lee dippers vs. lee safety scale, made an oddly loud BOOM!


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1858rem
November 13, 2008, 11:59 PM
ok, so i had been loading .45 colt 255g rmfp using the lee dippers, i thought i was throwing 8.5g of unique, but after zeroing in my new lee safety scale and checking my throw weights, it was actually only a 5.9g charge! when i checked what i thought i was throwing 3.5g of titegroup turned out to be only 2.6g! the scale is dead zero, i was wondering if anyone had a lee(the 20$ beam scale) that was off, or if it was just the dippers.... oh yah and "5.8g" trailboss was more like 4.5g. the loads shot pretty well and accurate, descant recoil, but only once in the .38 and once in my .45 the shot was MUCH louder, first i thought i overloaded a case mebbe, guns were fine an i more thoroughly double checked powder level in the cases from then till now, but could it be i actually undercharged the cases? :confused:

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cobra2411
November 14, 2008, 12:26 AM
My lee scale is dead on. I don't use the dipper, I use the auto-disk. Unique does have some issues metering through the AD, so I do tend to check weights very often.

Make sure the scale is level and take time to zero it before you start.

ants
November 14, 2008, 12:44 AM
The dippers are notorious for being short.

Nevertheless, read the manual that came with your scale and make certain you know how to use it. If set up properly, the scale is plenty accurate. The dippers are not.

jhansman
November 14, 2008, 01:13 AM
I use the Lee dippers, but I also check them for weight. I have made several 'custom' dippers for specific powders, which I also check. Being able to charge cases with the Powder Through Expander die without having to weigh every charge is a great convenience, but only if it is safe.

fireflyfather
November 14, 2008, 03:02 AM
There's a certain amount of skill needed to use dippers safely. The first skill is filling the dippers consistently (pushing it down into the powder and letting the powder fall into the cavity, then leveling with a card instead of scooping the dipper through the powder). The second is knowing how and when to check your charge weights. Neither is very difficult.

The key rule, though, is to NEVER USE AN UNCALIBRATED DIPPER. You have to check the charge weights on a scale with EVERY new batch of powder to make sure it's consistent.

Anything less is unsafe.

Steve C
November 14, 2008, 03:22 AM
Never had a dipper that would throw as much as the chart said it should. The weights listed for the dipper by Lee must be the absolute largest amount of powder that can be crammed into and heaped up on the dipper. It does make sense to list things this way but for reloading with a precise level of powder you need to scale what's being thrown from the dipper. Weigh several throws until you can get a consistent charge throw to throw. The scale will be accurate if zero'd to start with and there's no air blowing on it from a vent or fan.

The Bushmaster
November 14, 2008, 10:13 AM
Fireflyfather quote: "There's a certain amount of skill needed to use dippers safely."

Yup...There sure is...The best skill is knowing that you would be better of using a scale instead. I still have my Lee dipper set that I bought when I first got started. I used them for a month, bought a RCBS 5-0-5. Discovered just how inaccurate the dippers were. Now the dipper set plus box is used as a spacer in one of my die set drawers...

Walkalong
November 14, 2008, 10:52 AM
The dippers are handy when using a filler. Other than that, they are hit and miss. A scale gives you so much more control and peace of mind.

MMCSRET
November 14, 2008, 11:09 AM
Have both old and new dipper sets and use them regularly. Am currently loading a batch of 223 w/55 gr. Yellow dipper 1.6 throws exactly 24.8 gr. of AA2230, easily repeatable within .1 every time, makes loading soooooo easy. Love the dippers for almost 40 years, but, check yourself. the dippers don't change but the operator does.

1858rem
November 14, 2008, 11:32 AM
how much difference will level-ness of my bench make IF i have the scale perfectly zeroed already. it looks pretty level but i dunno about the floor (80+ yr old farmhouse)lol :D an i currently cant find my level:o

SASS#23149
November 14, 2008, 11:42 AM
zero is zero,regarless of how level the surface is that it sits on..within reason of course.

yep,them dippers AND the bushings for my loadAll always throw light.

