arisakas


PDA






k9870
December 13, 2008, 08:13 PM
cheap at the stores around but ive heard some things i want to clear up

are late manufactures really unsafe to fire or is it mostly bs?
and can you really keep your brass and load a .303 british bullet in it? cause reloading for an arisaka and an enfield with same bullets would be cool

If you enjoyed reading about "arisakas" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
MM
December 13, 2008, 08:20 PM
k98,
They are expensive to feed. I have my Dad's bring back, a 6.5mm, long barrel, bayonet, too. Type 38 I think.
The story regarding late models is that the metallurgy suffered as the defeat of the Empire grew immiment.
Re: .303, no idea. But, if 30 caliber = 7.62, this is substanialy larger in diameter than my 6.5. Later variants were 7.7, I think, so the .303 may work there.
MM

k9870
December 13, 2008, 08:42 PM
yeah they are 7.7 hornady ammos like 22 bucks a box but its reloadable and .303 bullets are cheap and common.

Aren't we all
December 13, 2008, 08:50 PM
K98, are you talking about a Type 99 arisaka in 7.7x58mm? If so the .303 bullets still wouldn't work because they are measured differently everywhere and if they are British surplus they differer crazily so just get the right bullets or buy Norma 7.7 if you want to shoot your ariskaka.


Marsh

k9870
December 13, 2008, 09:03 PM
i mean just the bullet, still the 7.7 brass and enfield would be .303 british brass, .303 bullet.

jlmurphy
December 13, 2008, 11:43 PM
The Arisaka 7.7 uses a .310/.311 diameter bullet, just like the .303 British, the 7.62x54R, and the 7.62x39. You can buy Sierra 150 gr. bullets from Midway.

Ian
December 14, 2008, 01:39 AM
The Type 99 Arisaka, in 7.7 Japanese, uses the same .311" bullets as the .303 British cartridge.

Later production Type 99s are progressively cruder, but not generally unsafe to shoot (though any old surplus gun should be checked before firing). The unsafe stigma came from a very small number of absolute last-ditch rifles made with cast iron receivers (called Type 02/45s by collectors). Even on those, the bolt locks into the barrel and not the receiver, so I bet most of them would be safe. Anyway, those cast iron rifles are very rare, and worth way more as collectibles than as shooters.

k9870
December 14, 2008, 04:01 PM
if 7.62x54r or 7.62x39 bullets are same size can they be fired accurately in 7.7 brass?

WardenWolf
December 14, 2008, 04:25 PM
cheap at the stores around but ive heard some things i want to clear up

are late manufactures really unsafe to fire or is it mostly bs?
and can you really keep your brass and load a .303 british bullet in it? cause reloading for an arisaka and an enfield with same bullets would be cool

Late-manufactured Arisakas MAY be dangerous to shoot, and you should always have a gunsmith inspect one before you use it. However, I have talked to many people who say they will shoot these Last Ditch rifles. One person said, "They may look like crap but shoot great, or they may look great but shoot like s***." Most Last Ditch examples surviving today are perfectly safe, although if you use one you should inspect it regularly for wear. To determine what you are looking at, you should compare it to these samples:

http://oldrifles.com/japanese.htm

Notice, on the early series, the hole in the stock that is just above and behind the crossbar, just rear of the indentation in the stock. All rifles made until at least mid-war had this hole (which has no discernable purpose).

If the rifle you are looking at has this hole, it is an early war Arisaka. If it lacks this hole, but otherwise looks good and has all of the core features (such as the flip-up peep sight and a steel buttplate), it is most likely mid-war. If it looks crude, has a wooden buttplate, and just general poor construction, it is late war.

Any early to mid-war Arisaka should be perfectly safe to shoot as long as it has not suffered damage. There are various places online where you can still source Arisaka parts, which is how I repaired my early-war Series 21 Kokura (the military removed some parts before they let my grandfather ship it home). Late-war Arisakas should be examined carefully. If the action seems sound, ask about a return policy and tell them you would like to have a gunsmith check it out.

The Arisaka does use a .311 bullet. You can buy loaded Hornady ammunition for about $21 a box of 20, shoot and enjoy them, then reload them with either 150-grain or other-weight bullets. The early-war Arisakas are extremely strong; indeed they had one of the strongest receivers of any military rifle produced up until that time, comparable or superior to even Germany's Mausers in terms of the pressures they could take. With a good barrel and the right bullets, they're also very accurate. Because of this, a good Arisaka is something of value, and can be a quite serviceable shooting or hunting rifle even today.

When reloading, be aware that some people like to load them a bit hotter than the Japanese originally did. I have seen Arisaka 99 loads that have a fairly mild kick that's not at all uncomfortable, and I have seen them that will kick like a Mosin Nagant with heavy ball. You should stay within the recommended loads. I actually recommend the 150-grain bullets. That will reduce your recoil to a very comfortable amount, while still giving you a lot of stopping power.

SlamFire1
December 14, 2008, 04:41 PM
Late-manufactured Arisakas MAY be dangerous to shoot, and you should always have a gunsmith inspect one before you use it.

If you are not savvy about what an Arisaka should look like, take it to a gunsmith. The WWII generation had a lot of negative legends about the Arisaka, and they have been proven incorrect. The Japanese never built an unsafe firearm, even the last ditch ones.

However, there are a number of perfect good looking Japanese training rifles around that are dangerous to shoot. This is the ground zero for the "cast iron" Japanese rifle legends from the WWII generation. These Training rifles are made of cast iron. They were never meant to be fired with a service round, just a wooden tipped blank. And they look real.

I picked one up at the local high volume gunstore. These guys get lots of guns in, and they did not recognize my future rifle as anything different from a standard Japanese Arisaka. But it was. It was just off on little details. A major detail difference was that there was no rifling in the barrel. The training rifle functions in every aspect to a service rifle, takes a bayonet, has a cleaning rod hole, just its construction is cruder, and the dimensions are a little off.


I got mine for $68.00. I suspect it might be worth a bit more, but don't know. I shudder to think what would have happened if someone else had bought it and stuck a round down the chamber. The round would have gone off. WWII vets brought these things back and blew themselves to kingdom com when they stuck a service rifle round in one of these.

WardenWolf
December 14, 2008, 04:47 PM
Slamfire, some of the later Arisakas had completely untreated steel. These guns could potentially suffer chamber deformation due to pressure from firing. While this is rare because these guns were heavily overdesigned to start with, it can happen. Again, he should have a gunsmith inspect it. Use the link I provided to approximate the age. Also, I will give you this link, which will help you read the markings on the gun:

http://www.radix.net/~bbrown/japanese_markings.html

I spent a long time researching my Arisaka 99, and I happily pass my knowledge along to you.

If you enjoyed reading about "arisakas" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!