Glock and Concealed Carry: Round in chamber or no?


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jpruitt
October 15, 2008, 08:23 AM
I have never considered carrying a semi-auto without a round in the chamber, but with my new Glock, the trigger is so much lighter than the DAOs I've carried in the past. The guy at the store that sold it to me carries the same gun, and he says he carries without a round chambered and racks it as he draws.

Do most other Glock owners/carriers carry with one in the chamber? I really don't see the problem if you've conditioned yourself to follow the four rules. Of course, in a perfect world where everyone followed those rules 100% all the time there would never be any AD/NDs. Is this something I should worry about?

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theken206
October 15, 2008, 08:25 AM
are you an israeli commando?? no?? then carry with one in the pipe IMHO.

perpster
October 15, 2008, 09:01 AM
What if somebody has grabbed you and you can only get one hand free?

If you carry in a holster that covers the trigger there's not much to worry about as long as you keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot.

BTW, you can get a heavier trigger pull for your Glock if it's that much of an issue. Look into the NY-1 and NY-2 triggers. But have it done professionally as there are certain combinations of parts that are a no-no.

ashtxsniper
October 15, 2008, 09:08 AM
I always carry with 1 in the pipe. Carrying a Glock 22 right now 15 in the mag + 1 in the pipe.

dsw3131
October 15, 2008, 09:13 AM
Always carry a round chambered. You never know whether you'll have time to chamber one. A good holster that covers the trigger will protect it fine.

If he's that edgy about the Glock he shouldn't be carrying one.

The Lone Haranguer
October 15, 2008, 09:17 AM
I've posted something like this (http://www.thehighroad.org/showpost.php?p=5007201&postcount=3) dozens of times.

possum
October 15, 2008, 11:44 AM
imho, the only way to carry is with one in the chamber. if you don't feel safe with a loaded gun then you shouldn't be carrying.

Ben86
October 15, 2008, 11:48 AM
It is fine to carry one in the chamber as long as its in a holster and you keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot.

You will be lucky to see attempts on your life ahead of time, so believing you will have time to chamber a round no matter what is foolish.

If you are still not comfortable with this you would be better served carrying a gun with a manual safety.

skwab
October 15, 2008, 11:51 AM
The glock has many safety features built in to keep it from firing, however, at the end of the day something gets in the trigger guard it can go bang. A good, secure holster is a must, training with that holster drawing and re-holstering is a must.

When something happens, it usually happens instantly, so the thought that you'll have the time or the physical ability to rack the slide could be inacurate, so if it turns out that you just aren't comfortable carrying the glock, have a gunsmith add an external safety or go get a different model with an external safety.

4thPointOfContact
October 15, 2008, 12:11 PM
Lots of people will tell you that they have always had time to rack the slide when drawing or that they had two good hands to do it with.

The people who Didn't have time to rack the slide, or Didn't have two good hands, or Didn't have two hands free because one was fending off a Goblin or had been disabled won't say anything; they're too busy being dead because they couldn't shoot back.


If you can guarantee that you will always have time, that you will always have two good, uninjured hands, that you will always have two hands available...then go ahead and carry with an empty chamber.

possum
October 15, 2008, 12:13 PM
The guy at the store that sold it to me carries the same gun, and he says he carries without a round chambered and racks it as he draws.
i would like to see this guy or anybody else for that matter that dosen't carry one in the chamber, do a tueller(sp?)aka the 21ft drill. that would be interesting.

M1911
October 15, 2008, 12:22 PM
I usually don't carry a Glock, but I have at times. If I do carry my Glock, I carry it with the chamber full. If you think the trigger is too light for your taste, you can easily fix that with a spring change -- no gunsmith required.

If you need a gun, you need it real bad, and you need it right now. As others have pointed out, your support hand might be otherwise occupied: fending off the perp, opening a door, pushing your spouse to safety, holding your child, etc.

There are techniques for cycling the slide with one hand. If you are willing to spend the amount of time it takes to become accomplished at cycling the slide with one hand, you could spend far less time to just become accomplished at safely drawing and holstering with your finger off the trigger.

polizei36
October 15, 2008, 12:43 PM
8 years and still have one in the chamber daily.

Ever think that if your shot and incapacitated that your significant other may have to pick it up your firearm to defend their lives (assuming they were not carrying one of their own). They my not know how to, or that they have to charge it before firing it? Just thinking outside the box.

