Yugo M59...problems.


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Bentonville
November 27, 2008, 07:39 AM
Newly acquired Yugo M59


I bought an M59 at a gunshow in Raleigh this weekend. I paid too much (300)but the same motivation that hit thousands of other guys just like me drove me to do it.
I got the rifle home and cleaned it up. The trigger group is new. No wear on the hammer whatsoever. The bolt was clean as a whistle. The bore is very sharp.
Under the wood the metal was very rusted. I was disappointed but I cleaned it, soaked it with CLP and used 0000 steel wool on it. It doesn't look too bad now. There is also a small crack in the wood from the end under the bayonet for about two inches. I tried to glue and clamp it but because of the oil in the wood, nothing holds. Hopefull the first pin will prevent the crack from spreading.
I fired it today and it is accurate. The casing ejects about 10 feet front and slightly right. I don't know if this is normal. I cleaned the bolt with non-chlorinated break cleaner after taking it apart. I am used to ejected shells going side or back.
I have a question about the trigger. The trigger initially hits what seems like a rough bump and with more pressure will move to a smooth bit of distance until release. I oiled the moving parts. There is no gunk whatsoever on the trigger group. Is this bump something that is normal for the SKS or will it improve with use? Perhaps I need to send it to someone to smooth out? The heavy pull doesn't bother me. It's just the roughness and hard spot before the normal trigger feel.
Any comments or insights will be appreciated.

Update on my rifle. I picked up my spent casings today after taking my son out with me to shoot the Yugo. A very few of the Wolf Military Classic ammo had split casings from the neck down the side about an inch. Out of about thirty retrieved casings, only three of four were split about a half inch from the neck to the side. The Barnaul did not split on the ones I picked up. Is this normal or is it dangerous? I just now dropped off the rifle with a gunsmith who says he has a gauge to check the headspace. He examined the casings and said the headspace was probably ok because the base of the casings were not showing any irregularity. He said some individual casings in the batch could have a problem with thickness or brittleness due to faulty anealing but it was not dangerous. What are the thoughts of this forum? I posted on the SKS board but not many folks frequent there it seems. Thanks for the help.

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Odnar
November 27, 2008, 08:38 AM
Don't know the answer to all your questions, but my Yugo throws the brass far front too. Enjoy your new piece.

Evenflo76
November 27, 2008, 10:57 AM
My Yugo threw the brass at about 3 or 4 O'clock. The ejection is quite violent on these rifles. Even if done by hand. The brass would also be very beat up.

As far as the trigger goes, they are all pretty sloppy. Mine reminded me of my Glock triggers. There was a bunch of creep and then a slap after the round was fired. I just got used to it. :banghead:

Apparently there is a shop somewhere in the northeast that can rebuild the trigger. I don't remeber the name or location. My thinking was that I was not going to spend $100 to fix a small problem on a $200 rifle.


Good info here: http://www.sksboards.com/smf/index.php

TEDDY
November 27, 2008, 12:48 PM
the ammo is the problem but only as far as splitting this is strain on neck.just shoot ammo that does not split.
I paid $150 for one sks and thought it was high,$79 for my other two.each.
my m15 cost $100,parts gun.my M1garand under $200.thats yrs ago.

nathan
November 27, 2008, 02:25 PM
SKSs are liek that. Its a military grade rifle. Some nice and most arent. My Russ SKS has a very hard trigger but it smooths as time goes . Meaning shooting lots of ammo.

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