Reloading for AR-10


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tbraddy
December 13, 2008, 10:40 AM
Hello to all. I hate just posting to ask for information, but it seems I don't have any info that has not been garnered here. My question is this: Can anyone tell me where to find info on C.O.L., powder charges, etc., for reloading for an Armalite AR-10? I will be using Varget powder, CCI No. 34 Arsenal primers, and Hornady 150 gr. FMJBT bullets. I tried a search, but wasn't able to find what I wanted. My brass is once-fired (from my AR) W-W 7.62x51 white box. Thanks for the help in advance. I don't mind doing the reading if anyone has a direction they can point me in.

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rcmodel
December 13, 2008, 12:49 PM
Hornady manual has a chapter on loading 7.62 NATO ammo for the M1A or other semi-auto rifles.

Those loads should be perfect for the AR-10 also.

rcmodel

bullseye308
December 13, 2008, 12:50 PM
The OAL is not gun specific, it is caliber specific. You will still need to full length size because it is a semi, not a bolt gun. Any load manual will give you the info you need on COAL, powder charge, etc. From Hodgdon's site:
Hodgdon Varget .308" 2.800" 44.0 2522 43,300 CUP 47.0C 2675 50,300 CUP

Start at 44.0gr stop at 47.0 which will be compressed. I have had the best results at 45.0-45.5.

tbraddy
December 13, 2008, 02:28 PM
Thanks for the info. I have a Lyman manual, and it doesn't have anything specific about reloading for a semi-auto, military style rifle. I'll check on the Hornady book and see if I can pick one up at my local gun store. My biggest concern was C.O.L., I didn't want to cause myself any feeding problems. It sure is nice to get help when you need it. I love this site!!

rcmodel
December 13, 2008, 02:31 PM
Your COL guage is the magazine.

If it will fit in the magazine, it will feed.

If you are loading FMJ bullets, or hunting bullets with a crimp cannelure on them, that is the OAL.

rcmodel

tbraddy
December 13, 2008, 03:33 PM
Pretty common-sense. Thanks, I can work with that. I am always a little too cautious when starting a new round, it serves me well in the safety department.

SlamFire1
December 14, 2008, 11:56 AM
Don't forget to set up your sizing die with a cartridge case headspace gage. And size to gage minimum. The "Go" datum line.

Neck sizing, partial sizing, do not apply. Bench rest stuff is great for single shot bench rest rifles. This is a semi automatic mechanism. You want rounds that will drop into the chamber without any resistance, and you want the bolt to close on the round without any resistance.

As for OAL, you will find that most 308 bullets are pretty jump insensitive. I used to seat all my match bullets LT 2.800", now I am seating them 2.750". They all shoot fine.

Hey tell us how the 150 FMJ's do with Varget. I was impressed with how well these Hornady's shot in my Ruger, once I hit a sweet spot.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Targets/150Hornady435grsAA2520.jpg

steve4102
December 14, 2008, 06:50 PM
The OAL is not gun specific, it is caliber specific.

OAL is gun specific not caliber or manual specific. Each firearm is different and theThe individual reloader is free to adjust this dimension to suit their particular firearm-component-weapon combination.
This parameter is determined by various dimensions such as 1) magazine length (space), 2) freebore-lead dimensions of
the barrel, 3) ogive or profile of the projectile and 4) position of cannelure or crimp groove.

tbraddy
December 14, 2008, 09:29 PM
Thanks again for the info and advice, all. I went to the range today and have enough brass for a good loading session. I will post what I come up with. I took a friend with me, I sure hate it when someone shows me up with my own weapons... Oh well, just more incentive to practice and get back to the form I once had when I was a "lean, mean fighting machine". So many years gone by. :rolleyes:

waffentomas
December 16, 2008, 12:23 AM
Make sure the primers are seated deeply enough. The free floating firing pin can detonate one (slam-fire) if they are too high.

