Bulletproof Vests?


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Ron-Bon
November 13, 2008, 12:41 PM
What is everyone's stance on bullet-proof vests? Are they a necessity or do you think they are too cumbersome to be worn daily, thereby reducing their chances of protecting one's life. Also, are the purchases of vests as closely regulated as firearms(i.e. background checks, waiting periods, etc.)?

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Jeff White
November 13, 2008, 12:46 PM
What do you do in your everyday life that puts you at such risk that you think you need to wear one?

I wore one everyday in my job as a police officer. They are hot, uncomfortable and I wouldn't recommend them to anyone who after a careful assessment of their lifestyle and risks, really could justify the expense and discomfort.

The only laws regulating them I'm aware of are laws that make it illegal to wear one while committing a crime. Some companies and distributors have internal policies restricting sales to sworn personnel. But there are plenty of places to buy them.

Ron-Bon
November 13, 2008, 12:51 PM
I don't do anything in my everyday life that makes a vest necessary, however I do live in a moderately high crime urban area. And I have also been shot before so I always have in the back of my mind that violence can take place anywhere, regardless of one's lifestyle

I just wanted to know how others felt about bullet-proof vests.

cbrgator
November 13, 2008, 01:06 PM
Most people on here will recommend not getting one. I've seen this question asked many time before. My stance is that it's not very practical, but if it helps you sleep at night....

AllisonDT
November 13, 2008, 01:09 PM
Keep in mind that there's really no such thing as a "bullet-proof" vest. They're merely different grades of resistence. :p

mnrivrat
November 13, 2008, 01:12 PM
To the best of my knowledge they are seldom popular for regular usage. Both because of their expense, and the discomfort of wearing them as pointed out.

There may be special occasion where one would come in handy for those who's regular work does not require them, but mostly I believe they would be a waste of money for the average person.

That said, it is always a personal choice based on ones assesment of their needs, and the bullet resistant vests are available without restriction in most area of the country.

jackdanson
November 13, 2008, 01:15 PM
If I lived in an area where I thought it necessary to wear a vest I would invest the money in moving, not buying a vest.

Animal Mother
November 13, 2008, 01:30 PM
I'll admit I've toyed with the idea of buying a used one for a SHTF stash but I don't know how practical it would be.

RippinSVT
November 13, 2008, 01:32 PM
I've got one, it just sits in my basement until the apocolypse.

Eyesac
November 13, 2008, 01:33 PM
If I was doing any kind of security work, I would, walking around town or mowing the lawn...? Absolutely not.

ZombieHunter
November 13, 2008, 01:35 PM
ewww...used vest = bad idea imo.
they have life expectancies and you don't know how the other guy used it or stored or took care of it

Ron-Bon
November 13, 2008, 01:37 PM
@ jackdanson: That is propably the most sound advice I could hope to recieve

30 cal slob
November 13, 2008, 01:37 PM
it's nice to have it if you feel you need it.

i've spent a lot of time in pistol and carbine classes, and in several of them, body armor was REQUIRED kit (shoothouse).

thing is, when it's 90 degrees out and humid, it really sucks to wear even soft armor. on the flip side, when it's freezing out, body armor has the added benefit of helping you stay warm.

so i guess it depends on where you live (weather) and what circumstances might dictate the use of it (high crime areas).

lots of options out there ... check out http://www.bulletproofme.com

expvideo
November 13, 2008, 01:41 PM
I own a vest and it stays in the trunk of my car. I figure I'll probably never need it, but if I do, I'd like to have it close by.

I used to work in a night club that had a lot of violence, so I thought that a vest was a good idea to have. Nowadays, I only wear it if I'm going to the range, since a lot of idiots shoot at public ranges and don't know the 4 rules of safe gun handling.

I would not wear a vest every day unless I worked in a dangerous profession that required it. I do like knowing that I have one in my trunk, though and I wouldn't say it's a bad investment.

I keep a lot of useful stuff in my trunk. Almost all of it is in my emergency duffle bag. The vest is not in the bag, because I figure in the off chance that I need it, I'll probably need it quickly and won't want to be digging through a bag to get it. I know that it isn't doing me any good if I'm not wearing it, but I don't find myself in enough situations where I need it anymore.

Jeff White
November 13, 2008, 01:58 PM
I own a vest and it stays in the trunk of my car.

