--he could be at the range

post #9 is in my black powder bag and as it has never failed myself and others to work in less than 5 minutes; it is all that is need. well, along with vice-grips to leverage out what the snake catches and a piece of scrap wood (1/2 x2x6") to protect the muzzle with a 1/2" hole in it to work through.

win71
October 12, 2008, 11:06 AM
Maybe somebody could explain to me how a piece of rag that tore off a bigger piece of rag got stuck in the first place.
I've had cleaning rods with patches too large get stuck but I can't understand how a piece of rag tearing off a bigger rag already in the barrel could get wedged so tight it couldn't be pushed out.

The Bushmaster
October 12, 2008, 11:09 AM
Still trying to get a handle on how one gets a "cloth" stuck in a barrel...

Claude Clay
October 12, 2008, 01:29 PM
it starts out as a 'slight' trouble---but what you do doesn't fix it and actually makes it a bit worse. repeat 2 or 3 more times and you now have a trying your patience, unspeakable problem.
until you have had the pleasure of murphy's company--it is just one of those things you have to live it to understand it.

innerpiece
October 12, 2008, 01:40 PM
is it really cloth?

try a little bleach, give it a cpl hrs and enuff of the cloth should be dissoved for it to break free..

never tried it, but it sounds a lil less life threatening than some of the previous ideas....

good luck.

ip.

Ash
October 12, 2008, 03:54 PM
If you are withdrawing the jag and the patch slips off while in the barrel you will end up with a wad of cloth in the barrel.

Ash

HRT
October 12, 2008, 07:45 PM
Had the same problem yesterday cleaning up from verifying the sights on T/C .50 Hawken. Fiddled with it for a few minutes while flapping gums with friends on the porch. then said the heck with it.... Pulled the nipple went to the barn fired up the air compressor put the air nozzle on it ......thwunp out came the patch.... Patches can and do slip off of jags and with a closed breech they can get to be a problem...compressed air or hydraulic pressure can be a great friend...BTW Sights were fine 5 for 5 in a tomato juice can at 50 yds iron sights and sitting. Certainly MOD (Minute of Deer) for the 30 to 40 yd brush shots I generally get.

I generally loose a patch when I'm being too stingy and cut or tear it too small

groundhog34
October 12, 2008, 09:00 PM
Got it out by pouring Kroil into the cleaning cloth from both ends letting it set for an hour then hitting a cleaning rod with a rubber mallet.
thanks to all

230RN
October 12, 2008, 11:45 PM
See Hatcher's Notebook on barrel obstructions.

For the service rifle, they dumped half the powder out of a regular case, stuck it in the chamber with no bullet, and fired stuck patches out.

It was not recommended as general practice in the field because there were a lot of variables, but it worked pretty good for stuck cleaning patches in the testing lab.

There were instances where they tried to duplicate absolute worst case scenarios (many patches, bullets stuck in bore, etc) where the rifle just sat there after the firing pin fell with a click, no bang, no nuthin', and without having blown out the obstruction.

As Hatcher puts it, they had plenty of fun opening the bolt in those instances, with the pressure left in the bore, by gingerly tapping the bolt handle upward with a broom handle. He noted with his characteristic understatement, that the bolts suddenly opened with a loud pop, and also that the cases were ejected "smartly" as the bolt flew back.

IIRC, one case stuck in the wall.

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