Weapons in Foster Homes


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wky46
December 21, 2008, 01:45 AM
Considering opening my home to foster children. Also concidering a CCDW permit.
When perusing my statepolice website for CCDW I came across this-

'Restrictions on Carry by Qualified License Holders'
"A concealed deadly weapon SHALL NOT be carried in the following places:
....... or any certified family child care home."

I keep a handgun in my glove box (legal) and I'm concidering CC because my job requires that I occasionaly travel across states that have reciprocal laws and of course need to be legal.

Anyone see any ambiguity in the phrasing that would keep me from obtaining a permit?

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Prince Yamato
December 21, 2008, 01:52 AM
or any certified family child care home

I'm thinking it means homes for mentally disabled children, not your own home.

kd7nqb
December 21, 2008, 01:53 AM
This case just recently came up in Oregon in a little different flavor but I am guessing your in a different state so I dont know how much I can help without knowing where you live.

By the way thanks for being a foster parent, your doing good work.

Ron James
December 21, 2008, 02:20 AM
State laws differ, here in Arizona my house is inspected every two years. It also depends on the inspectors. Some have common sense. some don't. One inspector a few years back stated my black powder firearms on the wall were OK. that a child wasn't likely to take one down and load it. Another inspector stated that they ere still firearms and had to have a trigger lock { think about that, on a Hawken!} The last one said all firearms had to be secured and with a cable lock. Of course the ammo had to be separate. I just smile , say yes and after they leave go my merry way. The fire arm I have in my bed room is a .45, no child is going to rack the slide, it's also in a little safe. Of course my firearms are secure. except the ones I have on the wall, after the inspector leaves they go back on the wall. It's odd. I also have a knife collection in unlocked display cabinet in my office, very wicked and sharp knives, no one has ever said a word about them. To protect yourself you have to make sure your home is safe but you also have to understand that some of these government inspectors have no common sense at all. You have to check the state laws in your state. I have a CCW, I don't walk around the house armed, but I do carry when I'm out and about and no one has ever asked me about it. They don't ask, I don't tell .Also it's a visual inspection, not a house search. The last one only was concerned about guns and prescription med. being secure. But be aware, you will fall in love with these kids and cry when they leave. My wife and I adopted 3 of them. We've been foster parents for over 20 years with no regrets

armoredman
December 21, 2008, 04:11 AM
Oddly enough, Ron, a few years back my wife and I were considering fostering here in AZ, and the first person who came out to do a hiome inspection FREAKED when i came out in uniform to go to work, telling her we could NOT have ANY assmebled firearms in the home if we were going to foster, and my duty sidearm would have to be secured in SOMEONE ELSES'S home! Needless to say, we declined thier services, and my wife got this woman to sputter like a busted engine, when she asked them, if we were to protect the child while in our custody, how could we if they insisted we get rid of the best method of protection from invasion/burglars/etc?

divemedic
December 21, 2008, 07:02 AM
That is funny, since accidental firearm discharge only kills 75 children under the age of 15. Firearm suicide kills 84 children under the age of 15, and homicide by firearm is 230, firearm death with unknown intent: 15.

That means that there are 404 children under the age of 15 are killed by firearms each year. Compare that to:

Motor vehicle accidents: 2,210
Drowning: 810

It would be more effective to tell you that you can have a bathtub, buckets, a pool, or a car than to tell you that you cannot have a gun.

Disclosure: This is according to the CDC figures, Number of deaths from 113 selected causes by age: United States, 2005 (http://www.disastercenter.com/cdc/Age%20of%20Deaths%20113%20Causes%202005.html). Figures used are for children, birth to 15 years of age. The next higher age category was age 15 to 24, which would have caused me to use the figures for more adults than children. Unlike the Brady Campaign, I am actually trying for accuracy.

armoredman
December 21, 2008, 07:19 AM
Yes, Divemedic, but LIEberals have swimming pools and Lexus cars they'd hate to give up. Banning things to feel good only works if you ban things OTHER people have...and YOU don't have to lose.

Thin Black Line
December 21, 2008, 10:23 AM
or any certified family child care home.

How is this term defined in your state statute? Foster care, day care, both?

