very basic questions from a rifle newbie


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mangurian
October 10, 2008, 06:18 AM
basic questions on use of Springfield 187

I have had this gun in the original package for over 30 years.
I am now retired and would like to do some recreational shooting (tin cans for now). Before I ask a neighbor for help, I have some basic "how not to look like a complete idiot" questions. The instructions say (basically) to remove the loader tube and put the shells in facing forward.

In where ?
I removed the long tube under the barrel. There is a red plastic string plugged into the trigger end of the removed tube and just flopping loose. How do I load the 22's? Do I remove the plastic string and put the shells into the tube??
How many can I put in? (Are you laughing yet ?).

How is the first shell brought up into the chamber (is it called a chamber)?

Is there a safety (is it the little metal slide on top near the stock?)

Every how often should I clean the gun?

All/any help appreciated.

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Bearhands
October 10, 2008, 06:43 AM
Since it's in the original package, isn't there a manual in that package somewhere?

mangurian
October 10, 2008, 07:29 AM
...remove the tube, load the cartridges and replace the tube.

doesn't help a no-nothing like me. :banghead:

Jeff F
October 10, 2008, 07:40 AM
I'm not sure what a Springfield 187 is but it sounds like a a tube fed .22. Pull the inner tube out of the outer tube and drop the bullets pointy end up down the outer tube then push the inner tube back in and lock in place. I have no idea how many rounds it will hold. You could try to goggle Springfield 187

USSR
October 10, 2008, 08:12 AM
How do I load the 22's? Do I remove the plastic string and put the shells into the tube??
How many can I put in? (Are you laughing yet ?).

How is the first shell brought up into the chamber (is it called a chamber)?

Is there a safety (is it the little metal slide on top near the stock?)

Every how often should I clean the gun?

mangurian,

I have a similar rifle (Model 87A), and they hold atleast 15 (maybe 18) .22 long rifle cartridges. The cartridges are inserted into the tube that lies under the barrel (not the tube that you removed), and are inserted so that the bullet end of the cartridge faces towards the muzzle (front end) of the barrel. Make sure the bolt is closed when you do this. After you have inserted the cartridges, reinsert the tuble that you initially removed from under the barrel. Yes, the little metal slide on top on the left side of the stock is the safety. Now, to bring the first shell up into the chamber, pull the bolt handle on the right side of the receiver all the way towards you, and then release it. This will load the first shell in the chamber. As for cleaning, I usually only clean mine before putting it away for the winter. Hope that helps.

Don

mangurian
October 10, 2008, 09:03 AM
That is just the kind of info I needed.

One more thing....do I just go to Walmart (or wherever) and ask for "long rifle" cartridges or are there different types available?

many thanks,

Mr_Pale_Horse
October 10, 2008, 09:29 AM
.22 Long Rifle

There are variations (jacketed, clad, washed, hollow point, . . .) but the price point box of shells (2nd least expensive :p) is sufficient for informal target shooting.

Vaarok
October 10, 2008, 09:34 AM
One thing you might have issue with is, given that to my memory the 187 is an auto-loader, is some ammo might work better, and other types not work well at all in your rifle depending on brand. Some autoloading .22 rifles are picky and won't completely eject an empty casing from certain brands.

If your rifle doesn't work with one type, just try another.

22-rimfire
October 10, 2008, 09:51 AM
Place to start is buying the Federal Bulk Pack (box is full of loose ammunition-550 count I believe) at Walmat. I prefer the Federal 510's (22 long rifle solid point $1.47/box) which are packed in 50 round boxes of 50. They are labeled Champions in a blue box. Just look you will probably see them. It will all come back to you if you shot before.

Make sure when you chamber a round that you point the muzzle toward the ground. On occasion, I have had one go off. Not common, but it happens.

Review the basic rules of firearm safety. But the most important thing is to not point your firearm at something you do not intend to shoot. Keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to fire.

I assume you are familiar with the safety release. It should be a little lever on the right side of the receiver that you move. There is probably a red painted dot when it is in the fire position versus safe position.

When you first start shooting the rifle. After you get comfortable with loading and basic shooting, try to shoot the rifle in the safe position to make sure the safety feature works and of course keep the gun pointed toward the ground when you do it.

Unload the gun when you are done. Check inside the chamber by pulling open the bolt release visually after you think the rifle is unloaded.

The rifle will not chamber rounds when the tubular magazine is not pressed back into the magazine. There is a spring on it so it gets harder to push in with more rounds.