You are most likely greatly shortening it's useful lifespan. By how much depends on what the armor is made of and what temperature extremes occur where you live.

expvideo
November 13, 2008, 02:07 PM
You are most likely greatly shortening it's useful lifespan. By how much depends on what the armor is made of and what temperature extremes occur where you live.

I live in Washington. The temperature almost never goes above 90 degrees or below 30. Our average is about 50 degrees.

Besides, of all of the equipment I own, I think the vest is my least concern, or second only to my gas mask which I am almost certain I will never need. Both of these things are kind of embarassing to admit to owning, but cheap enough that it would be unwise (IMO) not to. I only ever bought the gas mask because it was cheap, and I got a great deal on the vest, which is only a level IIa.

RKBABob
November 13, 2008, 02:21 PM
Yes, go ahead and buy one, but get the bulkiest one that will fit under a shirt... you know, one that will make your chest and shoulders look huge. That way, potential attackers will take one look at you and think "My Gawd! Lookit the size of that guy! I ain't gonna mess wit him!" :neener: Or you could wear football pads.

I don't own one, but from what I've observed, they aren't exactly discrete for day-to-day dress. I'd imagine it would get left behind a lot. Still, I wouldn't mind having one for the pracice range.

And I have also been shot before so I always have in the back of my mind that violence can take place anywhere, regardless of one's lifestyleSorry to hear that, Ron-Bon. I'd probably want a vest after that, too.

expvideo
November 13, 2008, 02:26 PM
I don't do anything in my everyday life that makes a vest necessary, however I do live in a moderately high crime urban area. And I have also been shot before so I always have in the back of my mind that violence can take place anywhere, regardless of one's lifestyle


Me too. It was part of what helped me to talk myself into buying one.

If I lived in an area where I thought it necessary to wear a vest I would invest the money in moving, not buying a vest.

I make about $30k, I have horrible credit, and I live in one of the most expensive states in the nation. Where exactly is this safer neighborhood that I can afford to live in?

average_shooter
November 13, 2008, 02:31 PM
What do you do in your everyday life that puts you at such risk that you think you need to wear one?

If I lived in an area where I thought it necessary to wear a vest I would invest the money in moving, not buying a vest.

Let's be cautious here. People have said the very same things about firearms.

Jeff White
November 13, 2008, 02:50 PM
Quote:
I don't do anything in my everyday life that makes a vest necessary, however I do live in a moderately high crime urban area. And I have also been shot before so I always have in the back of my mind that violence can take place anywhere, regardless of one's lifestyle

Me too. It was part of what helped me to talk myself into buying one.

If violence can take place at any time, then it's not going to do you any good in the trunk of your car. Let's face it, no one can live any kind of risk free life. Every one of us makes trade offs between comfort, convenience and safety. If you are going someplace where the threat level is high enough that you think you need to wear bnody armor, then maybe you should rethink going there. Few of us have to go to those kinds of places.

expvideo
November 13, 2008, 03:12 PM
If violence can take place at any time, then it's not going to do you any good in the trunk of your car. Let's face it, no one can live any kind of risk free life. Every one of us makes trade offs between comfort, convenience and safety. If you are going someplace where the threat level is high enough that you think you need to wear bnody armor, then maybe you should rethink going there. Few of us have to go to those kinds of places.
I completely agree. I doubt I'll ever need it because I avoid going to places that I don't feel safe. And if I ever do need it, I'll probably need it immediately. But I'd still rather have it close by than choose between wearing it all the time and leaving it at home. I can't think of a scenario that I would need it in, but you never know. I just feel more comfortable knowing that it's there if I need it.

Ragnar Danneskjold
November 13, 2008, 03:16 PM
If you've got a bunch of money lying around, go ahead and get one and keep it next to your bed for bumps in the night. Unless you are in a risky job like police or (some)security, there isn't much point to wearing one every day. It will be far more work than it's worth.

jnyork
November 13, 2008, 03:51 PM
If I lived in an area where I thought it necessary to wear a vest I would invest the money in moving, not buying a vest.

I cant imagine anyone continuing to live in an area where they have to consider wearing a bullet proof vest. There has not been enough money PRINTED to make me stay in a place like that. Tell us where you live in Everett so I can be sure to stay the hell out of there. :scrutiny:

30 cal slob
November 13, 2008, 03:57 PM
not too long ago i picked up a new level IIIA soft armor vest for around $400.

i guess it boils down to how much you think your life is worth. me, i'd rather not have to wear it every day , that is, move out of a high-crime area, but if you can't for whatever reason, what's $400-$600 compared to your life?

expvideo
November 13, 2008, 04:04 PM
i guess it boils down to how much you think your life is worth. me, i'd rather not have to wear it every day , that is, move out of a high-crime area, but if you can't for whatever reason, what's $400-$600 compared to your life?