OOOXOOO
October 15, 2008, 02:13 PM
An empty chamber is an unloaded gun. I carry a Glock everyday with a round chambered.

mljdeckard
October 15, 2008, 02:15 PM
I recently had this discussion with an army major, who has been deployed to Iraq twice. He was convinced that there is never a reason to have a round chambered, as it is unsafe. I got him to admit that it's not the practice that's unsafe, it's the average undertrained soldier.

I then asked him, "Under what circumstances will you need to actually use that sidearm?" He thought about it, and said, if his (very comfortable) position (in the rear) was overrun, he would be forced to defend it. I asked him, "If that happens, when the bad guys are THAT CLOSE, and you arein THAT MUCH TROUBLE, do you know for sure you will have both hands free to draw and rack that pistol?" He wasn't sure what I meant. "Do you know that you won't be pushing a bad guy away with your left arm while you draw with your right, or that one of your hands or arms won't be wounded? Will you be applying direct pressure with your left hand while you draw with your right, and if you do, HOW WILL YOU CHARGE THAT WEAPON? Have you ever trained in racking that slide one-handed, or considered if such a thing is possible with your setup?" He said no. "Then it sounds to me like you better keep a round in that chamber."

Your sidearm is something you use when everything in the entire world around you is failing. You have no rifle. There are no police. You have failed to avoid trouble. The situation is bad enough that you need to shoot someone. You must assume that you are doing it not just with one hand, but very possibly with your WEAK hand.

reb27
October 15, 2008, 02:33 PM
Being in a wheelchair and having a CCW, and carrying a GLOCK 22 every day, I'd think it's a must that a carry gun have a round in the chamber. What good is it without one in there?

lanternlad1
October 15, 2008, 04:27 PM
If it bothers you so much, carry chambered, and use a Saf-T-Blok.

http://www.ajaxgrips.com/ajax/saftblok

highorder
October 15, 2008, 04:50 PM
"There is nothing more worthless than an unloaded gun"

-Anthony "Tony" Soprano

Legionnaire
October 15, 2008, 06:00 PM
Round chambered, good holster, and proper trigger discipline.

Treo
October 15, 2008, 06:13 PM
These "round in the chamber?" threads are getting as bad as the Wal-Mart threads

M1911
October 15, 2008, 06:14 PM
If it bothers you so much, carry chambered, and use a Saf-T-Blok.Which requires you to manipulate something right next to the trigger in order to make the gun ready to fire, even if you don't want to fire right at that moment. Seems to me to be a solution that's worse than the problem. YMMV.

Not for me, thanks.

distra
October 15, 2008, 06:26 PM
An unloaded gun on your hip is an expensive rock! Load it, holster it and keep your finger off the trigger, it really is that simple. If you are that afraid of an ND with a Glock, get a pistol with a manual safety. Keep your loose clothes away from the holster while reholstering.

Which requires you to manipulate something right next to the trigger in order to make the gun ready to fire, even if you don't want to fire right at that moment. Seems to me to be a solution that's worse than the problem. YMMV.


Well put, like the 40S&W, an answer to a non existant problem.

RyanM
October 15, 2008, 06:40 PM
Well put, like the 40S&W, an answer to a non existant problem.

So the fact that most people hate 10mm recoil (most people are too wimpy to even take .40 S&W recoil!) wasn't actually a problem?

Anyway,

Do most other Glock owners/carriers carry with one in the chamber?

Yep. Though one time I decided to Mexican carry in Wal-Mart, and that time the chamber was empty. :p

Geno
October 15, 2008, 06:44 PM
Always carry a round in the chamber.

distra
October 15, 2008, 06:47 PM
So the fact that most people hate 10mm recoil (most people are too wimpy to even take .40 S&W recoil!) wasn't actually a problem?


Not when the .45 has been around for say...90+ years! :neener:

mljdeckard
October 16, 2008, 12:32 AM
Recoil wasn't the problem the .40 solved. The problem it solved was how to put a more powerful cartridge into existing 9mm frames. THAT'S why it pushed the 10mm aside.

357sigRog
October 16, 2008, 02:07 AM
1 second is an eternity. You might not have the 1 second to do it. Keep one in the chamber and be ready.

