Best Way To Store HD Shotgun?


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fiddleharp
December 1, 2008, 11:18 AM
It would seem since this would be your go-to home defense weapon, it should be standing by, ready to fight at a moment's notice.
Seeing as how it might be years before any home invasion emergency occurs, if ever, does it hurt the hammer and magazine springs to be stored cocked and loaded for great lengths of time?
I live by myself and am never visited by children, teenagers, no cats or dogs, or overnight houseguests. I have a handful of friends who stop by for tea once in a blue moon, but the odds of them going into my bedroom and accidently discharging my shotgun are nil.
The way I live, I could safely get away with storing my pump shotgun with a round in the chamber and the safety catch off.
The question is, should I? How do you keep your HD shotgun ready?

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Browning
December 1, 2008, 11:44 AM
The way I live, I could safely get away with storing my pump shotgun with a round in the chamber and the safety catch off.

I keep four round in the tube (six + 1 total capacity/I'd rather load it down a little so it doesn't develop a set and so that it functions when and if I need it too) and a round in the chamber, but for safety sake though keep the safety catch on.

I'm getting the impression that no one lives with you and that there aren't any pets so there's not much chance of it being disturbed, but it could still fall on the butt end or get knocked over and discharge accidentally that way. If you're used to shooting it quite a bit, you're going to flick the safety catch as part of the shouldering process as you prepare to fire.

So really it's part of the training and familiarization process than anything.

waterhouse
December 1, 2008, 11:58 AM
I go with cruiser ready, since that is what I'm used to. There may be better ways, but that is the best way for me.

I make sure the chamber is empty. Then I check it again to make sure the chamber is empty.

Safety off, point in a safe direction, pull the trigger.

Then I load the magazine tube.

For a pump, this means I can grab the gun, pump it, and use it. On the semi I have to slap the bolt backwards. I can toss either in the trunk with no worries about the firing pin bouncing around.

I understand I'm giving up a round and making noise to load the gun, but I'm happy with the compromise. In the past, I've seen cruiser ready variations including putting the safety back on, and some that don't pull the trigger and use the action bar release button. I described it the way I was taught.

fiddleharp
December 1, 2008, 12:00 PM
I figured that safety catch remark would get some notice. I guess I said that to illustrate the point that that gun won't get touched unless I touch it.
Okay, I'll leave the safety on, but what about the hammer spring? If the weapon is cocked for years, will that hurt anything?
At least with handguns and lever rifles you can lower the hammer until you need to cock it again.

jpatterson
December 1, 2008, 12:04 PM
I used to have a full tube, chamber empty and against the wall under the covers next to me while I slept.

DAVIDSDIVAD
December 1, 2008, 12:16 PM
Same as Jpatterson.

Only live with my 25 year old brother, and he's aware of it.

When I'm gone it's stays out of sight.

Friendly, Don't Fire!
December 1, 2008, 12:21 PM
Seeing as how it might be years before any home invasion emergency occurs, if ever, does it hurt the hammer and magazine springs to be stored cocked and loaded for great lengths of time?

I think tests and many people who have kept a gun loaded for years have all concluded that there would be virtually no wear on a spring if kept in the cocked position. The same holds true with magazines that are filled (to capacity) with ammo. The springs do not wear out. I think springs wear out from constant use (constantly cocking and firing, or constanly loading and unloading magazines). Gun springs are apparently not like car springs which, over time wear, causing the car to sit lower.

Keep it cocked, loaded, whatever is best for you, and sleep tight knowing you are not damaging your weapon. More importantly than spring wear is the question "is the gun the way you need it to be to be both safe and ready on a moment's notice to fire, if necessary?"

Browning
December 1, 2008, 01:04 PM
Okay, I'll leave the safety on, but what about the hammer spring? If the weapon is cocked for years, will that hurt anything?

I doubt it, I've left it that way for years and I shoot it about once a month and I've never had a problem.