That's a load of crap and you know it. You could say the same thing about any major purchase, and just because I can't afford to spend $400-600 on a vest doesn't mean I don't value my life. You don't have to come in here and be a snob and act like those of us that can't afford to pay for added safety don't value our lives. I'm really sick of this attitude.

Jeff White
November 13, 2008, 04:15 PM
I don't think this discussion is about what kind of protection one can afford, but it's about how we should spend our limited resources on protection, specifically if body armor is worth the cost.

Ultimately that's a decision everyone has to make for himself. Personally, I haven't worn body armor since I retired and don't foresee wearing any. My IIIA armor I wore on duty is in the cedar chest at the foot of the bed and my RAV with IIIA soft armor and ceramic level IV plates is in the gun room with the rest of my old tac team gear that was personally purchased. I'm hanging onto that for use in shoothouse training at classes. If it wasn't for that, I'd probably sell it.

If I was still a police officer, or a taxi driver, convenience store clerk in a very bad area or a similar occupation I would wear body armor regularly. Short of that, it's not necessary for my lifestyle.

Maelstrom
November 13, 2008, 04:24 PM
I might consider wearing it between Thanksgiving and Christmas, since 'tis the season to be robbed.

30 cal slob
November 13, 2008, 05:41 PM
That's a load of crap and you know it. You could say the same thing about any major purchase, and just because I can't afford to spend $400-600 on a vest doesn't mean I don't value my life. You don't have to come in here and be a snob and act like those of us that can't afford to pay for added safety don't value our lives. I'm really sick of this attitude.

i think you're reading too much into my post.

of course it is absurd to say that just because you don't buy body armor, you don't value your life.

in relative terms, however, it's cheaper to buy body armor than to move to a new neighborhood. in that context, what's $400 to protect your life?

Gunnerpalace
November 13, 2008, 05:47 PM
If ya got it cool,

If ya don't cool,

Whatever you want

I would recommend (If you are going to be protecting family) a Kevlar Blanket, Oh and don't worry what the haters say, it is not mn to own one.

everallm
November 13, 2008, 05:58 PM
One of the minuses of having, but not using body armor, on a periodic basis is you forget how they change/restrict your body movement.

If you don't get into as habit of putting it on and moving with it at least now and again you quickly forget.

Beren
November 13, 2008, 07:53 PM
It's your money. I've thought about purchasing some "just because" but I have no practical use for it.

http://bulletproofme.com/
http://www.practicaltactical.net/prostores/servlet/-strse-Protective-Equipment/Categories

JImbothefiveth
November 13, 2008, 07:56 PM
a Kevlar Blanket
I think you were joking, but those actually exist : http://bulletproofme.com/Ballistic-Blankets.shtml

A vest seems like a good idea to me, if you're going to have to shoot, isn't there a good chance you will get shot. (Of course, I've never worn one, so they are probably more uncomfortable than I imagine)

Mike Sr.
November 13, 2008, 08:54 PM
Now that I have my CCW I want a BP vest!

Andy-Y
November 13, 2008, 09:17 PM
I have a vest that I got when I did repo work in Flint, MI. It still didn't give me a very "safe feeling":uhoh: . But it sits in the gun room now.

I do think it's odd that people berate others over wanting body armor, only because the arguments they use, i.e. "you should move" :rolleyes: "you must be paranoid" :scrutiny:, could apply equally to carrying a firearm, and most people on this board do carry. So if you want some, do it, and don't let people tell you otherwise.

Just my $0.02

10-41Trooper
November 14, 2008, 09:09 AM
What is everyone's stance on bullet-proof vests? Are they a necessity or do you think they are too cumbersome to be worn daily, thereby reducing their chances of protecting one's life. Also, are the purchases of vests as closely regulated as firearms(i.e. background checks, waiting periods, etc.)?