Girodin
October 16, 2008, 03:43 AM
When I did some defensive pistol training that had us run through various scenerios some of which required drawing and "firing" and others did not the one thing that I really came away with is how fast a situation that requires you to use your weapon could unfold. If you are needing to draw a pistol there is a good chance you need to use it immediately.

It made me realize that not only would you not have time to be racking slides (something I have never thought would be a good option) but you need your weapon to be very accesable.

What if someone grabs one arm or the like. Carrying empty chamber is not a good idea in my opinion. Get a quality holster that covers the trigger gurard and you should be fine.

Captain Bligh
October 16, 2008, 07:27 AM
If you're going to carry a gun without a chambered round, you might as well be carrying a brick.

If you're uncomfortable, it's better that you should use a safety-block. If you are called upon to use a carry weapon quickly, you can flick that out single-handed faster than you can rack a round.

easyg
October 16, 2008, 09:14 AM
One in the chamber is fine IF, and only IF, you have a good holster for your Glock.

Kleanbore
October 16, 2008, 09:31 AM
Originally posted by mljdeckard: I recently had this discussion with an army major, who has been deployed to Iraq twice. He was convinced that there is never a reason to have a round chambered, as it is unsafe.

Different situation, different objective. He is going into combat and can do so with a drawn weapon. You are permitted to produce your weapon, presumably from concealment, only as a last resort when you are in imminent danger of death or grave bodily harm.

As previously pointed out, that generally means that you have an assailant 21 feet or less away and that he's coming at you. Means you have to draw, and fire if necessary, in a couple of seconds.

Round in the chamber.

Crow1108
October 16, 2008, 10:24 AM
I plan on carrying my Glock with a round in the chamber. I carry my 1911 Condition 1, and carried my Sig with a round in the chamber with the hammer down. I figure, why should my Glock be any different? If I get into a bad situation, I'll have enough to worry about without having to worry about racking the slide.

mljdeckard
October 16, 2008, 11:35 AM
Nope, same situation, same objective. Carrying a sidearm for an unspecified armed confrontation he will likely never see. But if he ever did see it, he could not guarantee that he would have both hands free.

Between me and the SEAL who was also in our class, we convinced him, but of course there will probably be command rules that prohibit a round in the chamber.

PhillyGlocker
October 16, 2008, 10:51 PM
The guy at the store that sold it to me carries the same gun, and he says he carries without a round chambered and racks it as he draws.
The guy at the store is a moron, and definitely someone you don't want to take training lessons with. :scrutiny:

Baneblade
October 16, 2008, 11:51 PM
We had an officer who just retired that refused to carry his duty weapon with a round in the chamber. I think it is a distinct disadvantage, but not essential.

He trained to chamber the gun as he drew it from the holster, and he also trained to do so with one hand if needed (wounded officer drills). It can easily be done by hooking the rear sight on a holster, belt, pants, etc and pushing downward.

Don't get me wrong. I would never carry my duty gun without a round in the chamber, but if someone wants to, they just need to understand the disadvantage and train to overcome it.

I disagree that a gun with an empty chamber and full magazine is useless, but do agree that in certain situations you will not have the opportunity to chamber the gun.

My brother has no formal firearms training (I'm an instructor and have trained him, but he has never attended a formal class) and keeps his Sig 220 unchambered. It is a calculated risk for him which he understands. He trains appropriately for it and does fine.

Retro
October 17, 2008, 06:53 PM
yeah, if you are asking that question, the right gun for you is a HK P7...

I also had the same concern with 1 in the chamber in my G26, and recently, I bought a plastic trigger lock piece that inserts behind the trigger, and it can be pushed out quickly when one needs to shoot.

I also carry Russian makarov with one in the chamber, hammer down. In my mind, double action with hammer down is always safer than a single-action with 1/3 way-cocked firing pin.

herbie1
October 17, 2008, 08:16 PM
One of the things I like about the Glock is all the trigger options.

I can replace or use various combinations of springs and connectors to adjust the trigger pull.

I can also use products such as sider-lock or saf-t-block.

So far I have not used any of these options, but after I get used to my recently purchased g26 I will explore some of these options.

http://siderlock.com/
http://www.clipdraw.com/store/index.php?rn=396&action=show_detail

camslam
October 17, 2008, 10:02 PM
imho, the only way to carry is with one in the chamber. if you don't feel safe with a loaded gun then you shouldn't be carrying

Yep.

