Do you make test rounds when you switch bullets of the same weight?


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KegCommando
December 1, 2008, 11:40 PM
I was just curious if people start from scratch when going from Mfg A's bullet to Mfg B's bullet if both bullets weigh the same, and are of the same type?

For example A's 290gr FMJ vs B's 290gr FMJ.

Or how about when switching from two bullet shapes from the same Mfg.

For example A's 150gr RN vs A's 150gr FP?

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NCsmitty
December 1, 2008, 11:55 PM
Well the smart thing is to take the known load and drop a couple grains of powder before switching bullets, especially if your flirting with near max loads. Do I always do it? Not too often, truthfully. There's an even chance that the new bullet may or may not shoot as well. These are things you just have to try for your own information.

NCsmitty

bluetopper
December 2, 2008, 12:05 AM
No, but I'm not near as anal (I hate that term, I grew up with it having a whole other meaning) as a lot of others.

MMCSRET
December 2, 2008, 12:39 AM
No!!!!!!! I do not load into the 100% percentile. I can switch 158 gr. bullets around and not worry about it. I do not do it with hunting loads, I have used the same exact load in 270 Win. since 1973, it ain't broke so I ain't fixin' it.

bragood
December 2, 2008, 12:43 AM
Yes and no. I had the perfect load for my 308 with 168 grain AMAXs but wanted to use the 165 grain ssts. First I loaded the amaxs to judge and then the same load with the ssts and then loaded the ssts from 42.0 gr to 41.5, then 41.0, and then 42.5 and 43.0. I tested what I thought would shoot well first and it did and since I was satisfied I didnt test the others. This only works though if youre not flirting with death when you load like others have said.

JackOfAllTradesMasterAtNone
December 2, 2008, 01:09 AM
Every rifle barrel is different. Each will have its own likes and dislikes.

There's an even chance that the new bullet may or may not shoot as well.

I have some 180 gn.30cal loads for both Sierra and Speer boat tails that can't be loaded identically in my rifles. Well they can, but performance is quite different. Pushing the Sierra's to 3100fps degrades accuracy. But dropping them to 2800fps wrings better accuracy than I can get from the Speers at any velocity. But the Speers are more accurate than the Sierra's when I push them to 3100fps. Which is the most accurate? The Sierra's. But I use the Speer's for hunting accuracy at maximum velocity. (Yeah, I've played with seating depth, different powders and such..)

-Steve

Dean Williams
December 2, 2008, 01:30 AM
Unless I'm shooting light loads to begin with, (i.e. starting load recommendations) I do reduce a load with a bullet from a different manufacturer even though it is the same weight and shape.
Just because bullets from different makers look the same, and are the same weight and type, doesn't mean they will produce the same pressure for a given power/primer/case. Jacket thickness and the length of the bullet that bears on the rifling are not necessarily the same, and either of these two variables alone can affect pressure.

Dean W

qajaq59
December 2, 2008, 08:14 AM
I will generally reduce the load a little and work back up if I change any component.

243winxb
December 2, 2008, 09:22 AM
check all loading data first, then make adjustments if needed. The Barnes X bullet and a Sierra of the same weight and shape made very different pressures. So, best to go to the starting load, and work up for safety.

chriske
December 2, 2008, 09:39 AM
I'll tweak a bit up & down (say 2 tenths down, same & 2 tenths up), but won't start from scratch when switching from a known good load with one bullet weight/design to another (for instance 158 gr LRN to 158 gr LSWC in .38 Spl or 2 158 gr LSWC of different make)

chriske
December 2, 2008, 09:44 AM
Sorry, I should have added I don't even go NEAR max loads. Things may get more sensitive as you approach those.

philbo
December 2, 2008, 10:01 AM
For plinking ammo, no. For ammo that is at or near max pressure, yes. I will also run test loads when switching between batches of powder.

ranger335v
December 2, 2008, 10:10 AM
There is no absolute way to say so, for now, follow the cautious route and back off a bit. After a few years shooting reloads you will develop a "feel" for both the bullets and powder type you are using.

When you no longer feel a need to ask, you will know what is safe or not on your own.

KegCommando
December 2, 2008, 01:35 PM
I usually do but admit that at times I haven't, but I'm never near max.

The post came to me last night as I was about to sit down and sin again. :evil:

Midway was out of my Raniers, and I ordered some Berry's which arrived just in time last night for a trip to the desert this weekend. Since I knew I'd be pressed for time to make test rounds,hit the range to try them, and still make enough for all day shooting, I decided to risk life and limb. :eek:

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