I wear one for my job but for the life of me, I can't think of a reason why a regular citizen would wear one unless they work in a job that could possibly bring them into harms way.

expvideo
November 14, 2008, 09:34 AM
i think you're reading too much into my post.

of course it is absurd to say that just because you don't buy body armor, you don't value your life.

in relative terms, however, it's cheaper to buy body armor than to move to a new neighborhood. in that context, what's $400 to protect your life?
I'm just tired of hearing "isn't your life worth $x" on every gun board I read. Sure I value my life, but I also have a very low income. I'm really tired of having people tell me that I don't just because I won't spend my rent and food money on level III body armor. I didn't take your post out of context. It is you that apparently doesn't understand how it could be taken in an offensive way.

Being of low income, I manage to have weapons that I shoot as often as I can, which is not very often, a cell phone, a vest, a breakdown kit and other stuff that I see as necessary in my daily life. But I still have to listen to this BS that I don't value my life because I won't fork out $400 for a nice vest, or $1000 for some actual training, or whatever else I'm told "isn't your life worth more than". I value my life enough to do everything I can to protect it. Spending my food and rent budget on a fancy vest or instruction is not an option. Maybe instead of trying to convince me that I'm misunderstanding your point, you should rethink your point and consider that what is reasonable money to spend for you is not what is reasonable money to spend for me. When was the last time you had to make $50 last 2 weeks? Think about it. Choose between food and gas to get to work, and then have someone tell you that you must not value your life or you would spend $400 on a vest or move to a nicer neighborhood.

Erik
November 14, 2008, 10:00 AM
I can't remember ever meeting anyone who regularly wore a bullet proof vest outside of law enforcement, military, and security circles; and then only on duty.

I have met folks who bought them, believing that they would wear them regularly, before relegating them to the closet or trunk, and eventually disposing of them after the expiration date. An expensive lesson in perceived vs. practical priorities.

Erik
November 14, 2008, 10:02 AM
I have also met folks who purchased armor to back rifle plates, with the obvious intention of only being deployed as needed and with an understanding, or at least a more realistic understanding, of the odds.

franconialocal
November 14, 2008, 10:25 AM
Mr. White is right on..... I wear one every day for work and it's hot, rigid, bulky ("you look fat"....ummm....ma'am, it's just the vest"). Oddly enough, on my days OFF my back tends to hurt from being "splinted" all week, it smells, etc. etc. Also, they may only be rated for certain calibers, won't stop slow kinetic attacks like ice picks, large knives, etc. Overall I feel "better" wearing one at work. They do have limitations, however, before considering wearing one. Also, to stress, they MAY BE AGAINST THE LAW to own/use in your area. Felony in some areas.....is it worth it??:)

Ron-Bon
November 14, 2008, 10:34 AM
and eventually disposing of them after the expiration date


I hope no one laughs at me, but I was not even aware that bullet-proof vest had expiration dates. Why is that so? does the material deteriorate over time?

average_shooter
November 14, 2008, 10:40 AM
I hope no one laughs at me, but I was not even aware that bullet-proof vest had expiration dates. Why is that so? does the material deteriorate over time?

Kevlar and its close cousins in the Bullet Resistant materials arena are synthetic fibers. Like Nylon they can deteriorate, especially if repeatedly exposed to UV light, like sunlight.

Rock climbers deal with similar issues in that the synthetic fiber ropes used can also deteriorate over time even without extreme use, just by being out in the sun.

If kept in cool, dark, dry places the odds of significant deterioration are greatly reduced. But repeated exposure to extreme conditions or sunlight can have negative impacts on the materials.

30 cal slob
November 14, 2008, 10:46 AM
It is you that apparently doesn't understand how it could be taken in an offensive way.

try decaf next time.

you know, the whole world isn't trying to piss in your corn flakes every morning. :rolleyes:

Ron-Bon
November 14, 2008, 10:51 AM
Many Thanks @ AverageShooter

expvideo
November 14, 2008, 10:58 AM
try decaf next time.

you know, the whole world isn't trying to piss in your corn flakes every morning.
I see there isn't going to be any understanding here. Enjoy your valuable and well invested in life. I hope it is long and comfortable and that you never have to understand where I am coming from.

Picard
November 14, 2008, 11:34 AM
Let's be straight-up with regard to this question. How many of us own EBR's or other evil-looking guns just in case of a civil uprising? That is the spirit of the 2nd Amendment, is it not?