It took me about a week of carrying to be comfortable mentally and otherwise with carrying my loaded Glock 30, haven't looked back since then.

Blue .45
October 17, 2008, 10:42 PM
You could switch to a gun which uses a manual safety, if you're not comfortable carrying a loaded GLOCK. It is easier to knock a safety off using one hand, than it is to chamber a round with one hand, IMO.

rkhal
October 18, 2008, 02:29 AM
Do most other Glock owners/carriers carry with one in the chamber?
Only when I carry it. If I don't load it there isn't much point in carrying it.

Stevie-Ray
October 19, 2008, 02:12 AM
Yes, of course!

denfoote
October 19, 2008, 02:24 AM
This is another attempt to bring life to a deceased equine through the judicious use of blunt force trauma!!!

WARDER
October 19, 2008, 04:25 AM
in my oppinion for what its worth i wouldent carry a Glock with one in the spout or one out of the spout ,I WOULDEN'T CARRY A GLOCK

PhillyGlocker
October 19, 2008, 11:54 PM
I really hate seeing this type of thread. If you know anything about firearms, carrying a round in the chamber of a Glock for SD is the only way it should be carried. Glock is the one of, if not, thee top dog in firearms right now. Why carry an unloaded Glock around? Go ahead and risk flicking off the safety on a 1911 in a SD situation if you want. I'll take the Glock everytime. No fancy manual safeties needed. Go to the carry issues on www.Glocktalk.com. There's a thread about this very subject. Carry a Glock with one in the chamber? Ha! You better believe it. Draw and fire is all I have to do. Ask the jeweler who got shot because he forgot to flick his safety off of his gun. Some people learn the hard way.

PhillyGlocker
October 20, 2008, 12:01 AM
One in the chamber is fine IF, and only IF, you have a good holster for your Glock.
I guess this goes for revolvers too huh? This board is full of tactical geniuses.

Carry a round in your Glock bro, for it is one of the most safe and effective weapons ever made.

MAKster
October 20, 2008, 12:44 PM
Carrying a Glock in a holster that covers the trigger is vital because the trigger pull is only 5.5 pounds. You can pocket carry a revolver or put it in a purse because the trigger pull is 12 pounds.

easyg
October 20, 2008, 03:42 PM
I guess this goes for revolvers too huh? This board is full of tactical geniuses.

Carrying a Glock in a holster that covers the trigger is vital because the trigger pull is only 5.5 pounds. You can pocket carry a revolver or put it in a purse because the trigger pull is 12 pounds.
Exactly!

Yes, because the Glock has such a light and short trigger-pull, only an idiot would carry a Glock concealed without a good holster that covers the trigger.

Carrying a unholstered Glock in your pocket is like carrying a COCKED revolver in your pocket.....very stupid and very dangerous.

havoc7usmc
October 21, 2008, 09:06 AM
WOW!!! To many real gun fighters on this post.

Bill_G
October 21, 2008, 11:40 AM
with a NY 1 trigger it should be plenty safe.

FMJMIKE
October 21, 2008, 08:41 PM
I will carry my Glock tucked in my pants without holster. So...no bullet in the chamber. Oh......I live in a pretty safe area. Vicious dogs and rabid animals are my biggest problems.

earlthegoat2
October 21, 2008, 09:19 PM
Quote by havoc7usmc: WOW!!! To many real gun fighters on this post.

Ill say I sure wish some would chime in and say he should be carrying a 1911, and God forbid, cocked and locked.

Its a Glock, the most prolific handgun in Law Enforcement today. These things have a service record that speaks for itself and I highly doubt any of those guys carried one without one ready in the hole.

havoc7usmc
October 21, 2008, 10:00 PM
The only time I don't have one in the tube is when I fly. But that's my paranoia. It's not that I doubt my capabilities but it's some of the "less then law abiding people", that may have a knack of seeing the print of a firearm. Like I said, that's my paranoia, any other time it's loaded. I carried the 1911 for 10 years before we went to the M9. So in short. I'm comfortable running, jumping and crawling (except in airports) when it comes to "locked & cocked".
But I am amazed at how many people, including LEO's, blame the glock for negligent discharges You will not believe how many unreported negligent discharges Customs Officers had when they went to the glock...of course they blamed the gun.

