CCW Law says gun must be "... of .45 caliber or smaller"


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Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
December 1, 2008, 08:09 PM
So is a .454 Casull of ".45 caliber or smaller"? Anyone know of any case law addressing this? Does the written designation control, or the actual bullet diameter control?

The gov't could make the argument that the written designation controls, which allows ".45 acp", but not ".454 casull", because if the actual bullet diameter controls, then .45 acp would be out (since it's .451 or .452, not .450), and the legislature could NOT possibly have meant to rule out a "standard" defense cartridge such as .45 acp, and so IT must be ok, due to the actual designation.

On the other hand, you could argue that it's the diameter that controls, but that BOTH .45 acp AND .45 colt or .454 casull are fine, since they both use the SAME bullets, and the legislature couldn't have intended to exclude the .45 acp. Anything .459 or smaller is basically ".45 caliber" and it has to be .460 or larger to be not ".45 or smaller", would be the argument.

So that cuts both ways, creating a catch 22 circular logic (the fact that the legislature couldn't possibly have intended to exclude the .45 acp equally supports both extensions of logic, one of which concludes that a ".454 round" is illegal and one of which concludes that a ".454 round" is fine and dandy.)

Carrying a .45-70 creates even more confusion, becuase it's NOT a .451/452 bullet (it's .458), but yet it IS a ".45 cal" designation. So is it illegal being .458 (not ".45 cal or smaller"), or if the designation controls, then it's fine. That would be extremely weird if the courts concluded that the designation controls, because then .45-70 WOULD be allowed (BFR anyone?), yet .454 casull would NOT be allowed.

Do you think the cops would charge you in YOUR state if you carried a .454 casull? See, these things keep me up at night.... :p

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Sinixstar
December 1, 2008, 08:12 PM
the .45 gap, .45 acp, .45 LC, .454 casull, and I believe the .460 - are all in fact .454 inches in diamter. (.45 caliber).
The difference being that the casings are of different shape/length.

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
December 1, 2008, 08:16 PM
.45 colt is clearly just in the same boat as .45 acp - it's a .45 cal designation AND it uses the same .452 bullet (unlike .45-70). So .45 colt is clearly legal anywhere that .45 acp is. It's just really hard to figure out whether the cops would try to claim that .454 is illegal or not. In my state, I would bet that they would NOT try to claim it's illegal, and arrest/revoke, but you never know, depending on the cop and the DA/County involved. .460 presents its own problem too, because it's not even .459 or less in designation, yet it too uses the same .452 diameter bullets.

Eightball
December 1, 2008, 08:21 PM
CCW Law says gun must be "... of .45 caliber or smaller"Where is this, exactly?

Blacksmoke
December 1, 2008, 08:47 PM
You can assume they meant .45-0000.

You could stretch a point and start packing a .455 Eley and see what they say...

General Geoff
December 1, 2008, 08:56 PM
Chances are likely that such a law could be struck down as arbitrary, especially with the recent Heller ruling, due to .45ACP being larger than .4500 diameter, and it being one of the most popular handgun cartridges in the country.

Frog48
December 1, 2008, 09:03 PM
Where is this, exactly?

+1

What state is this law from? Seems pretty ridiculous.

Prince Yamato
December 2, 2008, 02:47 AM
The law is basically saying, "Don't carry a Desert Eagle". There.

John Wayne
December 2, 2008, 02:59 AM
I doubt they're carrying calipers. If something was 4 thousands of an inch over the limit, I'd claim it was an out of spec round or due to sloppy manufacturing tolernaces.

BHP FAN
December 2, 2008, 03:11 AM
I'm still wondering just how I'd go about concealing my .45 -70 [.458] Trapdoor in the first place...

7.62X25mm
December 2, 2008, 03:24 AM
what state is staying this?

Does anyone read english?