If you're worried about it, just replace it every couple of years or replace it with a factory spring if it's a Mossberg or a Wolff spring if it's a Rem 870. I don't think that it's gonna really do that much harm.

Wolff Springs For Remington 870 (http://www.gunsprings.com/RifleShotgun/Remington_RsNF.html#Rem%20740)

Mossberg Hammer Spring (http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=842553)

wnycollector
December 1, 2008, 03:44 PM
Cruiser ready here,

76shuvlinoff
December 1, 2008, 08:26 PM
and here

dispatch55126
December 1, 2008, 08:41 PM
Kids in the house.

Mines in the safe unloaded with 5 TAP 00 buck shells sitting next to it, safety off.

rem870hunter
December 1, 2008, 09:05 PM
empty chamber,hammer down 4 buckshot in the tube,5 more on the buttcuff. leaning up against the wall right nest to my dresser. box of sluggers on the nightstand next to a flashlight. if i'm not home its in the cabinet,i have the only keys to it.

kiawahman
December 1, 2008, 09:23 PM
The sound of chambering a round with a pump shotgun is universal, and may be all that's needed to force an intruder to make a hasty exit.

Elbeeo
December 1, 2008, 09:33 PM
I keep my 870 full, safety on.

I don't want to give away the fact that I've got a shotgun in a situation that I need to use it. Sure, it might get rid of the majority of guys breaking in, but for the one who doesn't leave, I've given away my position and given him cause to be more cautious than he would have previously been.

monkyboy1975
December 1, 2008, 10:23 PM
criuser ready, 4 in the mag with chamber empty.

Anon
December 1, 2008, 10:39 PM
http://www.geekologie.com/2007/10/12/bed-shotgun-rack.jpg

http://www.the-backup.com/
















No, I'm not serious.

kiawahman
December 2, 2008, 01:26 PM
I don't want to give away the fact that I've got a shotgun in a situation that I need to use it. Sure, it might get rid of the majority of guys breaking in, but for the one who doesn't leave, I've given away my position and given him cause to be more cautious than he would have previously been.

Many of us have our SOP, but for those who might be still in the process of forming their own, please consider the following;

Unless I know for positive sure that an intruder has come to kill, (i.e. the Terminator), I'm giving them one chance to save their sorry ass for picking my home to burglarize, and hopefully I won't have a big mess to clean up later.
A large percentage of home invasions (burglaries) are committed by young males in their late teens and early twenties, many of whom are unarmed. They're making a stupid mistake, sure, but they may not be deserving of a death sentence. I'll bet most of us here can relate to an incident in our own lives, when we were in our late teens or early 20's, that if things had gone down just a little differently the outcome could have been needlessly tragic.
Racking a pump shotgun, turning on a light, shouting, tossing something heavy, a blast from a boat horn, or firing a warning shot into the ceiling (a much smaller mess to clean up), preferably before your exact whereabouts are known by the intruder, could diffuse the situation and save yourself from the sickening feeling that maybe you snuffed out a life that didn't need to be. Most common thieves aren't expecting someone to be home when they enter the house, just pulling the string on your daughter's talking doll might be more than enough to send them streaking down the street.
The devil will always be in the details surrounding each individual situation, nobody can plan for every possibility, but you need to come to grips with how fast and how far you're willing to go when using deadly force ahead of time as it is literally a matter of life and death.

withdrawn34
December 2, 2008, 04:50 PM
Yes, I understand that, but don't forget that violent criminals didn't always start out that way.

When someone comes into your home, time is extremely short, and stress is extremely high. No offense, but you really can't imagine what I'm talking about unless you've been through it before.

1) You have NO way of knowing if he is armed without challenging him, or physically seeing him at close range with sufficient illumination - not a tactically sound maneuver, and a good way to get yourself killed by anyone who is not a complete amateur at home burglaries/invasions and/or someone who just got out of the big house and sure as hell isn't going back.
2) There's a good chance that if you let him go, he'll just come back some other time, or bring an "experienced" friend with him next time to clean up YOUR ass.