Ben86
October 21, 2008, 11:31 PM
The only time I don't have my any of my Glocks chambered is when they are in the house. Part of that is because I frequenty practice/fondle with them and having to unload then reload the chamber would be really annoying. However if it is on me and I alone am in complete control of it, it will be chambered.

havoc7usmc
October 22, 2008, 10:45 PM
Never stand in the same room when a CBP officer clears his/her firearm. And please don"t blame the glock or H&K

Thanks.

cliffy
October 22, 2008, 11:13 PM
No, not I. Like the safety of an empty-chamber, and like that it takes only a frightening slide-slam to make an assailant crap-his-pants. Psychological effect is golden. Let them hear the hammer close upon a live round. I kill ONLY when no other channel exists within a split-second of reality. Shooting to wound is a military-dilemma, that must disappear swiftly. Considering that an assailant must die is ALWAYS a split-second decision. I ALWAYS preserve life for court decisions when PRACTICAL. cliffy

earlthegoat2
October 23, 2008, 12:46 AM
im not going to say i have killed as many people as anyone else here (sarcasm intended) but the split second of reality can be a split second too late.

What military dilemma? I always thought we were being trained to kill because killing the enemy is the surest way that they are not going to kill us.

krs
October 23, 2008, 01:42 PM
Military dilemma? Kill or be killed. What dilemma?

If you are afraid of a ready to go Glock then buy one of the SA/DA pistols with a decocker and learn to trust the decocker.

I have two like that around the house - an old Smith M469 chambered using decock and needing it's long DA pull to fire, and a Sig 232 in the same state, but I carry my G19 chambered. It may have a 5 lb letoff but something would have to pull through the first stage to get to that 5 lb breakpoint.

Landor
October 23, 2008, 03:48 PM
If you are afraid of carrying a Glock with one in the chamber then you should not carry a Glock. You will get use to it as time goes on.

I good holster in a must. Anybody that carries a Glock chambered without a holster is crazy in my book. Sorry but that is an accident waiting to happen. Of course this is all my personal opinion and others may see it differently.

Kleanbore
October 24, 2008, 10:16 AM
From cliffy: No, not I. Like the safety of an empty-chamber, and like that it takes only a frightening slide-slam to make an assailant crap-his-pants. Psychological effect is golden.

Can you draw from concealment and cycle the slide in the time it takes a man to run to within striking distance of you from 21 feet? I suggest that you try it and practice.

If not, I think you're probably better off trying to out-run your assailant.

I prefer to dispense with the added step.

mljdeckard
October 24, 2008, 02:25 PM
Tell the DA you carry for 'psychological effect', and see how that gets you. (All the way to prison, probably.) If you had time to do anything other than draw and shoot, indeed, you PLANNED to have time to be able to do something other than draw and shoot, it opens the possibility that A: you might have had time to something besides shoot, and B:You therefore were carrying to scare people rather than use your firearm only for critical self-defense. Think like a lawyer, and when you realize you're in over your head, consult one. (WHICH YOU SHOULD DO ANYWAY IF YOU CARRY. If you can't afford a retainer, at least pre-arrange with a good field-experienced lawyer and make sure you have insurance that will come close to covering his fee.)

Remember, your sidearm is something you use when everything else has gone wrong. You can't assume you will get in the first shot. OR THE FIRST HIT. Or that you will be operating at full capacity, physically or mentally. You can't assume that your weak hand won't be on a steering wheel, forcing back an attacker while you draw, wounded, OR STOPPING BLEEDING ON A SUCKING CHEST WOUND.

Weedmonk
October 24, 2008, 06:02 PM
I routinely carry a Glock G26 in a IWB kydex holster with a round chambered. People who feel compelled to carry their firearm empty should probably re-evaluate their choice of weapon and their decision to carry. IMO, the Saf-T-Blok is a very, very bad idea. It is fairly easy to dislodge this device when holstering the weapon - rendering it ineffective as a safety. I also think the Saf-T-Blok could interfere with the effective presentation and use of the weapon.

mgregg85
October 24, 2008, 06:11 PM
I sometimes carry an XD45(a lot like the glock, just with the extra safety of the grip safety) and when I do carry it, I carry it chambered and topped off. Its perfectly safe inside of a holster.