This question has been asked now four times.

dmazur
December 2, 2008, 04:04 AM
Well, I didn't do an exhaustive search, but I found Oklahoma apparently thought it necessary to try to restrict caliber -

TITLE 21 1290.6. Prohibited ammunition
PROHIBITED AMMUNITION
Any concealed handgun when carried in a manner authorized by the
provisions of the Oklahoma Self-Defense Act, Sections 1 through 26 of this act,
when loaded with any ammunition which is either a restricted bullet as defined
by Section 1289.19 of Title 21 of the Oklahoma Statutes or is larger than .45
caliber or is otherwise prohibited by law shall be deemed a prohibited weapon
for purposes of the Oklahoma Self-Defense Act. Any person violating the
provisions of this section shall be punished for a criminal offense as provided by
Section 1272 of title 21 of the Oklahoma Statutes or any other applicable
provision of law. In addition to any criminal prosecution for a violation of the
provisions of this section, the licensee shall be subject to an administrative fine
of Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00), upon a hearing and determination by the
Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation that the person is in violation of the
provisions of this section.

There wasn't any "nitpicky" definition of what exactly is meant by .45 caliber, so I imagine Oklahoma is trying to figure that out now. Maybe someone's been charged with violating this law?

An aside: Why on earth is it necessary to limit caliber? There is an interesting 1911 variation that fires something called the .50GI, if I'm remembering correctly. Not legal in Oklahoma, I'd bet.

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
December 2, 2008, 09:03 AM
Just got back (busy) - yep, Okla.

TexasRifleman
December 2, 2008, 09:05 AM
Yep, pretty much sounds like the "Oklahoma Desert Eagle Limitation Treaty" or something.

Very odd.

Matt-J2
December 2, 2008, 09:54 AM
Of course, one could still carry the Desert Eagle in .44mag, if they wanted.

BBQLS1
December 2, 2008, 10:10 AM
LOL, I can't imagine CCW .454 Casull!

ConstitutionCowboy
December 2, 2008, 10:25 AM
Speaking of how they wrote the law, they only wrote in 2 digits. What ever the diameter of the bullet is out BEYOND those two digits is not covered by the law, and therefore, not prohibited by the law.

21-1290.6. Prohibited ammunition.

PROHIBITED AMMUNITION

Any concealed handgun when carried in a manner authorized by the provisions of the Oklahoma Self-Defense Act, Sections 1 through 25 of this act, when loaded with any ammunition which is either a restricted bullet as defined by Section 1289.19 of Title 21 of the Oklahoma Statutes or is larger than .45 caliber or is otherwise prohibited by law shall be deemed a prohibited weapon for purposes of the Oklahoma Self-Defense Act. Any person violating the provisions of this section shall be punished for a criminal offense as provided by Section 1272 of Title 21 of the Oklahoma Statutes or any other applicable provision of law. In addition to any criminal prosecution for a violation of the provisions of this section, the licensee shall be subject to an administrative fine of Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00), upon a hearing and determination by the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation that the person is in violation of the provisions of this section.
Added by Laws 1995, c. 272, 6, eff. Sept. 1, 1995.

If it uses .46 caliber or larger, it's a firearm prohibited for Concealed Carry.

Woody

Highland Ranger
December 2, 2008, 10:40 AM
I don't like it, but I have to think that is a nod at defining what is reasonable to be concealed.

Let's face it, the DE's, or S&W X, or the big Rugers are not practical weapons to conceal unless you are 7 feet tall and 500 pounds.

Is open carry legal there?

Can anyone offer insight as to what happened and the reasoning behind the law?

Maelstrom
December 2, 2008, 10:45 AM
Nice try, but .45 is actually just .4500000000000000000000 truncated to two places. I would say, technically, the .45 ACP is banned.

ConstitutionCowboy
December 2, 2008, 10:52 AM
Nice try, but .45 is actually just .4500000000000000000000 truncated to two places. I would say, technically, the .45 ACP is banned.

Yeah, but we're not talking math here. We're talking law.

Woody

General Geoff
December 2, 2008, 11:13 AM
Why don't we just email or call the Oklahoma Attorney General's office and ask them? Ask if it's a question of popular nomenclature/designation (.45ACP) or actual bullet diameter (0.452", thus banned).

Art Eatman
December 2, 2008, 12:43 PM
An overzealous DA might try to persuade a jury to disregard common usage and agree with nitpicking about exact dimensions. Odds are that nominal dimensions and common usage would prevail

And, I'd imagine that many CHL folks and LEOs in Oklahoma are carrying some variety of forty-five-caliber handgun.

Which segues into a vision of this overzealous DA ordering the arrest of toters of oversized handguns: "But sir, our entire department carries those!"