1858rem
November 14, 2008, 11:48 AM
cool, just wanted to be sure cause' a whole grain+ off seemed ridicules to me! starting at min load what i thought was near max and working up still... well time to start over lol...... eh, mebby my groups will shrink a bit more now!

paperpuncher49
November 14, 2008, 12:31 PM
IMO, dippers are best used when weighing individual charges for rifle rounds. I typically choose a dipper that is lower than but close to my desired charge weight, dump it into the scale pan, and then use a trickler to bring it to the proper weight. Used in this manner, they at least get close to the desired charge.

rcmodel
November 14, 2008, 12:37 PM
Regardless of how unlevel your house or bench is:

You can easily make a scale platform out of a piece of 1 " x 4" white pine or oak.

Drill and tap it for three 1/4"x20 screws, two on one end, and one on the other. Attach the scale to it with tie-wraps.

Then level it to the work surface with the screws.

Unfortunately, you will have to find your level to do that!

243winxb
November 14, 2008, 01:47 PM
You can buy test weights to check your scale. I use 1 158gr jacketed bullet as my scale checker. When scale reads 0 at start, i then weight the bullet, it should always be exactly 158.7 gr. Then i know the scale is OK. I always put the scale on the same 4 legged stool in the same location. The area is marked with Magic Marker where the scale sits and the stool is located. No resetting to 0 evertime i use the scale.

dagger dog
November 14, 2008, 02:00 PM
I use the dippers to throw the charge into the scale pan only. The only dippers I throw directly into the case with are the ones I calibrate, or make with used brass.

As previously posted, dippers are designed to throw short to start with for safety.

The Bushmaster
November 14, 2008, 02:07 PM
243winxb. How do you know that bullet weighs 158.7 grains?? What did you weigh the bullet on? When was the reference scale calibrated last?

1858rem
November 14, 2008, 02:27 PM
the lightest bullet i would mind using as a check weight is a 124g.... max scale load is only 110g though, i could pull apart a .22 mag 40grn'er but they are $.25 each!:D:what:

NC-Mike
November 15, 2008, 12:51 PM
Well OK, I'm about to start reloading and I bought a set of lee dippers.

My plan was to find the dipper that throws the right charge using a scale and then use that dipper to throw the charges.

What are folks complaining about here? That the dippers do not throw the list weight or the dippers are not repeatable?

I would expect the dipper to be very repeatable but I'm thinking it would also be common sense to weigh the charge the particular dipper throws.

RugerBob
November 15, 2008, 01:48 PM
I was loading 8 grs Unique with my Lee beam scale. At the last shoot I was at (SASS) some of the other shooters thought my loads were a little hot, as I knocked a few targets down. So, I bought a digital scale. Turns out that 8 grains from my beam scale wieghed 7.7 on the digi scle. So, I checked my 30-30 loads. Beam scle said 33.5 (w-748). The digi said 32.5. Guess my loads weren't hot after all. Just my 2 cents. Bob

The Bushmaster
November 15, 2008, 02:52 PM
The dippers can have air pockets, pack a bit tighter from dip to dip or be a bit looser. Level to the top may vary even with your eyes from dip to dip. Or as you go along you may subconciously allow more doming of the powder in the dipper or start worring subconciously and short the powder in the dipper. A properly set up balance scale or electronic scale doesn't cheat. Or lie.

evan price
November 15, 2008, 02:55 PM
The dippers will throw light because the density of the powder changes with humidity and temperature. Lee calibrates them so worst case (most dense) you will not exceed maximum. Thus, most of the time, they are quite light.

My Lee scale is right on with the digital I checked it on.

buck460XVR
November 15, 2008, 05:44 PM
I use 1 158gr jacketed bullet as my scale checker.

243winxb. How do you know that bullet weighs 158.7 grains?? What did you weigh the bullet on? When was the reference scale calibrated last?



all new dimes weigh 35 grains. At $.10 it's the cheapest test weight you can find.

The Bushmaster
November 15, 2008, 06:23 PM
Hummm...I just weighed a group (10) of (new) dimes. They weighed from 33.8 gr to 35.7...

fireflyfather
November 16, 2008, 12:44 AM
OK, there's some BS being spewed here.

Dippers GENERALLY are as consistent as the person using them. However, even a mechanical powder measure can be shortstroked, or otherwise mishandled to produce an inconsistent load.