Ghost Walker
October 24, 2008, 10:17 PM
I carry my Glock in C-3. The only time in my life that I carried in C-0 I was returning from a long afternoon at the range. I stopped at a local Shop-Rite Supermarket to pick something up; and, as I walked down an aisle, I tripped and fell over a chair. As I pitched forward onto my face, the arm of this chair stripped my C-0 Glock out of my OTB Kydex holster and flipped that fully charged pistol a good 4' away from me. Happily, my C-0 Glock landed on the hard linoleum floor without going off. (Whew!) :uhoh:

The woman whom the muzzle ended up pointing at never said a word to me; she just stared in disbelief! However, the man standing behind her didn't quite feel the same way. :fire: The long and short of it is that accidents do happen! (Even to the most careful of people!) That is the last time I ever carried a Glock in C-0. Can you imagine what might have happened if my Glock had landed in accord with the DEA's test protocols from a height greater than 3' up, with the muzzle spinning, and onto a hard surface? (Actually, that almost DID happen!)

Everybody was very lucky that afternoon. All it takes is two hands and no more than an additional .35 second to complete a Mossad draw. As far as I'm concerned that's a small price to pay for; 'Doing unto others as you would want them to do unto you.' I continue to feel bad about what happened that afternoon. I wish I could say that I've forgiven myself; but, I haven't. As far as I'm concerned, it is just The Hand Of God that prevented something far more serious from occurring with my C-0 Glock.

Carry however you will; there's no law against it. Me? Unless they're rioting in the streets, I'm not ever going to carry a fully charged Glock like that again. ;)

johnnylaw53
October 25, 2008, 07:38 AM
If the trigger is so light you are afraid to carry with a round in the chamber get rid of it i understand your concern but if you carry a weapon not loaded and one without one in the chamber isn't loaded you are not prepare to use it if the need for it come up.

Be Safe

SCKimberFan
October 25, 2008, 08:28 AM
and racks it as he draws. :what:

Wow, he must be a real shooter! (Drawing to me is removing it from the holster.)

Racks it immediately after drawing, OK. :neener:

sinistr
October 25, 2008, 10:07 PM
actually garret machine has a very good video of the idf draw.remember,these people trust this system and their dealing with threats on a daily basis that we can only imagine.

GregGry
October 25, 2008, 11:31 PM
No, not I. Like the safety of an empty-chamber, and like that it takes only a frightening slide-slam to make an assailant crap-his-pants. Psychological effect is golden. Let them hear the hammer close upon a live round. I kill ONLY when no other channel exists within a split-second of reality. Shooting to wound is a military-dilemma, that must disappear swiftly. Considering that an assailant must die is ALWAYS a split-second decision. I ALWAYS preserve life for court decisions when PRACTICAL. cliffy
After having gone through actual shooting scenarios in police training (with simunition guns) had the gun not had one in the pipe, I would have not made it out "alive". Under stress you need a gun to do what you want it to do. If you need to take a shot, you need the camber loaded. The last thing you need to do is pull the trigger only to realize that the weapon is not hot, and then have to rack the action to be able to take a shot.

Realize that if your in a situation were you draw on another person that has a gun, that they will often respond in a manner to protect their life, which is to shoot at you. Carrying without a round in the pipe is about the same is carrying a air pistol. The whole psychological effect will get you killed as well. Under stress people get tunnel vision, and your hearing tends to go away. Someone thats robbing a store probably wouldn't even hear a shotgun racking if they are fighting with the clerk.

A lot of people don't realize how hard it is to be able to perform under stress. It really comes down to training, and unless some of you are spending a lot of time drawing, racking the action, the shooting, you are asking to be killed. Not to mention you are introducing the possibility of a failure to feed in the process. A properly functioning glock in a proper holster is not anymore dangerous with a round in the chamber. If you have poor trigger discipline, limited to no weapon training, and or you don't believe you could pull the trigger in self defense then you shouldn't be CCWing. Thats my opinion.

Ben86
October 25, 2008, 11:39 PM
Because Glocks have a drop safety I don't think it going off because of a loss of altitude is of much concern.

I mean I still don't want it dropped for a lot of reasons, one being just in case. However I am confident that it will not go off if it were to fall from my hip.

RKBABob
October 26, 2008, 08:18 AM
Ok, I'd better put on my flameproof suit for what I'm aout to say....

