Most accurate/Cheapest caliber for Remington 700


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Armueller2001
October 13, 2008, 01:03 AM
I'm considering buying a Remington 700 or similar sniper rifle (AR15 is great, just not sub-MOA) and have 2 questions about calibers for long range purposes -

1) What is the most accurate caliber out to about 600 yards?

2) What is the cheapest caliber to buy?

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Ridgerunner665
October 13, 2008, 01:07 AM
308...Remington SPS Tactical...less than $600 and 99% of them will shoot well below .5 MOA out of the box with quality reloads.

rfurtkamp
October 13, 2008, 01:15 AM
Sub-MOA and 'cheapest caliber to buy' really don't belong in the same post.

ugaarguy
October 13, 2008, 01:27 AM
1) What is the most accurate caliber out to about 600 yards?

2) What is the cheapest caliber to buy?
The two are pulling at opposite ends of the equation. Caliber is less important than grade of ammunition. Match grade ammo is not cheap.

If you want to get into a heavy barrel Remington 700 at a low price the SPS Tactical is a great buy. Take your pic of the two calibers offered, .223 or .308, and add good ammo. You can probably get match grade .223 for a little less than match grade .308. For your stated range of 600 yards .223 is fine.
AR15 is great, just not sub-MOA
You need to do a little more research on that.

Kind of Blued
October 13, 2008, 01:41 AM
If you meant "Cheapest Sub-MOA capable caliber in a Remington 700", .308 would probably be a good bet, as noted in by Ridgerunner 665. Although, if you want really good results in regard to accuracy, most will recommend hand-loading. At this point, any caliber that the 700 is chambered for could be loaded relatively cheaply and probably print sub-MOA groups.

Armueller2001
October 13, 2008, 01:41 AM
Sorry, I should have specified... by "Cheapest caliber" I meant per round.

I know the two questions are opposites, I'm not looking for a single caliber to answer both.

For your stated range of 600 yards .223 is fine.

Doesn't the .223 round drop something like 28 inches at 600 yds? I'm wondering if there is a round with a flatter trajectory. I'd like it to be at least .30" to be suitable for deer hunting. A few calibers that come to mind are

30-06
.308
.300 Win Mag

I'm not familiar with the ballistics of any of these calibers...

If you meant "Cheapest Sub-MOA capable caliber in a Remington 700", .308 would probably be a good bet

Thanks for the suggestion. I did some reading on other sites and it seems like .308 is a popular one.

General Geoff
October 13, 2008, 01:45 AM
Cheapest would be .223.


Most accurate, well... probably one of those weird 6mm super duper cartridges that zak smith uses.

Tarvis
October 13, 2008, 01:51 AM
Kind of a strange question, as the cartridge on it's own does not dictate accuracy. Certainly some cartridges have better accuracy potential over others, but accuracy is decided more by the shooter than the gear; more by the rifle-ammo combination than what the cartridge is.

Cost is related to availability and cost of goods sold; larger case with a heavy bullet that isn't widely produced will be more expensive than a smaller lighter bullet with less powder that everyone shoots or is available as surplus.

ugaarguy
October 13, 2008, 01:53 AM
Doesn't the .223 round drop something like 28 inches at 600 yds? I'm wondering if there is a round with a flatter trajectory. I'd like it to be at least .30" to be suitable for deer hunting.
In that case skip a .223 and get a .308, because .308 is going to be the next least expensive and equally available caliber for factory match ammo. I'd buy a cheap used .30-30 lever gun for deer hunting, rather than lug around a heavy bbl. target bolt gun, with a heavy scope.

skinewmexico
October 13, 2008, 01:54 AM
Actually, a 223 will drop more like 79" at 600, but it's only 12 MOA. Actually not that different from a 308, the bullet make a big difference. That's why you have an elevation knob, it's made to crank. My Savage with a 1-7 twist is shooting Black Hills 77g SMKs very well @ 600. Great on deer too.

Armueller2001
October 13, 2008, 02:02 AM
My Savage with a 1-7 twist is shooting Black Hills 77g SMKs very well @ 600. Great on deer too.

I was under the impression that a small caliber like .223 wasn't suitable for deer.. is that wrong?

Sunray
October 13, 2008, 02:42 AM
"...a Remington 700 or similar sniper rifle..." A scoped Rem 700, in any calibre, is not a sniper's rifle unless it has been heavily modified. A standard scoped Rem 700 is a hunting rifle. Period.
"...just not sub-MOA..." Few semi-autos are. That'd be less than 1 inch groups at 100 yards. An AR can be turned into a very fine target rifle though. Not inexpensively, but it can be done. Heavily modified AR's are the standard National Match rifles these days.
"....223 wasn't suitable for deer..is that wrong?..." Depends on the bullet. Most factory .223 ammo is loaded with varmint bullets. Varmints bullets are designed to expand rapidly without much penetration. They're not suitable for deer sized game. Deer sized game requires bullets that penetrate then start expanding.
The size of your local deer matters too. Up here, a deer can run nearly 300 pounds live weight. That'd be a huge deer though, but a 200 pound plus deer isn't entirely unusual. Deer are smaller elsewhere.
1) There is no one calibre. However, what you intend doing with the rifle and the ammo matters. No calibre is suitable for 600 yard hunting shots if you can't hit a 9" pie plate at that distance every time. A .308 target rifle with 168 grain match grade bullets will do nicely out to 600, but you cannot just pick one up and expect to hit the bull at 600.
2) .22 Long Rifle. The least expensive centre fire ammo is likely the .223.

lefteyedom
October 13, 2008, 09:00 AM
Sniper rifle? or F class?
Look are you going to punch paper and steel plates or shoot Bipedal varmits??

If the first, get a SPS Tactical in 308 and buy a Lee reloading kit.

If the later then join US armed forces.

skinewmexico
October 13, 2008, 11:29 AM
I was under the impression that a small caliber like .223 wasn't suitable for deer.. is that wrong?


Yes. If you can shoot. My kids have done it a bunch, and they are all DRT.

moooose102
October 13, 2008, 11:40 AM
are you planing to just target shoot, or hunt with it as well? if you are going to hunt with it as well, the recomendation will depend on what you are going to hunt. a 223 has no buisness hunting an elk, at any range. (i know, here come the flames) but it is not necessary to shoot a 308 if all you are going to kill are prarie dog paper targets.

USSR
October 13, 2008, 11:47 AM
Kind of a strange question, as the cartridge on it's own does not dictate accuracy.

+1. Accuracy is more a function of the quality of an individual rifle and a particular ammo than any particular caliber/cartridge.

Don

Tarvis
October 13, 2008, 04:13 PM
Accuracy is more a function of the quality of an individual rifle and a particular ammo than any particular caliber/cartridge.
That's what I was trying to say, couldn't spit the words out.

I'm not sure what your intention is with this rifle, but my advice is to get a .223 with a decent scope to start with and eventually get another rifle in 308. There is no rifle or cartridge that answers every question, but a .223 bolt gun with moderate ($400-$600) optics will be a great start.

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