choosing between brass


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KFDiesel
October 26, 2008, 09:17 AM
Midway USA has 2000 .223 brass from Win. for $383 in stock but the Rem is out of stock at$410. Is the win cheap stuff? Should I just order Rem and wait?
Thanks,
Kirk

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moooose102
October 26, 2008, 09:27 AM
i use a lot of winchester brass. it seems fine to me. i have not tried any of the real expensive brass like lapua or norma, so i can not comment on those. the only complaint i have is with my 300 win mag. it splits the necks after about 3 reloads. but it does that with winchester, remington, or federal. so i am annealing every neck, every time i load it, see if that helps.

KFDiesel
October 26, 2008, 04:27 PM
your doing what to the neck each time?

moosehunt
October 26, 2008, 07:43 PM
That is a good plan to anneal (provided it's done correctly), but no need or advantage in doing it every reloading. About every 5th (short end) to 7th loading will give you all the advantage you'll get, which indeed is significant.

ranger335v
October 26, 2008, 08:02 PM
"Midway USA has 2000 .223 brass from Win. for $383 in stock but the Rem is out of stock at$410. Is the win cheap stuff?"

Well, from your figures, WW is certainly less expensive. ??

Perhaps a better question is if the Rem is worth 6% percent more than WW. Depends on what you expect but probably not, at least not for me. WW brass tends to be both harder and thinner than RP. That means we can safely get a bit more powder in and do it safely but the cases will split sooner.

How long a case neck will last before splitting is largely determined by the difference between the fired diameter (chamber) and sized diameter (before it's expanded) AND how hard the brass is. For sure, the more any case gets worked, the quicker it splits.

Annealing sure changes that tho. But, poor annealing methods also damages the necks so you have to know what you are doing for it to work well enough to try.

KFDiesel
October 26, 2008, 09:30 PM
Very interesting. Thank you

moooose102
October 26, 2008, 10:28 PM
That is a good plan to anneal (provided it's done correctly), but no need or advantage in doing it every reloading. About every 5th (short end) to 7th loading will give you all the advantage you'll get, which indeed is significant.

well, considering i usually only get 3 reloads before the neck splits, i will never get to that point. so i figure i will go a different route and see what happens. if it works, great. if it doesnt. i will have to buy a lot of brass. same as not doing anything. i do not know why it happens. i keep the brass trimmed, i used to think it had to do with full length resizing. but i bought a hornady neck size die, and it still happened.

moosehunt
October 27, 2008, 01:01 PM
Normally, it shouldn't be necessary, but I suggest you try annealing the brass before you load it the first time, and see what happens. Keep in mind, annealing isn't rocket science, but indeed, it must be done correctly or nothing is gained, and in fact, a negative effect could be produced. Once I started annealing (multiple calibers/cartridges), I had excellent gains in case life, having very few neck splits in any cartridge prior to a dozen reloads, often quite a few more. I generally anneal at about every 6th or 7th loading. Now, my brass usually expires for something other than neck splits.

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