I'm not one to look for trouble but, in that sort of situation, if trouble comes to you, a bullet-proof vest is a crucial survival tool and often makes the difference between life and death. Having a rifle for this purpose but nothing more is only being partly prepared, IMO.

woodybrighton
November 14, 2008, 12:06 PM
body Armour sucks big time wearing it day in day would suck a lot especially if not job related.
if its seriously that bad time to get the hell out:(

zoom6zoom
November 14, 2008, 12:42 PM
I don't feel the need to wear it in my everyday life, but I've considered one to wear when I'm at the range, what with some of the morons encountered there.

Bix
November 14, 2008, 12:56 PM
I'm hanging onto that for use in shoothouse training at classes. If it wasn't for that, I'd probably sell it.


This is one of the few practical reasons I can see for folks not 'on the job' to spend the money on armor. If you take a lot of classes, you may eventually find yourself looking at one that requires armor. Such classes often have loaner gear, but some do not. If you fall into this category, it may make sense to keep your eyes peeled for good deals on this type of gear.

A side benefit is that a vest or plate provides a nice, portable backstop for dry fire practice. There are, of course, cheaper alternatives ;)

workingstiff
November 14, 2008, 07:21 PM
If anybody has a dear loved one who sews, or if you're handy with a sewing machine: just build a jacket out of bedsheets. I hear they make dandy bullet stops. :neener:

wbond
November 16, 2008, 04:30 AM
I saw an episode on "COPS" or some similar show where a police officer did a traffic stop on a guy and somehow realized the guy was wearing a vest.

The cop went ballistic on the guy and threw him on the ground and treated him like he was armed and dangerous just because he was wearing a vest.

After roughing the guy up, cuffing him, and heatedly questioning him and searching him and his car, the cop finally realized the guy had done nothing wrong and let him go, but not until after substantial physical abuse and heated questioning and accusations, and an admonishment to not wear a vest if he didn't want to be treated like that.

Apparently a guy wearing a vest is assumed guilty of something until proven innocent.

However, any citizen who wants to wear one should be able to wear one without being treated as a criminal, and if a riot happened, I'd want a vest and my handgun and rifle. I mean something like the L.A. riots. Even better, a gassed-up car to get the hell out of there.

Destructo6
November 16, 2008, 06:46 PM
I wear concealable soft body armor 10+ hrs a day, 5 or more days a week. It's not required, but with all of the shooting going on around here, I'm starting to look at Dragon Skin.

My biggest complaint with the soft armor is that it stinks. Really. It smells like a cat peed down my shirt after just a few minutes of wearing it. Every time I move, I get a waft of it through the shirt neck. I've tried just about everything to get rid of the stink, but nothing has worked.

If you buy one, get fitted. US Armor has fitting instructions on their website.

Erik
November 16, 2008, 07:40 PM
I recommend looking elsewhere. DS is less is a no-go; a case of the product failing to live up to the press release.

Vegaslaith
November 16, 2008, 07:47 PM
Is Dragon Skin the same price as say, level IIA body armor?

Erik
November 16, 2008, 07:56 PM
As for what to get, get a 100% woven p-aramid vests (Kevlar or Twaron) which passes the FBI Body Armor Test Protocol, found here:

http://www.bidsync.com/DPXViewer/FBI_TEST_2006.pdf?ac=auction&auc=108034&rndid=338514&docid=748537

The Deer Hunter
November 16, 2008, 08:29 PM
The only laws regulating them I'm aware of are laws that make it illegal to wear one while committing a crime. Some companies and distributors have internal policies restricting sales to sworn personnel. But there are plenty of places to buy them.

Hahahaha this is great!

If the guy is breaking the law already, do you think he cares if wearing the vest is illegal or not?

Erik
November 16, 2008, 09:49 PM
Oh, on vest expirations...

Vest warranties expire; warranties which, seemingly, differ from nation to nation. The US standard being 5 years.

Vests... Well, there are older vests (>5 years) which have been tested to adequately stop rated ammunition and newer vests (> 5 years) which have been tested to not stop rated ammunition. Not even talking about the tests themselves. Which tests and under what conditions, etc?

Best of luck in the decision making process.

BullfrogKen
November 16, 2008, 11:31 PM
There seems to be some fascination with body armor, and I'm not sure where it comes from.

I have IIA body armor. I bought it about 4 or 5 years ago to wear while ROing the shoothouses on the range.

I've never once worn it outside those circumstances. Even though it's designed for daily wear, it's still hot, bulky, and restrictive. If it weren't a mandate from their superiors, I know a few cops wouldn't wear it every day. I know one supervisor that had to yell at or even write up a few subordinates they constantly caught working without it on.