Dippers are meant to be used ALONG SIDE of a scale. If used consistently, the variance will be minimal, as long as you are using THE SAME BATCH OF POWDER. It's not so much moisture/temperature that affects the charge thrown by a dipper as it is different batches having a slightly different density (as anyone who uses a volumetric powder charging device should know). You have to test the dipper with each batch of powder, (just like VLD test for the Lee perfect powder measure, for example) but once you've established the density of that batch, any variation with the dippers is human error. Basically, if you are relying on what a dipper "should" throw, instead of what it does with your particular batch of powder, you are engaging in either fuzzy math, wishful thinking, or intellectual laziness. Instead, rely on the scientific method: Find out what it DOES throw, and then see how that can be useful to you (move up to next size and test that, use the dipper as is, trickle up from a dipper charge, etc...).

Yes, the charge that the dipper throws may be a little less than it says on the chart, but the mileage your car actually gets is just a little bit different than what the government rates the car as getting, isn't it? You'd be a DANGEROUS FOOL not to check the dippers against real powder before loading with them. Better that the dipper be a wee bit short than a wee bit high, given that powder density varies, and people's level of skill varies. I don't see what the problem is with that, since the need to hit an EXACT powder charge off of a set of dippers that vary by .3cc per size is at best unrealistic.

Yup...There sure is...The best skill is knowing that you would be better of using a scale instead. I still have my Lee dipper set that I bought when I first got started. I used them for a month, bought a RCBS 5-0-5. Discovered just how inaccurate the dippers were. Now the dipper set plus box is used as a spacer in one of my die set drawers...

A scale without dippers or other calibrated powder dispenser is almost as useless. What, are you going to use, a spoon? That's even slower and less accurate. If your complaint about accuracy is that the charges from the dipper didn't match the chart, then you misunderstand some of the basic principles of smokeless powder. See above.

Also, be aware that not everyone needs .1 grain precision for what they do. It's nice, but if your reloading goal is simply cheap plinking ammo, it will probably be served just as well with dippers as you would be with an expensive powder dispenser. It just depends on what you are trying to do. For truly accurate long range rifle ammo, you're going to be trickling anyway, so why not use a dipper to get you up into the right ball park off the bat?

1858rem
November 16, 2008, 01:35 AM
originally i started reloading pistol rounds with the lee classic loader... which ONLY provides a dipper. i wanted a fairly cheap setup to decide if i really wanted to start reloading...i wanted to use a variety of powders i had on hand and was suggested i ought to get the dipper set so i figured well whats a extra 7 bucks on top op the 300 dollar order i had to put in for my conversion plus the lee kit. i used the dippers for 300+ rounds without a hitch, then oddly enough i had what was an unusually loud round go off. i never bought any factor ammo so i dont know what they kick like or how they shoot accuracy wise, i was having terrible problems due to not knowing how to properly lube my cast bullets with lee liquid alox and didnt know if my barrel was clogged....

getting sidetracked, sorry... the .38 AND my .45 colt both had a single abnormally loud charge(what i thought was abnormal) i posted this thread to see if anyone else had used the dippers and threw too light a charge causing detonation. this didnt blow my gun or the .38, but i was concerned. now i know they throw so light i dont belive it was an overcharge, as the loads i WEIGHED out are even louder an hit harder:evil:(not max)

far as accuracy, using the 1.3cc dipper cut down a little since i thought it was supposed to throw 6+gr (actually threw ~4.5g) trailboss i got about 4-5" groups at under 17 yds, now using the scale and weighing each charge at 5.5gr i put ten shots into a 3"tall and 2" wide string, (not quite a circle lol:o) at 30+yds! darnit! now i completely lost my train of thought:uhoh:...

NC-Mike
November 16, 2008, 01:49 AM
fireflyfather

Dippers GENERALLY are as consistent as the person using them. However, even a mechanical powder measure can be shortstroked, or otherwise mishandled to produce an inconsistent load.

Dippers are meant to be used ALONG SIDE of a scale. If used consistently, the variance will be minimal, as long as you are using THE SAME BATCH OF POWDER.

That's what I'm talking about.

Tomorrow I will reload for the first time. I need to throw 5.7 gr of powder for some 9mm loads. I'll find the dipper that throws that weight or a little under by testing them on the scale... Once I find the dipper that throws the right charge, I'll record it in my dipper notes that x-dipper throws x-gr with x-powder.

Seems pretty simple. And I will throw about ten charges in the scale first to see how consistent it is but I imagine it will be close enough for plinking ammo.