Be careful out there. Don't be a vigilante, but protect your own. There's a reason SWAT can say "drop your weapon!" first - they usually have multiple men with superior tactics and weaponry, as well as somewhat decreased legal consequences for mistakes. A homeowner crawling around in the dark with a single weapon and neighbors and family members as well as a higher standard of consequences to worry about can't go one-man-SWAT style. You MUST protect your life!

shotgunjoel
December 3, 2008, 11:55 PM
There isn't anything safe about storing a gun with one in the chamber and the safety off, not that you should trust a safety. So therefore keep the mag full, the safety off if you want and shuck a shell in if you want. That sound will likely be all you need to clear your house.

jakemccoy
December 4, 2008, 01:29 AM
Here's my configuration while sleeping:

hammer down, empty chamber, magazine full, safety on, muzzle down, propped up in corner next to my bed

When I'm awake, I store my shotgun in a safe and carry a handgun. It's a good habit to keep loaded guns in my immediate control, even if I lived in the boonies with no pets and hardly any visitors. It just takes that one in a million chance to change my life for the worse forever. If an accident happens with your loaded gun while your nowhere around, it's your fault.

franconialocal
December 4, 2008, 02:06 AM
One in the chamber, safety off, propped up on some saw horses facing the door with a string around the trigger to an eye bolt on the cealing next to the door, ultimately tied to the door handle............c'mon......did anyone fall for it???:neener:

OK, JUST KIDDING....cruiser ready like many others.

CZguy
December 4, 2008, 05:47 AM
Okay, I'll leave the safety on, but what about the hammer spring? If the weapon is cocked for years, will that hurt anything?

Springs wear out from two things, being cycled and over-compressed.

Leaving a spring compressed for years, will not hurt it.

I give my Cruiser ready 870 an semi annual ops check.

bikerdoc
December 4, 2008, 07:10 AM
Before we get to shotgun storage lets talk about my layered defense.
Locked doors and windows
Alarms
Dogs
all of which might give early warning.
As for the shotgun, full mag safety off in the corner beside the bed. - the sound of a round being jacked into the chamber gives the intruder the message im ready to rock and roll, meanwhile the wife is dialing 911, and setting up an interlocking field of fire from her side of the room. with a 38.
for other rooms there are different plans.

Vinny
December 4, 2008, 07:39 AM
I would like a clarification. I apologize if my question hijacks the thread but it may pertain to the question asked.

In addition to how you keep your shotgun loaded, where do you keep it? Next to the nightstand when you sleep? Do you unload it and store it away every time you head off to work or out with friends and family? Do you keep it in an easily accessible place with a simple cable lock through it?

I'm only asking because I have thought about purchasing a shotgun but I'm not quite sure where I want to store it and in what condition. I want to avoid coming home and getting shot by a burglar using my shotgun.

Wouldn't it be better to store your shotgun and use your handgun as the primary defender until you can get to the shotgun or only keep your shotgun easily available during very bad times?

Handguns seem easier to store but that's probably just my own mental hangup.

CZguy
December 4, 2008, 11:22 AM
Handguns seem easier to store but that's probably just my own mental hangup.

Handguns are easier to store, but much more difficult to employ in a real life defense situation. By that I mean, a great deal more training and practice than most of us have time to do. A shotgun still requires training, but is much more controllable under stress.

Also a center of mass hit with a 12 ga is pretty much a fight stopper.

MaterDei
December 4, 2008, 11:37 AM
I store mine in a Loc Box.

http://thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=8922&d=1073046630

foghornl
December 4, 2008, 11:38 AM
"Cruiser Ready"

ChCx2744
December 4, 2008, 11:08 PM
Cruiser Ready..Pump loose, tube mag full, empty chamber, saftey off

karz10
December 7, 2008, 02:57 AM
For those that want to lock up in quick access box:

http://www.purchase.thesafeoutlet.com/ see riflelocker

http://www.vlineind.com/html/closet_vault.html

The rifle locker has 1/2" bolts and mounts between studs, has a tube key override, an electronic keypad w/ tamper and low batt notifier, a charger, and you can configure shelves and holsters on the door...