If I had a job that carried high risks of danger, I might wear it. Even then I might not wear it every day.


Do your risk assessment. And if you want some, go get it. I'm not aware of any laws against body armor other than ones that attach when accused of committing criminal acts. Your locality might have one, so don't rely on the internet to answer that question. Make sure for yourself.

scythefwd
November 16, 2008, 11:54 PM
ok, here is my take.

I have never worn a bpv. I have only worn a flak jacket. It was 20 lbs of discomfort. The interceptor body armor was more comfortable, but it weighed a ton with the sappy plates in them. If your vest fits you, you are heavier, and you don't bend as well, but you don't have that much limited movement (unless you are wearing plates, I can see how they really affect your movement). I think I could go back to a flak jacket without any relearning curve in movement, but I did wear it for 18 hours or more a day for over a year. I literally slept in it for the first 2 months in the desert.

mbt2001
November 17, 2008, 09:31 AM
I believe that there are a Just In Case addition to your SHTF gear... Laugh all you want people, but if you feel you need a gun for personal protection (we all do) then how can you say it isn't wise to purchase a bullet proof vest as further assurance that you will come away from the encounter? I will honest here, it is unlikely that you will ever need a vest or that you will have time to put it on, but it does go part and parcel with a preparedness mindset.

expvideo
November 17, 2008, 09:38 AM
ok, here is my take.

I have never worn a bpv. I have only worn a flak jacket. It was 20 lbs of discomfort. The interceptor body armor was more comfortable, but it weighed a ton with the sappy plates in them. If your vest fits you, you are heavier, and you don't bend as well, but you don't have that much limited movement (unless you are wearing plates, I can see how they really affect your movement). I think I could go back to a flak jacket without any relearning curve in movement, but I did wear it for 18 hours or more a day for over a year. I literally slept in it for the first 2 months in the desert.
A flak jacket is not the same thing. A level IIa vest weighs maybe 2 pounds at most and is actually very flexible. They get hot, so I'm not saying they're comfortable to wear, but it's not the weight or flexibility that are the issue.

scythefwd
November 17, 2008, 11:38 AM
Actually, the large flak jacket the military issues is 18lbs. I weighed it. Just like the kevlar helmet is 7 lbs, the saw is around 18 (with ammo attached) the m16 is approx 8 (with mag in) and the gas mask is around 3.

HarleyFixer
November 18, 2008, 11:42 AM
I make about $30k, I have horrible credit, and I live in one of the most expensive states in the nation. Where exactly is this safer neighborhood that I can afford to live in?
Alabama

expvideo
November 18, 2008, 11:49 AM
I make about $30k, I have horrible credit, and I live in one of the most expensive states in the nation. Where exactly is this safer neighborhood that I can afford to live in?
Alabama
You're a big help.

The Lone Haranguer
November 18, 2008, 06:44 PM
I lead a very low risk life style. ;) I don't mind strapping on a handgun and reload, but wearing body armor in addition to that crosses the fine line between prepared and paranoid.

coloradokevin
November 18, 2008, 06:56 PM
Ehhh...

Just me talking here, but I hate wearing those things! I wear a vest all week for LE work... It is hot in the summer, cold in the winter, holds sweat in like a plastic bag, and isn't so comfortable.

I sure don't wear it when I'm not at work, but that's just me talking here.

Sir Aardvark
November 18, 2008, 07:47 PM
I can't see wearing body armor every day just because you "might" get shot - the only time I feel it would be warranted is if you are in a High Risk category that has been previously mentioned, such as: taxi-driver, liquor store clerk, cop, etc.


So... with that being said, I would feel more comfortable going to the indoor shooting range while wearing body armor.
It's not that I fear for my life while I am there, but, they occasionaly let in some bozo's who don't know what they are doing, and you have to keep a carefull eye on them to assure that there are no accidents.

RX-178
November 18, 2008, 08:00 PM
I purchased some body armor, and used to wear it to the range when I just started shooting. I mean, for a beginning shooter, wearing body armor in an environment where bullets flying through the air is NORMAL made good sense to me.

That lasted about a week. Now it's just part of my collection of military and otherwise 'tacticool' paraphernalia.

xx7grant7x
November 18, 2008, 08:23 PM
The only laws regulating them I'm aware of are laws that make it illegal to wear one while committing a crime. Some companies and distributors have internal policies restricting sales to sworn personnel. But there are plenty of places to buy them.
Hahahaha this is great!