I would suggest that you give the rifle a good cleaning and inspection.

mangurian
October 10, 2008, 09:56 AM
That is just the kind of info I needed.

http://www.pbase.com/image/104336915.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/nupbase/image/104336920.jpg

do I just go to Walmart (or wherever) and ask for "long rifle" cartridges or are there different types available?

many thanks,

woof
October 10, 2008, 10:05 AM
It may help to remember that the tube you pull out is a spring to keep pressure on the row of cartridges. That pressure keeps them feeding into the chamber. I also recommend Federal Champion .22 LR in the blue box of 50 at walmart. I would also add that it would be a good idea to run a cleaning rod with a patch and some Hoppes or other cleaner through the bore before shooting since there may be old oil buildup in there. A .22 boresnake that you can get at walmart makes it really easy. After that the bore on a .22 doesn't need cleaning often, maybe once a year. As for your other questions and the pics it is hard to say without seeing it. You might be better off to take it to a gun shop to buy some ammo and just tell them you are unfamiliar with this rifle and ask them the questions. They will show you and if there is an issue they will find it. The rifle may just be gummed up after the years and for maybe $20 you can get it professionally cleaned and checked out which would be well worth it.

rangerruck
October 10, 2008, 11:30 AM
dont start with bulk pacs, get several boxes of individual 50 round boxes, to see which works best, and then of the ones that work best, find the 1 or 2 boxes which are most accurate. try bulk pacs later, after you know which individual boxes work best. Not sure, but on your outer tube, on the bottom side, you may have a cut out of the shape of a 22lr cartridge; this way, you only have to pull out your inner tube, just far enough to clear the space of this cartridge cutout, to load the outter tube. once you fill the outter tube with cartridges, up to this cuttout spot, you know the tube is full, then push back in your inner tube.
American Eagle, which is a red box of ammo, which features the picture of an eagle's face on the front; it is made by federal, and is the best , most accurate, and most reliable , of the cheapy ammo, usually. try that for sure.
unless your rifle says, fires s, l, lr, only use long rifle, or lr. s, and l, stand for short, and long, which will not have enough power for yours, if yours says use long rifle only.

rangerruck
October 10, 2008, 11:33 AM
the safetly will not move more than a half inch, and yes the charging handle should move rearward. try to move it, with the safe in the forward, and rearward position. also try to move it, but pull in, or outward, on the charging handle itself , first. Usually , you can lock it open, the bolt that is, by pulling it rearward all the way, then pushing in on the handle.

rangerruck
October 10, 2008, 11:34 AM
looks like that scope is a vintage savage/springfield scope, meant for that rifle. Don't lose it or damage it, worth some bucks by itself, and helps the overall value of that rifle.

rangerruck
October 10, 2008, 11:43 AM
first off, all new rifles should be cleaned, FIRST, as they are usually loaded with all kinds of steel shavings, and other crap, from the mfgr process. clean, and lightly lube,, then use some dry patches, then go to the range, blast away, keeping a light lube on the action/boltassy.,/ inside of receiver, where bolt action assy., moves back and forth. when done from the range, clean everyting again, lightly lube everything again, including the bbl bore, for storage. after that, you may not clean and lube the bore again, for a long , looooonnnnggg time, though you may clean and lube around the bolt assy., and inside the reciever, everytime you shoot it, as most rimfires shoot very accurately with a dirty bore. if you notice your accuracy starting to fall off, then another cleaning is due. But this could be after 1000's of rounds.

mangurian
October 10, 2008, 01:48 PM
Went to a gun dealer. He removed the stock and said the bolt mechanism was frozen tight. He said he had never seen that and maybe the gun had shipped with some material (cosmolene) that hardened over its 35+ years of storage. He was afraid he would break something, so I took it home and WD-40'd it. was gradually able to move the mechanism more and more. When I could move it all the way (so that I could dry fire) I put a couple of drops of oil on the mechanism. I think it is ok now. Having no experience, I am not really sure how hard I should have to pull back on the bolt(?) mechanism. An ounce ? a pound ?

Any more info appreciated.

you folks sure are helpful !

USSR
October 10, 2008, 02:06 PM
mangurian,

The safety doesn't have alot of play in it, so with the rifle unloaded, test it to make sure it is working properly. As for the bolt knob, with mine (an older model), the bolt knob can be pushed in or pulled out away from the receiver. When it is pushed in, it is locked in place and cannot be pulled back. When it is pulled out away from the receiver, you can work the bolt to pull it back to chamber a cartridge.

Don

woof
October 10, 2008, 03:17 PM
The more I think about it, I think you should invest in a professional cleaning. Call around and tell them the story and get prices. Take it to whoever sounds best. I'm sure there are a lot of people who would do it for $20. In fact, you could start a new thread asking for someone in your area. You might find someone here on THR close by to help.

sqlbullet
October 10, 2008, 03:21 PM
I am not familiar with this particular firearm. However, it is generally inadvisable to dry fire a rim-fire caliber weapon, like a 22 long rifle. This is because the firing pin will impact on the edge of the chamber. Both these components are steel, at least one of them hardened. Deformation of the firing pin or chamber rim can occur over time.

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