The V-line has latching simplex lock, so there's like one thick bolt right where the buttons are, or two additional locking points for longer term storage w/ a key. So, no battery to mess with, but not a uniform bolt patter like the rifleocker, and I think less thick door. Still configurable w/ accessories, but I think by the time you add the door panel and stuff the price difference is minimal.

Unlike the OP, I have kids in the house, and even if I didn't I would still want to lock up the gun to try to keep it off the street, but still have quick access to it as soon as I came home.

I have quicker access to a handgun on my hip, or by my bed in another lock box, but I wanted a way to keep a couple long guns at the ready. I was saving for one of these when I ran across a local guy selling one he never installed. I bought the riflelocker at a decent discount this way. Just got it actually, about to mount it, but I've tested it out so far, all is well.

I figure I could keep the 12 ga pump in there w/ a bandolier or something, a rifle, and a backup handgun for me, and one for the mrs.

I want to keep other things in a bigger safe/rsc, once I have those things, but figured this was the prudent thing to do first for quick access stuff, since where I want to put the safe will be more secured and take longer to get into.

Karz

kwelz
December 7, 2008, 03:40 AM
I keep four round in the tube (six + 1 total capacity/I'd rather load it down a little so it doesn't develop a set and so that it functions when and if I need it too) and a round in the chamber, but for safety sake though keep the safety catch on.

You realize this has been beaten to death right and springs do not develop a "Set"

Bryan_Willman
December 7, 2008, 11:28 PM
Having done an experiment with dummys in which I found fully loaded and chambered with safety on was the fastest to deploy for me, that's how I store the HD gun. (6+1) [This might change if more practice proves unchambered is as fast, since no round in chamber means no drop risk, no discharge risk in a fire, etc.]

It's in a safe near the bed with a very rapid electronic lock - plan is to win the footrace to the safe. Things like alarms, etc. will be added to make sure of that.

I also practice removing the gun in a fashion where I won't drop it, and if I do drop it, the muzzle won't be pointed at me.

Safety off is very fast on an 870, so safety stays on.

Big Daddy Grim
December 8, 2008, 08:58 PM
I got an old Double barrel with two in the barrels more on the stock I leave it in an old saddle case hanging on my wall its ready when I need it. It doesn't even have a safety.

shevrock
December 8, 2008, 09:30 PM
I have some homemade wooden shelves covering the entire wall in my room. on top is my shotgun. 5 in tube. slide open. one nearby. safety on. if needed put in a shell, then undo the safety. my shotgun's 6+1 BTW

modifiedbrowning
December 8, 2008, 10:29 PM
One in the chamber,mag full, safety on behind bedroom door (Winchester 1300 Defender).
No kids, two cats.

HB
December 8, 2008, 11:03 PM
For my sarcastic remark of the day, How about in your hands?

In all seriousness, why would somebody keep a shotgun loaded against the wall! The chances are just too great that it could slip. If the guy is close enough that I don't have time to rack the pump, I'm dead anyway. A mag full and an empty chamber makes the most sense to me at least.

In my experience, most break-ins are 1. crackheads looking to scrape up a few bucks to get high or 2. An opportunistic punk who sees something he likes. While these folks shouldn't be in my house, the best course of action is probably not to sneak around a dark house trying to surprise the guy and shoot him in my living room (lest I have to clean up). A simple "Hey (insert explitive of choice), you ready to die" or "the police are coming" will get these people out of the house/yard. If the guy is there to kill you, you'll know by the door being kick in and a fast entry. There is always the robbery gone bad scenario, so you should treat a break-in as such and hole up if you don't have loved ones in danger. Let's also remember that most break-ins are during the workday.