ConstitutionCowboy
December 2, 2008, 01:01 PM
I'm not among them, Art. I don't carry one. I carry two.

Woody

Izaak Walton
December 2, 2008, 01:41 PM
Quote:
Nice try, but .45 is actually just .4500000000000000000000 truncated to two places. I would say, technically, the .45 ACP is banned.
Yeah, but we're not talking math here. We're talking law.

Woody

Ain't that the truth.
Math in most cases makes sense.

KBintheSLC
December 2, 2008, 01:48 PM
LOL, I can't imagine CCW .454 Casull!

This is the part I don't get. Why would you want to carry something like a 454 or a 460 around town? Do you have lots of angry wildebeest roaming the streets? Those are big game hunting, and wilderness defense loads. I would no sooner carry those around town than I would carry around a Thomson Contender in .308
If you can't feel safe carrying something that is 45 cal or smaller, then you likely live in a war zone and should consider slinging your AK over your shoulder. If thats not the case and you just live out in the backwoods, you can just open carry that beastly revolver. I can't imagine finding room in my pants for 50 oz of steel.

Thin Black Line
December 2, 2008, 02:05 PM
An overzealous DA might try to persuade a jury to disregard common usage and agree with nitpicking about exact dimensions.

+1. Does anyone here want to be the test case?

BTW, I actually read a transcript where attorneys tried to trip up someone
on the difference between "caliber" and "millimeter" --it was done on purpose.
Trust me, someone will break out calipers in court if it comes down to it to
win their case and assure a good track record.

Do NOT ever think for a second that attorneys are stupid, they are paid to
be strategically devious and the good ones are paid very well.

MudPuppy
December 2, 2008, 03:46 PM
The cool thing is that my 7.62x39 pistol is good to go? I've seen those HK clones in 308 and that's within spec too?

Reminds me of "What's a barrel shroud?"

HoosierQ
December 2, 2008, 04:12 PM
Oh man...this is too good an opportunity to pass up...I just cannot help myself...it's too easy!!!

Once and for all the caliber war is over and 9mm wins! Hallelujah!

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
December 2, 2008, 04:59 PM
Two things:

My mistake: The laws says "larger than .45 caliber is prohibited" - NOT, ".45 cal or smaller is allowed" - same thing though, essentially. Thus leaves open all the questions I raised initially.

The question (no clear answer to this) is, "When is a caliber 'larger than' .45 caliber?" Is it at .4500000001, .451, .456 (rounded up means .46 caliber), .455555555 (again, rounded up, this is .46 caliber), .459, .459999999, .4600000000, or some other answer???? Or do we scrap actual diameter (caliber) altogether and run with simply the specific proper name of the cartridge to determine the "caliber"? :confused:

I agree that ONE reasonable interpretation (in fact, probably THE most reasonable interpretation) is that .45 acp is banned, because it clearly is, under a strict plain english detonation, "larger than .45 caliber", since .45 caliber means .45000000000000000, not .4500000000001 or larger (certainly not .451, .452, or larger, under a strict reading).

Second thing, this law is stupid NOT so much because it (may) bar the .454 casull or .45-70, but it's stupid because it bars the excellent defense caliber of .50 GI.

Oh yeah, 7.62x39mm is good to go, baby!!!! :) : http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=409781

An overzealous DA might try to persuade a jury to disregard common usage and agree with nitpicking about exact dimensions.
+1. Does anyone here want to be the test case?

BTW, I actually read a transcript where attorneys tried to trip up someone
on the difference between "caliber" and "millimeter" --it was done on purpose.
Trust me, someone will break out calipers in court if it comes down to it to
win their case and assure a good track record.

Absolutely, YES! (unfortunately)

Rossshady120
December 2, 2008, 05:05 PM
what wack state is this? i know in NY they have a 10 round limit but you can carry what you want. i know my friend in S.C packs a FN 5.7 and a glock 9mm and i think FL. law states you can only carry one gun at a time.

proud2deviate
December 2, 2008, 05:41 PM
Sounds like the gun can't be larger than .45 caliber. Do they measure across the lands or grooves? Or does it apply to the whole gun? 3/8" diameter pen gun, perhaps?

This law reeks of rediculousosity. Fail.