Maybe Glocks just aren't the prefect pistol for everyone. If you're uncomfortable with a short, light trigger pull and no safety, then get another pistol... definately don't be experimenting with funny safety devices that mount inside the trigger guard. :scrutiny:

A few suggestions:
Springfield XD - similar to a Glock trigger, but with a passive grip safety
1911 - even shorter trigger pull, but with a grip safety AND a manual safety
Sig - Decocker, long heavy 1st trigger pull as a safety

Find something you're comfortable with.

marshall3
December 18, 2008, 08:56 AM
No one has yet mentioned (I think) pocket carrying a GLOCK. I'm of the opinion that the GLOCK which is pocket carried should have an empty chamber. Pocket holsters, and the mechanics of drawing from a pocket, do not give much trigger safety.

Also, no one has talked about the dangers of carrying in a pocket while rearing a family. My grandchildren have their hands everywhere, and sometimes kids will stick their hands in YOUR pockets to see what is there, or just for the heck of it. In such a case, carrying a GLOCK with one in the chamber would be dangerous.

So, for pocket carry, let's not carry GLOCKS with chambered rounds, especially if you come into much contact with kids. Just my opinion.

rhoggman
December 18, 2008, 09:22 AM
I recently had this discussion with an army major, who has been deployed to Iraq twice. He was convinced that there is never a reason to have a round chambered, as it is unsafe. I got him to admit that it's not the practice that's unsafe, it's the average undertrained soldier.

No disrespect to anyone who has ever worn the uniform, as I have, but the military developes a lot of tactics, techniques, procedures, safety rules, et cetera based on the ability of the lowest common denominator. Furthermore, different weapons behave very differently. For example I would never walk around with an M16 and one in the chamber. All you have to do is bump the but of the gun into something, and BANG. The military has to keep it simple. They cannot have different sets of rules for every weapon, and expect that everyone remeber all of those rules all of the time. So basically they are told over and over again that it is unsafe to have a weapon with a round in the chamber. Hell, before you walk off of a range someone shoves a damn rod down your barrel just to make sure you are not being an idiot.

There are very few units that operate outside of this hyper-safety-pc-babersitter mentality. Those are the units where they have already weeded out the lowest common denominator. Only then will you find that everyone does not echo the same set of standards, but then again those are the same merit based communities that hand you a "noose" if you so wish to hang yourself. You don't get a whole lot of F&*k ups before you are out.

FoMoGo
December 18, 2008, 09:41 AM
Not a glock carrier OR a glock fan... nothing against the pistol, I know it is reliable and as safe as anything else if you know your weapon and are safe with it... the grip angle just throws me way off.
This being stated, I wouldnt feel unsafe at all carrying one in a proper holster. And by proper holster I mean one that covers the trigger and has a method of retention.
This is my rule with ANY holster, both my S&W .44 and my 1911 holsters follow this.
The thunder ranch .44 rides in a galco silhouette with a thumb break strap.
The RIA Match 1911 rides in a Bianchi Carrylok.
The 1911 is carried cocked and locked, and I have NO fears of a ND with it... unless I do something stupid.
I equate the trigger safety on the glock with the grip safety on the 1911, I have accidentally wiped the thumb safety on the 1911 while doing strenuous activities... and my reaction was no more than "Huh, safety is off" and flicked it back on.
I didnt feel any added fear that it was going to magically go off just sitting there.
I keep my bugger hook off the bang switch until I have target acquisition.
For someone not properly trained, or someone who just doesnt follow proper safety procedures... the glock isnt a good choice.
Now, that being said... NO gun is a proper choice for that person.
If I one day end up owning a glock, it will ride in a proper holster with a round chambered.
I may not have the time or ability to rack the slide when I need it... and it doesnt make that good of a club.


Jim

burningsquirrels
December 18, 2008, 09:52 AM
in reqponse to the thread title... absolutely one in the pipe. you may not always have the time or the free hand to rack the slide.

mtgmike
December 18, 2008, 10:11 AM
I havent read the whole thread, so this may be redundant.

My G30 (admittedly pretty new<200 rounds) is so hard to rack I would have very little confidence in being able to chamber a round in distress. ...and i'm 6'6" 230lbs, so its not like im weak.

burningsquirrels
December 18, 2008, 10:13 AM
exactly. and your weak hand may be busy holding valuables, or pushing/pulling a loved one out of the way. you should always put some time aside for practicing weak hand and strong hand shooting, drawing from concealment, and racking the slide and reloading with one hand. don't forget to use snap caps nad also do some dry fire practice once in a while.

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