45 LC - Lee Factory Crimp Die or Redding Profiel Crimp


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RPCVYemen
November 7, 2008, 10:20 PM
I think I'd like try a roll crimp of some kind for my 45 LC - just as an experiment. I bought a Lyman set that included a taper crimp when I started reloading. I'd like to see the difference a roll crimp/profile crimp die would make.

What are people's thoughts about a Redding Profile Crimp Die vs and Lee Factory Crimp die (both are carbide, I think)?

Mike

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Walkalong
November 8, 2008, 09:36 AM
Redding by a mile.

The Redding crimp die crimps only. The Lee Carbide Factory Crimp Die post sizes the upper portion of the round.

BigJakeJ1s
November 8, 2008, 11:32 PM
I've never tried the Redding profile crimp, but it's got to be better than the 45 Colt CFCD I have. I now seat and crimp in one step with a Hornady die.

Andy

1858rem
November 9, 2008, 12:05 AM
how much crimp do you put on a .45 colt? i was shooting off my reloads earlier and had one scare me half to death! i wonder what kind of pressure increase crimps can make? im using a lee classic loader lol and any of the above mentioned could make a more consistent(and faster) crimp than that

nicholst55
November 9, 2008, 02:37 AM
I use and strongly recommend the Redding Profile Crimp die in .45 Colt and any other heavy recoiling revolvers that it's available for.

IMHO the Lee FCD is a solution in search of a problem.

RPCVYemen
November 9, 2008, 10:19 PM
Dagnabbit, I wish I had read you guys before I ordered the Lee Factory Crimp die before I ordered it. :)

I had heard some good things about the FCD - but you guys are pretty uniform in your crticism. Oh well.

Mike

Uncle Chan
November 9, 2008, 10:31 PM
I use only the Lee FCD for my 45 LC competition loads. Works PERFECTLY. I strongly recommend it.

ants
November 9, 2008, 10:40 PM
OK, let's not bash the Lee FCD. It is superior to the vast majority of crimp dies, it is independent of case length, and it also acts as a finishing die over the whole body. There is nothing wrong with that.

But the Redding Profile Crimp Die is absolutely excellent for roll crimps when your cases are reasonably well trimmed. This is true not because the die employs secret proprietary technology, it's true because the die is very uniform and is very finely produced and finished. But if your case lengths are all over the map, don't expect the Profile Crimp Die to perform miracles.

BigJakeJ1s
November 10, 2008, 10:22 PM
Since when is it not allowed to tell about negative experiences with a Lee CFCD?

I tried it, and it did not work well. It is certainly NOT superior to the vast majority of crimp dies. The only time it 'finishes' the cartridge is if non-uniform length cases caused buckling, which it will "iron out". The resulting cartridges will chamber and fire, but accuracy cannot be helped by that. The better solution is to ensure that case lengths are uniform in the first place. I get better quality, more uniform crimps from my Hornady 45 colt seater die, while seating the bullet no less. My CFCD left a very rough, scraped outer surface of the rolled case mouth, which was not even completely rolled inward. It was as if the ID of the crimping lip was too large, letting the case mouth "slip under it" rather than completing the roll into the canelure. I have seen that exact same appearance on gun show reloads, and they told me they used the Lee CFCD, so I don't think my experience was unique.

If I understand it correctly, the Redding Profile Crimp die first removes any flare on the case mouth with a tapered section that leads up to the lip that rolls the case mouth inward. And as mentioned, fit and finish are quite good, inside and out.

Andy

Walkalong
November 11, 2008, 08:47 AM
As ants mentioned, your cases must be uniform to get the total benifit of the Redding die. They work very, well if your cases are reasonably consistent. If you don't want to bother to trim your revolver brass at least once when you first get it, (I trim after one fireing) then the "flex" built into the Lee die can help if your case lengths differ a great deal. I don't like the Lee die because the ones I tried in .45 ACP post sized way too much.

rcmodel
November 11, 2008, 11:14 AM
i was shooting off my reloads earlier and had one scare me half to death! i wonder what kind of pressure increase crimps can make?No amount of heavy crimp will raise pressure enough to make a load "scare you half to death"!
Or even be noticeable on anything except a chronograph.

I'd look for another blip in your loading procedure to blame that one on!

RPCVYemen
November 11, 2008, 12:33 PM
Well, I guess that I will have to buy a Redding die, too, and compare them. :)

Mike

Ol` Joe
November 11, 2008, 12:42 PM
Quote:
i was shooting off my reloads earlier and had one scare me half to death! i wonder what kind of pressure increase crimps can make?

No amount of heavy crimp will raise pressure enough to make a load "scare you half to death"!
Or even be noticeable on anything except a chronograph.

I'd look for another blip in your loading procedure to blame that one on!

I agree.
A loose crimp that allowed the bullet to move under recoil will though. I`d check my cartridges while shooting to see if they are staying put as a 1st place to look. Fire 5 from a full cylinder and remeasure the 6th to see if the bullet is staying in place. Try it a couple times.

Ben Shepherd
November 11, 2008, 12:47 PM
I've tried the lee offering on 38/357. It does work well.

But the redding is a superior product, IMO, by a mile. I use the redding proflie die on 38/357, 41 &44 mag, and 45 colt exclusively now. My chrono and target data have sold me on them.

WESHOOT2 of TFL and RugerForums turned me onto them years ago. Glad he did.

Larry E
November 11, 2008, 06:40 PM
The Profile Crimp die seems to apply some sizing to the top of the case over the bullet shank as it applies the roll crimp on the .45 Colt and .357.

If you experience greatly increased pressures in a handgun load it sure ain't due to a heavy crimp, but more likely because the bullet somehow got seated deeper. An increase in seating depth by 1/16" on a case the size of a .38 Spl will raise pressures enough to make things potentially exciting. A double charge of powder will almost guarantee shrapnel, but in a strong gun with a normally light load might just give way more noise and recoil.

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