ConstitutionCowboy
December 2, 2008, 07:33 PM
Another thing to take into account is that the Oklahoma law doesn't say, ".45 Inches", it says, ".45 caliber", and "caliber" is defind as the internal diameter of a gun barrel or tube. Doesn't much matter what the diameter of the bullet is.

Woody

General Geoff
December 2, 2008, 07:46 PM
If what Woody says is correct, then it indeed becomes a question of measuring from the lands or the grooves.

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
December 2, 2008, 08:11 PM
OK, forget the bullet. Let's go with "CALIBER" (of the barrel/bore).

But is the "Caliber" the Land Diameter (as is the convention in Europe), or the Groove Diameter (as is the convention in the USA)? Chew on that one. If it's the Euro groove diameter, then pretty much any .45 is gonna be ok (except maybe .45-70). It's certainly arguable either way, which just goes to show the stupidity of legislators, and how making laws is a lot like making sausage - neither the process nor the final product is pretty to watch! :eek: :rolleyes:

Flyboy
December 2, 2008, 11:41 PM
MudPuppy beat me to the question I'd really like to see answered: is an AR/AK pistol chambered for .223/7.62 legal for carry? It's smaller than a .45, but clearly violating the spirit of the law.

bratch
December 2, 2008, 11:53 PM
MudPuppy beat me to the question I'd really like to see answered: is an AR/AK pistol chambered for .223/7.62 legal for carry? It's smaller than a .45, but clearly violating the spirit of the law.

Comes down to overall dimensions. If they are classified as a pistol and fit in the range you should be good to go.

The KelTec PLRs are too long to fit the definition not sure on the various AK/AR pistols.

2. "Pistol" means any derringer, revolver or semiautomatic firearm which:

a. has an overall length of less than sixteen (16) inches and is able to be fully concealed from detection and view,

b. is capable of discharging a projectile composed of any material which may reasonably be expected to be able to cause lethal injury,

c. is designed to be held and fired by the use of a single hand, and

d. uses either gunpowder, gas or any means of rocket propulsion to discharge the projectile. The definition of pistol for purposes of the Oklahoma Self-Defense Act shall not apply to homemade or imitation pistols, flare guns, underwater fishing guns or blank pistols.

http://www.oscn.net/applications/oscn/DeliverDocument.asp?CiteID=69785

7.62X25mm
December 3, 2008, 01:35 AM
Legal statute says "45 cal."

"Forty-Five Caliber" is generally understood to include even the 45/70 Govt. and probably .458 Lott / Win. Mag. -- where the bullet diameter is 0.458" or even 0.459" in lead cast bullets.

The way the statute is written, it specifies 0.45" -- which would be anything smaller than 0.46".

And so the bullet diameter could run 0.4599999999999999999999" etc. before it's "larger than 0.45" dia.

FEDERAL statute limits bore diameter to 0.50" with special exclusions for "sporting purposes."

I would guess any state statute restricting bore diameter to anything less than 0.50" would be superceded by Federal Law.

That'd be my view.

JackOfAllTradesMasterAtNone
December 3, 2008, 02:07 AM
LOL, I can't imagine CCW .454 Casull! No, I couldn't conceal a 10" barrel big framed Casull revolver as much as I could conceal a 12" barrel S&W500 revolver.

But, I can go along with this as I am a mear 5' 7", 155 pounds. Hiding my 7 1/2" Ruger Super Black Hawk in any caliber is pretty simple. Under my hunting jacket while driving. During Deer season, (or any other time), It is illegal to have a loaded weapon in the vehicle/on the person in my state of Washington. Rifle (at any time), or pistol unless the person has a CWP (ccw) for a pistol. So, my .44mag that I carry when Deer or Bear hunting, with hand loads of 300gn Sierra JSP pushed by 19gns of AA#9 to just a tad over 1,100fps/near 700 pounds of energy and capable of killing 'just about' any north american wild game, (certainly a frail human), in the hands of an experienced shooter at respectable distance to target would be legal in the great state of Oklahoma. I have taken several Deer with pistol, so it's on me, any time I'm in the woods or traveling to the woods.

But this snub nose Ruger Alaskan in .480Ruger or .454Casull that weighs in at just a bit more than my SS 1911 'would not and might not' be legal in Oklahoma?
http://www.ruger.com/Firearms/images/Products/361L.jpg

Sounds to be an ill-informed legislature that aproved this < or =.45cal law. This is clearly something that needs to be approached by lobbying a state representative to ammend the law to allow all pistol calibers that are within 'Federal' limitations. I believe that is .50 cal?