As has been said, every state is different and you will run into many different
caseworkers and foster care/daycare license inspectors (sometimes they
are one and the same). In rural areas and non-gun-hysterical-phobic states
they will just ask if you have a gun safe and/or other ways to secure your
firearm(s) when not in use. If the child welfare agency has some administrative
rules addressing firearms in how they are to license a home, just ask to see
these in advance. If you run into a beaurocrat who violates this, go up one
level. Many states are in desparate need of good foster homes.

There are some things you need to consider:

I knew a foster kid years back who absolutely loved going hunting with his
foster dad. He really enjoyed this. He never had a problem in the home.
Now on the flipside, there are foster kids with "histories" who could jiggle
apart the typical gym locker gun safe in under five minutes, have your
favorite glock in their waistband next to their cellphone, and set themselves
up as the drug kingpin on your block within 24 hrs after arriving on your
doorstep. Then there's the emotionally disturbed kid who upon reflecting
how he was "abandoned" (actually severely abused or neglected) by his
family wakes up one day (or in the middle of the night at 2am) and just
says "F it". Reminds me of the time it was reported to me by this little old
lady who woke up one night with a knife at her throat. She had a good
conversation with him and he went back to bed. But, that could've gone
either way.

Well, you're beginning to get where I'm going with this. There's a lot to think
about other than just the legalities of the CCW and the foster care license.
That said, it might be the most rewarding thing you will ever do.

The Lone Haranguer
December 21, 2008, 10:30 AM
Now on the flipside, there are foster kids with "histories" who could jiggle
apart the typical gym locker gun safe in under five minutes, have your
favorite glock in their waistband next to their cellphone, and set themselves
up as the drug kingpin on your block within 24 hrs after arriving on your
doorstep. Then there's the emotionally disturbed kid who upon reflecting
how he was "abandoned" (actually severely abused or neglected) by his
family wakes up one day (or in the middle of the night at 2am) and just
says "F it".
That was the first thing that came to my mind.

Thin Black Line
December 21, 2008, 11:13 AM
They came to my mind due to actual cases. And, no, I can't legally cite
locations, dates, etc.

Mrs. Armoredman
December 21, 2008, 01:04 PM
WKY46 and Ron James,

Yes the laws in states are different. We wanted to foster kids in our home. The state made it so hard on the both of us we told them to cancel our application. I will not take apart my gun so it's unuseable if a bad guy breaks in. I spoke with the ladys bosses and told them point blank. I am not going to take apart my firearm and allow someone to break into my home and be unable to protect my son or the foster child. I will not commit a felony just because of the dumb laws. We don't know if anyone will break in but we do need to be prepared. I do have a CCW permit but it didn't matter to them at all. They kept telling me keep your gun in someone elses house. That was the stupidest think I ever heard. After I said what I needed to say they didn't blame me for how I felt. I can't protect myself or any child from a armed bad guy with a baseball bat or a glass vase. I told them off good. It felt so good defending my rights as a 2nd ammendment supporter.

The advice me and armoredman gave you is what we went through. It is no picnic. I refuse to go without my gun anywhere. I wish you the best of luck.

Old Fuff
December 21, 2008, 01:22 PM
I will not commit a felony just because of the dumb laws.

I think you were up against a Child Protective Service (CPS) regulation rather then an Arizona statute, but the net effect is the same. CPS is perhaps the most useless agency within Arizona's government, and in my experience they are both anti-gun and incompetent. I am sorry that you had to do what you had too do, but you were right in doing it.

Unfortunately its the kids that suffer. :fire:

DaveBeal
December 21, 2008, 01:34 PM
I have to agree with the powers-that-be on this one. A foster child isn't like your own child that you've raised from birth. You don't have complete knowledge about the foster child's background, state of mind, emotional stability and attitude toward guns. In this case, the possibility of accessible firearms seems a significant risk.

rbernie
December 21, 2008, 01:44 PM
Anyone see any ambiguity in the phrasing that would keep me from obtaining a permit?I think that the CHL law is not an issue for you, but you will have bigger (policy, not legal) issues with the foster/adoptive services in general.

I have to agree with the powers-that-be on this one. A foster child isn't like your own child that you've raised from birth. You don't have complete knowledge about the foster child's background, state of mind, emotional stability and attitude toward guns. In this case, the possibility of accessible firearms seems a significant risk.That sounds fine when you write it. It's another 'common sense' approach - make sure that foster kids can't come into unsupervised contact with functional and loaded firearms. But like all 'common sense' approaches, it tends to break down in practice.