1858rem
November 16, 2008, 02:00 AM
i didnt order/buy a scale yet cause i didnt know how far into this i was gonna get yet, but you may need to gradually cut a dipper down to throw the correct weight, it takes two .7cc dippers to throw 5.5g trailboss, and im debating on whether or not to cut down my 1.6cc dipper or save and see if i can use it for any .44mag/ 30-30 loads

dagger dog
November 16, 2008, 09:37 AM
1858,

Save your plastic dippers, and use an old case to make a dipper ,you can start it out too long then file it down to the volume you want, strip some copper wire out of some scrap Romex house wiring and twist up a little handle around the extractor groove.

If you are in the market for a scale do youself a favor and skip the Lee.
It's not that they are innacurate, they're are very slow to dampen, the beam oscilates way to long, and cuts down on your throw time. That is if you throw every charge on the scale. If you throw from a powder dispenser and check every 10th round or so it's not too bad.

After you get you're custom dipper made, you can speed up the process and still weigh every charge.

The Bushmaster
November 16, 2008, 11:20 AM
Get away from the dippers and buy a scale and a powder dispenser...Right...A spoon my butt.

1858rem...
The dippers will get you into trouble as you have already noted in your first post. I understand that money is tight, but a good balance scale or electronic (Sorry Walkalong) and a powder dispenser and maybe a trickler are still a good investment. Even if you have to save for a while.

jhansman
November 16, 2008, 12:33 PM
FWIW, I weighed 10 dips with a 1.6cc dipper I 'modified' to get 24gr. of H335 for my Saiga .223 loads. I won't list them all here, but the average weight was 24.1gr, with a max variance of .3gr. For that gun, I can live with this degree of accuracy. No brass or primer show any signs of pressure, and accuracy is (AK) good. BTW, for my Savage bolt gun loads, I zero the scale with each use and weigh every charge.

fireflyfather
November 16, 2008, 02:03 PM
The spoon bit was a bit of sarcasm, but it was really suggested to me by someone at one of the better gun/reloading shops out here (yech!).

As long as you use the dippers with a scale, it's not a problem. A powder dispenser without a scale is just as (if not more) dangerous. The key is to use them in combination.

And not every round needs to be trickled. I think that is a point some people are still missing. Just because that is what you need to do YOUR reloading to fit YOUR needs, doesn't mean that it's what every reloader needs. As for me, a baseline for SAFETY is a scale, plus some sort of ballpark measuring device (dipper, spoon, powder measure). For my reloading I use considerably more than that, but not everyone needs all that equipment. Some folks just want to reload a couple boxes a year (I probably load less than 20 boxes of ammo a year myself) of cheap plinking ammo. Some people want something they can slip into a bug out bag or keep in a hunting lodge and not worry too much about it. A dipper or two along with powder it's been calibrated with is perfect for that role.

lgbloader
November 16, 2008, 02:33 PM
a good balance scale or electronic (Sorry Walkalong) and a powder dispenser and maybe a trickler are still a good investment. Even if you have to save for a while.


This is great advice. I have 2 (both RCBS) tricklers and 3 mechanical scales (2 x RCBS 5-10's and 1 x RCBS 10-10) I have collected over the years (plus the electronic scale if I count my RCBS charge master combo) and I can't bring myself to part with any of them. I have dippers but I always use them in conjunction with a scale - ALWAYS.

LGB.

Friendly, Don't Fire!
November 16, 2008, 02:40 PM
I have a set of the Lee dippers and I use them solely for "throwing" the approximate charge onto the scale (preferably a bit on the LOW side), then topping off with the powder trickler. I always weigh each load, even when I throw them with my powder measure. I just throw a bit low and trickle up to the "zero line."

Even with my powder measure (which has the micrometer adjustment), I make notations that whatever powder is thrown at, say 251 on the micrometer powder measure which is just a bit shy of what I want the load to weigh in at, so I just trickle a few turns of the trickler up to ZERO on the scale!

I can see by the variance of how much powder is thrown each time by the dippers that there is quiete a difference between each charge "thrown" into the scale pan. I would never rely solely on those dippers!

fireflyfather
November 16, 2008, 08:03 PM
Inspector: Are you making cheap plinking ammo, hot loads near max charges, or precision match ammo? For the latter two, your method is probably best. For plinking ammo, that's an AWFULLY slow way to do things.