-Steve

Guns and more
December 3, 2008, 11:33 AM
It does not say Bullets with a diameter of > .450000". It says .45 caliber. Now you just have to figure out what that means.

Laws are written by people with no clue about guns. When Diane Feinstein wrote the assault weapons ban, she went through a gun catalog and marked the ones that "looked mean". Don't expect logic.

hiker44
December 3, 2008, 11:51 AM
That law is just to keep the honest, law abiding citizen from carrying something that would outgun the local cops -- like one of the easily concealable S&W 500 Magnums, which everyone knows is way too easy to conceal. LOL

ConstitutionCowboy
December 3, 2008, 12:22 PM
... Except for the sparks that fly off the muzzle of my Desert Eagle in my ankle holster when I jog, you'd never know I was carrying!:what::evil:

Woody

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
December 3, 2008, 02:26 PM
Oops:

a. has an overall length of less than sixteen (16) inches and is able to be fully concealed from detection and view,

[....]

c. is designed to be held and fired by the use of a single hand, and

So I guess an AK pistol is out....

HoosierQ
December 3, 2008, 04:03 PM
The whole thing is really Caliper vs. Caliber isn't .

For what it's worth, there was a reason this silly law says "greater than 45 caliber". We have got to assume that during the process of crafting this thing, a bunch of legislators came to some sort of compromise during which they must have agreed that a 45 (note the lack of the decimal point here) is a perfectly sensible, useful, and common caliber for a handgun. So they all agreed, or 2/3rds did, that 45 would be the cutoff. So that part, with nothing else taken into consideration, makes sense. In other words they had a debate and agreed the 45 was a typical, common everyday cartridge.

The problem that is being debated now is that the wording, as is so often the case in law, was done poorly and the actual physicial diameter of the thing can be open to interpretation. If you have a good lawyer, who was really prepared, you'd get off because he'd show the jury a picture of your gun and it would say ".45 Auto" on it. He'd show them the box your ammo came in and it would say ".45 Auto"...he'd show them a spent casing...etc. The other side would be duh.....

Unless ....The other side really wants your butt and they go the caliper route and say, "we'll lookie here...this says .452...sorry Charlie".

Take for example Nebraska's child safety law or whatever it was. The one where the pointy headed lawmakers wanted to reduce the incidents of newborns being left on doorsteps to maybe die by making a law that said "a child may be left at a hospital with not fear of prosecution". Duh...pointy headed legislators...a child is someone under 18 in your state. Stupid use of words gets you a stupid law.

Now of course here, the whole thing is stupid. My argument is confined to the Caliber vs Caliper thing and the 45.

WardenWolf
December 4, 2008, 08:20 PM
I wouldn't push it. I'd assume they meant .45 ACP and .45 Long Colt, and leave it at that. Regardless of true diameter, they're more likely to rule based on the designation. A bullet designated simply ".45" is very unlikely to get much scrutiny. One designated .454 and being grossly overpowered will.

JaxNovice
December 4, 2008, 08:45 PM
I'd assume they meant .45 ACP and .45 Long Colt, and leave it at that.

I would never assume anything when it comes to something like this. If you ccw a .45acp and end up shooting someone in defense odf your life, the bottom line is that a pushy DA could make a very plausable case that you are in violation of the law.

moooose102
December 4, 2008, 08:53 PM
yep, 454 casul is a 45 caliber, so is a 45/70 thompson center contender pistol. and, if someone made such a monster, so would a 458 winchester magnum pistol. as long as the bullet diameter is less than .460", it is a 45 caliber.

sig220mw
December 5, 2008, 06:47 AM
I doubt that any of those brilliant politicians even have any idea that not all 45 calibers are exactly equal in dimension. They are experts at writing laws
about things they don't know squat about.

steveracer
December 5, 2008, 07:16 AM
.451 by any definition would be illegal if the legal (mathematical) limit was .45
This means NO .45 caliber handguns that I know of would be legal in OK.
Steve

punkndisorderly
December 5, 2008, 08:05 AM
If I lived in OK, and really wanted to konw, my first stop would be the Oklahoma State Rifle Association. They should be very familiar with the law and how it's applied.