Or as I once heard a comedian say of his HD plan, "I'm too stupid to own a gun. If somebody ever breaks into my house, I'll just act like I'm breaking in too. When he asks what I'm looking to steal, all I say is 'I can't wait for this guy to get home, then I'll get my rape on'. That oughta scare him away, or I'll hit him with a baby, what kind of sicko hits somebody with a baby".

PS, do you all leave your shotguns sitting out during the day? This could lead to a nasty surprise if you get home and a varmint happened to get home before you :eek:

I just reread this and I sound like a 14 year old mall ninja, perfect

HB

lotus
December 9, 2008, 03:44 PM
Cruiser ready with 5 in the tube (8-rnd extension). It's in my safe so if 5 rnds of 12 guage isn't enough there are other options close at hand.

Odd1
December 9, 2008, 06:00 PM
Crusier ready here.
Mag tube full (5 rds).
Safety off.

To me it just seems the most natural.

I will admit every few months, unload , functions check, and reload.

Ringtail
December 9, 2008, 09:59 PM
Magizine loaded chamber empty. The thought of shotgun chamber loaded with the safety off gives me the creeps.

To each their own , but I don't see any real advantage to keeping a shotgun chambered loaded. I do see a real disadvantage to keeping the chamber loaded and relying on the safety - its dangerous. Safe gun handling requires you to excercise muzzle control at all times. It the gun is not in your hands then it had better be unloaded ( at least the chamber ) because it is out of your control.

I realize many will not see it this way, but to me, keeping a shotgun stored in the house chamber loaded is an unnecessarily dangerous practice.

einvasion
November 30, 2009, 11:15 PM
I have The Home Back-Up shotgun mount and love it.. it's durable and it doesn't require any screws/bolts and my gun doesn't get scratched/dinged up.. If you are looking for a shotgun mount for your bed must see.... http://www.the-backup.com

RevolvingGarbage
December 1, 2009, 12:19 AM
I keep my Pardner Pump with 5 rounds of 00 in the tube, chamber empty safety off.

Making the gun ready by just pumping it is the most simple and safe method of storage for me. If the other members of my family ever need to use the gun, they wont have to fiddle with safety or action release to know if its ready to go. Just pick it up, pump, and aim.

natman
December 1, 2009, 03:21 AM
Yes, I understand that, but don't forget that violent criminals didn't always start out that way.

When someone comes into your home, time is extremely short, and stress is extremely high. No offense, but you really can't imagine what I'm talking about unless you've been through it before.

1) You have NO way of knowing if he is armed without challenging him, or physically seeing him at close range with sufficient illumination - not a tactically sound maneuver, and a good way to get yourself killed by anyone who is not a complete amateur at home burglaries/invasions and/or someone who just got out of the big house and sure as hell isn't going back.
2) There's a good chance that if you let him go, he'll just come back some other time, or bring an "experienced" friend with him next time to clean up YOUR ass.

Be careful out there. Don't be a vigilante, but protect your own. There's a reason SWAT can say "drop your weapon!" first - they usually have multiple men with superior tactics and weaponry, as well as somewhat decreased legal consequences for mistakes. A homeowner crawling around in the dark with a single weapon and neighbors and family members as well as a higher standard of consequences to worry about can't go one-man-SWAT style. You MUST protect your life!

So what do you intend to do? Just shoot as soon as you get a clear shot? Without confirming if the dim outline you see in the dark is armed, or your neighbor who came home from the bar and walked in the wrong house?

fiddleharp
December 1, 2009, 08:46 PM
How 'bout that? Somebody resurrected this old thread. I finally ended up building one of those "hang your shotgun on your bed" contraptions.
I also pulled the trigger on a chambered snap cap and loaded the tube with four #1 bucks, safety catch off.
There, in case of trouble, just shuck out the snap cap, chamber a live round, and it's off to the party!