The Bushmaster
November 16, 2008, 10:00 PM
Fireflyfather...Who's in a hurry? I still have 34 more years on this planet. I am so anal and just plain not in any hurry that I weigh every powder charge...

Friendly, Don't Fire!
November 17, 2008, 06:20 PM
:)That's the way I make ALL my ammo, and the way I ALWAYS HAVE!

Like The Bushmaster says, what's the hurry? I enjoy reloading and weighing EACH CHARGE is just part of it, so I enjoy it! Maybe it's the same reason I use bench rest primers in my 500 Magnum. Hey, they're only a few more bucks a brick, why not?

I wouldn't have it any other way.:)

I CAN TELL YOU, though that using those dippers by themselves could be a recipe for disaster. I see how far they're off when I throw the powder in my scale pan! No wonder the OP says "lee dippers vs. lee safety scale, made an oddly loud BOOM!"

I don't relish hearing anything ODD when I push the "BANG BUTTON," thank you.

TEDDY
November 17, 2008, 08:55 PM
I have dippers, dont use them not because there is a problem but because I have several powder measures.but I do know about them,and they are made to throw low.as are the holes in the powder measures.You want maxim loads you use the scale.I dont like maxim loads.I like accurate loads and I get that with the powder measure.as for light loads blowing up BS.one or two powders have a warning,bullseye does not,but double charges do.I have been around longer than most of you and all the guns I have seen blow were from double charges.I have a security co.357 that blew the barrel in two.cylinder is fine.
barrel split.what happened? who knows. :rolleyes::uhoh:

fireflyfather
November 17, 2008, 10:46 PM
Please understand, I'm not in a hurry (if you are, you shouldn't be reloading). However, I understand that MY needs are not the same as every reloader. I'd be willing to bet that over half of reloaders don't weigh every charge. Probably a LOT more. It's not a standard practice outside of benchrest shooting or an anal-retentive personality (I fall into the latter category myself). I see no need to jump on people for using, or spread FUD about, dippers, so long as people understand that you have to use a scale to calibrate.

The number of instances of a too-low charge causing a kaboom is a non-zero number, but it's also an extremely small one. It's also only a problem with very slow burning powders in a large case. For someone who needs to load a couple hundred rounds of 38 special or .45 ACP for the weekend, and only has three or four hours, there isn't time to weigh each charge, nor is it necessary for safety, provided you aren't loading at max. If you really want speed, of course, a progressive is a necessity, but I'd like to hear about people's experiences blowing up a gun using a dipper to make plinking ammo. I can't imagine the dipper being the only factor in such a catastrophe (wrong powder, double charge, barrel obstruction, etc seem much more likely). I also can't see the load being so weak that a bullet fails to exit the barrel because of a small difference in charge weight. If you are downloading that much, you are out of the realm of novice/average reloading parameters. That's best done with a chronograph, several atypical load manuals, a scale with test weights, and VERY careful attention to making sure each bullet exits the barrel.

Short version: Can anyone here attribute a blown up gun or injury to dippers used with a scale? Nobody has to use them if they can't master the SIMPLE technique involved, or doesn't like them. For those that know how to use them safely, they're a useful tool.

The Bushmaster
November 17, 2008, 11:56 PM
But not accurate...;) At least not for me...:D

Friendly, Don't Fire!
November 18, 2008, 07:24 AM
But not accurate... At least not for me...

Me neither.

Also, one has to consider, if they are in a hurry to get so many rounds loaded in so many hours (or minutes), then that really goes against one of the basic rules of reloading---TO NOT BE IN A HURRY.
Reloading + being in a hurry may eventually lead to catastrophe (I said MAY).

robsc
November 18, 2008, 11:06 AM
I dropped my Lee safety scale and broke the beam. I bought a Hornady Pacific M scale. GET ONE!!!!! It`s heavier and all metal, easier to zero balance and set the desired powder weight. The numbers are bigger and SO much easier to read. Stronger damper meaning the beam doesn`t take forever to stop going up and down , up and down before stopping. Have the LEE scale bronzed and get Hornady M scale. Trust me you`ll be glad that you did. The M scale is worth every penny.