Tom

tbraddy
December 16, 2008, 08:38 PM
If anyone is still reading this thread:
Tonight's reloading session has been a bust. I have already broken my table (graciously loaned by my wife), and only have sized one case. I am having trouble with something, obviously. I am using Lee pacesetter dies, and resizing brass from my rifle as stated in the first post. The cases DO NOT want to be resized. They are not sticking, I am having to use excessive force to try to get them in the die, hence the broken table. They are measuring 2.000-2.005" long untrimmed, and the case neck is .345-.347" before sizing. The one case I did get in and out measures .332" after being sized. Are my cases out of whack before sizing? Is my sizing die the problem? The cases seem to be hanging up on the case neck. The shoulder of the case doesn't seem to be offering as much resistance. The neck seems to be bulging slightly as I try to size them. Any thoughts?

tbraddy
December 16, 2008, 08:39 PM
BTW, nice shooting, slamfire:cool:

SlamFire1
December 18, 2008, 09:20 AM
The cases DO NOT want to be resized. They are not sticking, I am having to use excessive force to try to get them in the die, hence the broken table.

I searched the post to see if you mentioned what type of press you are using. I hope you are not using some 50's or 60's vintage press that does not have compound leverage.

Lee Pace Setter dies are standard sizing dies. Nothing unusual there.

I suspect you are using Lee Lube, or one of those spray on lubes. I have had terrible experiences with that stuff. Once the Lee Lube dries it is extremely difficult to size cases, at least in my small base dies. This has been the same experience with the spray on lubes.

My favorite lube is RCBS water soluble. The amount of force it takes to small base size a case with RCBS water soluble is reasonable, and the stuff washes off in the sink. The other lube that works well for difficult sizing is Imperial Sizing Wax. I don’t often use Imperial because you have apply the lube with your fingertips. It is much simpler and time effective to tumble my cases in a can, with a RCBS saturated patch, on my Thumler’s tumbler.

Let me suggest purchasing a Black and Decker type workbench. I am still using my 1983 vintage workbench, on it is mounted my Redding T-7 press. I cut a thick piece of plywood to fit across the top, bolted that to the workbench top. Drilled through plywood and bench deck for mounting screws to the press.

You can find these older Black and Decker workbenches dirt cheap at garage sales. Or you can spend close to $100.00 for one at Home Depot.

Harbor freight has cheap chinese versions, but they are very flimsy.

Walkalong
December 18, 2008, 09:59 AM
The OAL is not gun specific, it is caliber specific.
OAL is gun specific not caliber or manual specificMax O.A.L. is caliber specific, just like SAMMI max and min. Your gun determines if you can exceed that, but the max O.A.L. is caliber specific.

USSR
December 18, 2008, 10:39 AM
I think two different and distinct things are being talked about here: case OAL (which is cartridge specific); and cartridge OAL (which is gun specific).

Don

steve4102
December 18, 2008, 06:42 PM
Max O.A.L. is caliber specific, just like SAMMI max and min. Your gun determines if you can exceed that, but the max O.A.L. is caliber specific.

Do you mean "cartridge" specific and not caliber specific or am I missing something.

SAAMI Min and MAX are guidlines only. Here is what Accurate has to say about OAL and SAMMI.

"SPECIAL NOTE ON CARTRIDGE OVERALL LENGTH “COL”
It is important to note that the SAAMI “COL” values are for the firearms and ammunition manufacturers industry and must
be seen as a guideline only.
The individual reloader is free to adjust this dimension to suit their particular firearm-component-weapon combination.
This parameter is determined by various dimensions such as 1) magazine length (space), 2) freebore-lead dimensions of
the barrel, 3) ogive or profile of the projectile and 4) position of cannelure or crimp groove."

tbraddy
December 18, 2008, 10:14 PM
Thanks again for the info, all. I have both Lee sizing lube, and one-shot. To me, the Lee stuff is much better, but both have worked fine for my .223 work. I wasn't sure what to expect with the .308, and so far we ain't getting along. I will not let it get the best of me, though. My press is a Lee deluxe turret press. Not the best, or strongest, but what I could afford (read: allowed to purchase). It has done well with my .45 ACP, also. It'll be this weekend before I can fix or replace the bench. Anything else I may be missing?

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