76shuvlinoff
December 1, 2009, 08:51 PM
870 Full tube slug followed by 00 cruiser ready two steps from bed.
Same for Marlin 1894c with hornady leverevolution
1911 near my pillow, full mag empty chamber.
.357 Blackhawk very near 1911. loaded, hey it's single action.

on reserve elsewhere... single shot legal short barreled 12 gauge....00 and good to go.

All I need are the damn dogs to do their job! :eek:

03Shadowbob
December 1, 2009, 08:54 PM
I have heard of people using big hooks from Lowes or HD and attaching them to the inside wall of their closet above the door. Keep one in the chamber and safety on. Racking one home to scare a BG is amateur. ;)

Gary A
December 1, 2009, 10:48 PM
Racking one home to scare a BG is amateur

I've always figured that "racking one home" is done to chamber a round, not to scare anyone. Since I keep my HD shotgun chamber empty, chambering a round is essential should I have need of the shotgun. Kindofa no brainer.

einvasion
December 2, 2009, 09:14 PM
http://www.geekologie.com/2007/10/12/bed-shotgun-rack.jpg

http://www.the-backup.com/
















No, I'm not serious.
You laugh but that mount works -- not a scratch on the gun.
40 bones too and they ship it to you. http://www.home-backup-protection.com/index.html

Sir Aardvark
December 3, 2009, 12:25 AM
Rem 870 -

chamber empty
action open
safety on
3 shells of buckshot in magazine (no extension)

I prefer having room in the magazine for 1 more shell so that I can quickly transition from buckshot to a slug if necessary (also available is the less desirable option of doing a "combat reload" through the ejection port). If you have your shotgun completely full of buckshot -ie: magazine full and 1 in the chamber - then you are limiting your options if you suddenly find that you need to load a slug in a hurry.

I do not really worry about "spring set" with full magazines, but I am wary of "mushrooming" of the shotshells from being under pressure for extended periods of time. "Mushroomed" shotshells can cause feeding difficulties because they can possibly wedge themselves against the magazine wall. I make sure that I rotate out my shotshells about every 7 months, or so, just to make things as foolproof as possible.

AcceptableUserName
December 3, 2009, 12:36 AM
I prefer cruiser ready. action closed, no rd chambered, safety off. If even 4-5 rds won't do the trick, nothing will. It would probably look better from a legal standpoint if you didn't have a fully decked out, chambered, cocked and locked gun, as well. I usually kept my pgo wingmaster with choate extension stocked with 4 in the tube, cruiser ready. (gun was 6+1 capable).

The m500 I'm building I plan to keep 5 ready, next to my bed against the wall. I do not live with small children and if I did I'd probably opt for a pistol instead as it's easier to "hide".



For anyone cruising this thread for recommendations, BAD IDEA. Gun safety is learned by repetition. I don't want someone thinking "cruiser ready" is a good idea when theyre not in that mindset and blowing a chunk out of your tv - or worse. Do what works for you and always assume that sucker's loaded.

Tacbandit
December 3, 2009, 01:38 AM
Cruiser ready, for sure.
kiawahman...I hear what your saying about not wanting to shoot someone who doesn't need to be shot...However, you can't make that determination in time to insure your safety, if they're the truly evil type. Racking a slide just to scare someone isn't wisdom...And I'm not pulling the string on a talking doll to scare someone either...If they're in my house in this day and time we live in...hey...it probably ain't the Avon lady making a "late" delivery...Locks, alarms, rottweillers...I've given them enough opportunity to change their mind if they're wanting to do right...No one ever wants to have to
shoot in self defense, or at all...But hey...that's why it's called "self defense".

rmfnla
December 3, 2009, 11:18 AM
[QUOTE=CZguy;5126608]Springs wear out from two things, being cycled and over-compressed.

Leaving a spring compressed for years, will not hurt it.QUOTE]


Exactly.

AcceptableUserName
December 3, 2009, 11:25 AM
wolff springs are like 8 bucks apiece.

Nefarious79
December 4, 2009, 05:00 PM
590

8rds of 00 in the mag
Action Open
Empty chamber
Safety on

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