If the guy is breaking the law already, do you think he cares if wearing the vest is illegal or not?
__________________

as an aside, and kind of related post, just like with firearms, felons are not supposed to own body armor and are restricted by law from doing so

GregGry
November 18, 2008, 08:39 PM
Every time I think of a used vest the smell of urine comes to mind...

Vegaslaith
November 18, 2008, 10:32 PM
as an aside, and kind of related post, just like with firearms, felons are not supposed to own body armor and are restricted by law from doing so

Felons can't own kevlar? Really? Since when, the North Hollywood robbery?

Erik
November 23, 2008, 05:35 PM
"Violent felons" cannot own body armor unless there they can prove a legitimate, employment based need.

18 USC 931

Sec. 931. Prohibition on purchase, ownership, or possession of body
armor by violent felons

(a) In General. - Except as provided in subsection (b), it shall
be unlawful for a person to purchase, own, or possess body armor,
if that person has been convicted of a felony that is -

(1) a crime of violence (as defined in section 16); or

(2) an offense under State law that would constitute a crime of
violence under paragraph (1) if it occurred within the special
maritime and territorial jurisdiction of the United States.
(b) Affirmative Defense. -

(1) In general. - It shall be an affirmative defense under this
section that -

(A) the defendant obtained prior written certification from

his or her employer that the defendant's purchase, use, or

possession of body armor was necessary for the safe performance

of lawful business activity; and

(B) the use and possession by the defendant were limited to

the course of such performance.

(2) Employer. - In this subsection, the term "employer" means
any other individual employed by the defendant's business that
supervises defendant's activity. If that defendant has no
supervisor, prior written certification is acceptable from any
other employee of the business.

woodybrighton
November 24, 2008, 03:23 AM
seems fair enough to me violent bank robber with a vest he's not owning it because its tacicool is he:uhoh:
Wearing body Armour if stopped by the police I would assume the person is up to no good its not normal and linked to guns etc not what you want to deal with :(

expvideo
November 24, 2008, 08:57 AM
seems fair enough to me violent bank robber with a vest he's not owning it because its tacicool is he
Wearing body Armour if stopped by the police I would assume the person is up to no good its not normal and linked to guns etc not what you want to deal with
Then it's a good thing you're not a cop. You can't jump to conclusions like that. Everyone has a different set of circumstances and you need to think outside of the box. He could have had a traumatic experience as a hostage and now he likes to wear body armor. Maybe he's on his way home from work as an armored car driver. Jumping to judgement and detaining someone who hasn't broken the law is not only unethical, it's also illegal.

mbt2001
November 24, 2008, 10:47 AM
Jumping to judgement and detaining someone who hasn't broken the law is not only unethical, it's also illegal.

It's tyrannical and disguisting. Doing something JUST BECAUSE YOU CAN is the HEIGHT of hubris.

I have 2 Kevlar (army surplus) vests and 2 (army surplus) PASGT helmets. I got the whole package for under $250 and IF the SHTF then perhaps they may be the margin...

You just never bloody well know what you are going to need and it seemed stupid to be able to get all of the above for under $250 and not do it...

If I had lots of cash, I would have 2 x ACH helmets or Levell III PASGT Helmets, 2 x Modular Tactical Vests, 2 x Level IIA concealable vests and 2 x Level III concealable vests. Not to mention an array of night vision and thermal equipment. Maybe I am a geek or something... :(

expvideo
November 24, 2008, 10:49 AM
If I had lots of cash, I would have 2 x ACH helmets or Levell III PASGT Helmets, 2 x Interceptor Vests, 2 x Level IIA concealable vests and 2 x Level III concealable vests. Not to mention an array of night vision and thermal equipment. Maybe I am a geek or something...
No. You just like military gear. There's nothing wrong with that.

woodybrighton
November 24, 2008, 04:47 PM
didn't say I'd use force or detain the bloke but I'd be on high alert till I knew what I was dealing with:(.
It is possible to think something is seriously seriously wrong and remain calm and polite with the suspects.
case in point checkpoint in ulster routine routine car stops 50 yds away and sits there:uhoh: not normal possible proxy bomb, come on etc
turns out lost tourist not expecting an armed fort:D and panicked.
not sure who was more relived when it was resolved but those 50yds were a very long walk:(

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