My next stop would be to contact the state attourney's office to ask for clarification. Generally, I'd put it like this: "The law says .45 caliber, amy I correct in assuming that this means cartridges that are commonly referred to as .45 caliber such as .45 ACP, .45 Colt, .454 Casull, etc. All of these are generally referred to as .45 caliber, but are actually .45XX caliber if measured with a caliper. Thank you for any clarification you can provide."

Save any response you get, and rock on. A forum is generally a bad place to get legal advice since "but BiGBaDWolFe784 said it was OK" isn't going to help you much in court.

That said, I believe the intent of the law would come into play if there was a question. The intent would have to be shown in the minutes from any deliberation on the law. I assume the intent was to allow .45 ACP and .45 Colt.

Also, I would hate to wind up in court trying to defend a self defense shooting with a .454. It's sad that what was used to defend ones self can come into the case, rather than just "was the shooting justified or not". However, it can and does (for example the guy convicted of murder due to a 10mm because regular firearms just weren't deadly enough according to the prosecutor).

madmike
December 5, 2008, 10:14 AM
".45 caliber" in gunnery parlance means you can't have a barrel longer than .45 times the muzzle.

So, as long as you carry a .3" snubbie...

Man, the ways I could screw with that law. hehehe

tulsamal
December 6, 2008, 11:03 AM
Why would you want to carry something like a 454 or a 460 around town? Do you have lots of angry wildebeest roaming the streets?

Well, in the first place, the whole restriction is just wrong. If you have the permit, it should be up to you what you want to carry. It annoys me to no end that Oklahoma put that in the law. If I wanted to spend the money to buy one of those .50 1911's, why would it somehow be illegal for me to carry it?

And this did affect my buying plans once. I really, really liked the Ruger Alaskan in .480 Ruger. As a long time reloader, I was intrigued with the idea of getting one and trying a whole bunch of different combinations. The gun would be used mainly around my property and mostly just for fun. But more than once I thought of circumstances where it might be useful for CCW. We're not talking about "city use" here. But after my local Sheriff's office put me face down in the gravel and threatened to shoot me for open carry out on my rural road, I had to transition to concealed carry as much as possible. If the .480 Alaskan had become my regular "working gun on the ranch," there would have been times where I would have carried it under a coat off the property. And that would be illegal in OK.

The other thing is think of rural places and loaded handguns in their farm vehicles. If I keep the .480 Alaskan in the truck while I'm working on the property and then drive to town, that loaded gun is covered by my CCW. If I didn't have a CCW, a loaded handgun in the cab of my truck would be illegal. But if the loaded handgun is a .480 Alaskan, now I'm illegal again.

It's just a stupid requirement put in by somebody who didn't know what the hell they were doing. I keep hoping it will be dropped in some future legislative fine-tuning.

I recently had an AK pistol built. AMD65. Shoots great and didn't need any US parts. The funny thing is that that gun would be legal for CCW in OK. So I'm thinking about getting a Pelican case that would hold that "handgun" and maybe 3-4 loaded mags. Then I'll keep that in my truck. Gives me something that is "almost as good as a rifle" but is legal to keep loaded in my vehicle since it is actually a handgun and covered by my CCW! Laws are a funny thing sometimes.

Gregg

And I never did get my .480 Alaskan before Ruger dropped them! Then reintroduced them as a five shot. Then dropped them again after they made like 25 of them!!!!! The new .44 Special FT is wonderful but I'm still strongly irritated about the whole .480 Alaskan fiasco!!!

MT GUNNY
December 6, 2008, 12:07 PM
A good Lawyer could get you buy.

JR47
December 6, 2008, 12:44 PM
It has little to do with what is easily carried, or "too powerful". The 1911A1 style of pistol in .50 GI is concealable, but would be considered illegal.

It may also be a case of the owner, not being a veritable arsenal of weapons, wishing to use what they own, not what they have to buy. :)

george29
December 6, 2008, 01:01 PM
NM has a similar law. Back of my CCW License has an Authorized Firearms Section divided into Category (semiauto & revolver) & Caliber.
In my case I am authorized to carry in semiauto a .45 or smaller caliber, in revolver I am authorized to carry a 44S or smaller category (which is wierd because I quallified with my SBH but the instructor noted that I used 44 special rounds).

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