1858rem
November 18, 2008, 01:39 PM
i got a pic....the top "target" is 5.5g trailboss(two throws with the .7cc dipper) and a cast 255g rnfp at a bit over thirty yards, the bottom is 5.5 g of titegroup at same range same bullet too, need to work on that one a little more cause for the extra 150+fps of titegroup i think it could make a really nice load, went ahead and got 18oz of TB anyhow cause i found it cheap and it shoots so well alreadyhttp://i390.photobucket.com/albums/oo345/1858rem/100_0493.jpg

The Bushmaster
November 18, 2008, 02:07 PM
No one said that dippers wouldn't give good accurate loads. Just not accurate and consistent throws. When you are working at the low end or high end of the spectrum you want accurate powder charge weights. Dippers work O K at mid-range powder throws.

scrat
November 19, 2008, 11:15 PM
dippers are very very very accurate. If you use them correctly.

1st. lets look at how they were designed. Open a bottle of Unique measure out 10 grains of powder. Pour the powder in a shell and trim it down to where the powder is at the exact height. do a couple of test and your done. Problem is you just did a conversion from weight to volume. I use dippers for smokeless and black powder. i can tell you 30 grains of black powder measured in volume is exact as long as i give it a couple of taps to settle the powder and refill. However it will never measure to 30 grains weight. when we use dippers you may be off. shipments and manufacturing settling of the product humidity are all factors. This is why they should always be checked prior to using. then same time always give the dipper a tap to settle the powder to prevent air gaps. You must remember though.

If you use a dipper without a scale then you are basicly measuring by volume. Which means you accept the weight. Always make sure you give the dipper a tap never crown the dipper. meaning you have to have a flat surface not a raised or lowered surface. then make sure you use a scale. if you do not then you will be off slightly. depending on what your shooting it may not make that much off a difference. however as long as you are consistant on how you load with the dipper you will shoot very consistant loads.

The Bushmaster
November 19, 2008, 11:38 PM
They are sooo accurate, scrat, that if I didn't need the box they came in I would send them to you including the ones I made with cases, welding rod and solder. But I need the carton as a divider in one of my loading bench draws...I haven't used them in 18 years...

scrat
November 20, 2008, 12:59 AM
hahahahahaha ya but bushmaster you dont shoot blackpowder. i already have enough. 24 grains volume is 24 grains volume. Goex 3f to flask, flask to powder volumetric dipper then load.

scrat
November 20, 2008, 01:00 AM
one of these days im going to have to meet up with you to shoot black powder. even use them for loading up 45 colt black powder loads.

Friendly, Don't Fire!
November 20, 2008, 04:38 PM
I must admit, when I use it to throw a charge into my scale pan, I really am not taking pains to be sure that every scoopful is precisely the same.

Also, the only time I use them is when I'm working up various loads -- i.e., five shells of one load, five of another. Once I've settled on a load, I'll use my powder measure to throw the load into the scale pan.

I can see how, if I were to do what you say, scrat, it would surely make a difference.

The Bushmaster
November 20, 2008, 05:17 PM
Scrat...I have an adjustable brass measure for my .50 Hawken T/C...So bring it on...

scrat
November 21, 2008, 04:34 PM
hahahahha i have several brass adjustables as well. but the regular dippers i use when reloading black powder. its quicker as those adjustables are too skinny and are best used witha powder flask. .50 Hawken yep that would be fun. i got my .50cva

1858rem
November 21, 2008, 05:48 PM
i think i may have actually just loaded one of the shells up to normal.... cause i was throwing 1-2 whole grains light, depending on the powder, now i am using weighed out charges to go off... the boom is as loud if not louder than the odd one i experienced. i guess i was loading up gallery loads to start with lol. 4.5 g of trailboss, 6.5gr unique and i think 4gr of titegroup, i really dont remember but they were light. maybe i double dipped creating a denser loading in the dipper.

Friendly, Don't Fire!
November 21, 2008, 06:47 PM
i think i may have actually just loaded one of the shells up to normal.... cause i was throwing 1-2 whole grains light, depending on the powder, now i am using weighed out charges to go off... the boom is as loud if not louder than the odd one i experienced. i guess i was loading up gallery loads to start with lol. 4.5 g of trailboss, 6.5gr unique and i think 4gr of titegroup, i really dont remember but they were light. maybe i double dipped creating a denser loading in the dipper.
You aren't careful about recording your loads and what you loaded?:scrutiny:
I guess you could call that "being in a hurry."

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