lcp drop test


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moooose102
December 9, 2008, 08:10 AM
i accidentally did a drop test to my unmodified ruger lcp yesterday. you know, the one that is being recalled for fireing when it is dropped. well, it dropped from 4 feet (actually 49&3/4") onto our basement floor which is concrete covered with a foam back indoor/outdoor carpet. no problems. it just whent "whack" when it hit the floor. i must admit that i was holding my breath on the way down. and pleasantly relieved when it did not fire (it would have hit one of my dogs). i wonder how hard these have to be "dropped" to fire unintentionally. i will still send mine back in when the time comes, but it is nice to know that it probably wont go off in the real world, at least normal for me circumstances.:)

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Mad Magyar
December 9, 2008, 08:21 AM
Glad no one was hurt. It's entirely possible you could of dropped it a hundred times with varying force and nothing would have happened.
Many recalls are based on statistical incidence analysis, cost involved in correction, and legal $$$ if involved in a lawsuit.
Many mfgr's, like in the auto industry, will weigh the cost of the recall correction vs pay-outs in lawsuits. If their margin sheet says more profit in keeping it the way it is: no correction will be made. See'ya in court...
Evidently, Ruger felt otherwise.

Marcus L.
December 9, 2008, 08:38 AM
The LCP may only discharge when dropped 1 in 100 times. Also, you may have to drop it so that it lands on one particular part of the pistol at a certain angle in order to achieve a discharge. Either way, it's a risk that could be quite tragic. I hope that Ruger irons out the problems with the LCP. I'd like to get one some day, but not until they refine the design more and improve on it's safety.

presspuller
December 9, 2008, 08:38 AM
It would most likely have had to hit muzzle down to have made it fire but I'm glad the dogs are safe.:)

Marcus L.
December 9, 2008, 09:09 AM
Hrmm, I'm looking at the exploded view of the LCP and it doesn't have a firing pin block. Virtually all modern pistols have a firing pin block to prevent discharge during a drop. That explains how it can discharge during a drop. All you would need to do is drop it on the back of the pistol so that the striker's momentum pulls it rearward. With enough travel, it would return with enough force to set off the primer. A firing pin block prevents this by keeping the firing pin or striker from traveling unless the trigger is pulled. A protrusion on the trigger bar deactivates the firing pin block at the same time as it releases the hammer or striker to fire.

Hopefully they can come up with a striker block of some sort, otherwise it's going to be a thorn in the design and will keep me from ever buying one. It looks like they incorporated a firing pin block in the SR9 at least.

presspuller
December 9, 2008, 11:14 AM
Hrmm, I'm looking at the exploded view of the LCP and it doesn't have a firing pin block. Virtually all modern pistols have a firing pin block to prevent discharge during a drop. That explains how it can discharge during a drop. All you would need to do is drop it on the back of the pistol so that the striker's momentum pulls it rearward. With enough travel, it would return with enough force to set off the primer. A firing pin block prevents this by keeping the firing pin or striker from traveling unless the trigger is pulled. A protrusion on the trigger bar deactivates the firing pin block at the same time as it releases the hammer or striker to fire.


But the hammer spring is keeping the hammer pulled forward, the firing pin would have to override the hammer spring in order for the hammer to push the firing pin forward to fire. Or to drop (muzzle down)with enough force to make the firing pin go forward overriding the firing pin spring to make it fire.

Hopefully they can come up with a striker block of some sort, otherwise it's going to be a thorn in the design and will keep me from ever buying one. It looks like they incorporated a firing pin block in the SR9 at least.


If you need a firing pin block to make a hand gun safe enough for you to own you may need to stick to golf.

Hk Dan
December 9, 2008, 01:48 PM
Are you saying that you dropped a LOADED gun to see if it would fire? Oh, fella...next time put a primed case in it--no bullet, no powder, same result, less pain.

rcmodel
December 9, 2008, 02:05 PM
The Kel-Tec they copied uses the same system. The tiny firing pin is held to the rear by a strong spring, and it is too light to have enough inerta from a drop to fire a round.

The hammer is held off the firing pin by the hammer block safety until it is cocked and released by the trigger. That also clears the hammer block out of the way.

It doesn't need a firing pin block.
It just needs the hammer block to work correctly.

Apparently, some of the Rugers aren't!

rcmodel

Friendly, Don't Fire!
December 9, 2008, 02:14 PM
Are you saying that you dropped a LOADED gun to see if it would fire? Oh, fella...next time put a primed case in it--no bullet, no powder, same result, less pain.

The OP said they "accidentally" did a drop test. That tells me the drop was completely ACCIDENTAL in nature.:rolleyes:

moooose102
December 10, 2008, 07:06 AM
The OP said they "accidentally" did a drop test. That tells me the drop was completely ACCIDENTAL in nature.

yes, COMPLETELY accidental. i do not like to tempt fate. for me, it usually wins. i am one of those "if it wernt for bad luck i'd have no luck at all" kind of people. but it seems this time, i did get lucky. or, maybe, it was my dog that got lucky, instead of me. plus, i wouldn't drop ANY firearm on purpose. i know they are relatively rugged, but i dont like any more damage to my guns that is totally necessary. i even try to keep them from getting scratched out in the woods when hunting.

shooter429
December 10, 2008, 07:44 PM
including me:) Do not worry about it. The recall is a just to be on the safe side thing. None of them are actually dangerous.

Shooter429

351 WINCHESTER
December 10, 2008, 08:45 PM
Sounds to me that the fp springs on the lcp may be too weak.

Rustynuts
December 10, 2008, 09:57 PM
I've dropped my loaded P3AT twice from about 7.5' directly onto a hard tile floor! :what: Actually it slipped out of the cheapo nylon holster I'm using, so technically I didn't fumble the actual gun. :evil: Hit once smack almost vertical on the rear of the slide. Put a little dent into the steel. No discharges though (except into the rear of my pants!). Need to get a better gripping leather holster.

Kind of Blued
December 11, 2008, 02:46 AM
Are you saying that you dropped a LOADED gun to see if it would fire? Oh, fella...next time put a primed case in it--no bullet, no powder, same result, less pain.

Try again.

Flame Red
December 11, 2008, 02:18 PM
Children, don't try this at home.

A friend of mine's fiance (male) was killed when he did an 'accidental' drop test of a plastic-fantastic (I don't know which manufacturer or model) off an ironing board while he was ironing his pants. Understandably my friend (female) can't talk about it without getting hysterical - she asked him to iron his pants before going out.

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