Who does the home survey? Somebody who knows nothing about firearms or how to secure them.

Who reviews the application? Somebody who knows nothing about firearms or how to secure them.

The problem is that the people that set themselves up to be 'the powers that be' are not adequately schooled to adjudicate half of the issues they're asked to face. So they do the best they can with what they know (which is usually the touchy-feely side of the business) and cover their keisters on the rest by following their intepretation of a rulebook. It winds up being arbitrary, capricious, and frankly degrading to the prospective foster parents.

My own experience has been that, in the end, most foster and adoptive agencies simply impose a blanket rule that effectively disallows the presence of firearms in the house. And I will not do that.

So, sadly, my wife and I are not adoptive or foster parents despite being emotionally and financially capable and willing to be foster/adoptive parents.

wky46
December 21, 2008, 04:42 PM
Thanks all.
I have several relatives (Kentucky) that foster and each family hunts and obviously have firearms in the home. Not sure if any handguns are in any of the ones I know and I doubt any are CC .
I was told by the state that they simply demand that firearms be locked in a safe, locked guncabinet, etc. In other words, the only distinction how a foster home differs from the general public is that the foster home must keep things put up and locked. Makes sense and I'm not overly concerned about that. I did not mention CCDW.

It just seems that last statement could be construed by some as saying that foster homes are ineligable to obtain the permit. But if one reads it literally it simply states that I cannot conceal in my home nor any other foster home.

I guess I'm just wondering if I should expect any surprises when I do apply for my permit. Hopefully since my state still (so far and kinda) has a commonsense approach to gun ownership I shouldn't be too concerned but one never knows.
Kentucky seems to love emulating "progressive" states....... decades later!

My wife and I have recently been licensed to foster medically fragile children and will be accepting children soon. However since we're this far into and I'm denied a permit I guess I'll still foster but it seems that if they WERE to deny me that right based on the CCDW wording it would seem that I'd certainly be able to contest that.

.........

Phil

Mrs. Armoredman
December 21, 2008, 04:58 PM
wky46,

You and your wife have big hearts. I applaud you and your wife for taking in children that have medical needs. That is a big challenge right there.

As for a permit I don't know the laws in your state. I hope they don't deny you. Tip of the hat to you and your wife. Bless you both for what you both are doing.

Happy Holidays to both of you and everyone here at THR.

franconialocal
December 21, 2008, 06:40 PM
Not sure about where you are, but here's New Hampshire's law regarding storage of firearms.......as far as foster homes are concerned, I'm not really sure!

TITLE LXII
CRIMINAL CODE
CHAPTER 650-C
NEGLIGENT STORAGE OF FIREARMS
Section 650-C:1
650-C:1 Negligent Storage of Firearms. –
I. Nothing in this section shall be construed to reduce or limit any existing right to purchase and own firearms or ammunition, or both, or to provide authority to any state or local agency to infringe upon the privacy of any family, home or business except by lawful warrant.
II. As used in this section, "child,'' "juvenile'' or "youth'' shall mean any person under 16 years of age.
III. Any person who stores or leaves on premises under that person's control a loaded firearm, and who knows or reasonably should know that a child is likely to gain access to the firearm without the permission of the child's parent or guardian, is guilty of a violation if a child gains access to a firearm and:
(a) The firearm is used in a reckless or threatening manner;
(b) The firearm is used during the commission of any misdemeanor or felony; or
(c) The firearm is negligently or recklessly discharged.
IV. Any person who violates paragraph III shall be fined not more than $1,000.
V. This section shall not apply whenever any of the following occurs:
(a) The child has completed firearm safety instructions by a certified firearms safety instructor or has successfully completed a certified hunter safety course.
(b) The firearm is kept secured in a locked box, gun safe, or other secure locked space, or in a location which a reasonable person would believe to be secure, or is secured with a trigger lock or similar device that prevents the firearm from discharging.
(c) The firearm is carried on the person or within such a close proximity thereto so that the individual can readily retrieve and use the firearm as if carried on the person.
(d) The child obtains or obtains and discharges the firearm in a lawful act of self-defense or defense of another person.
(e) The person who keeps a loaded firearm on any premises which are under such person's custody or control has no reasonable expectation, based on objective facts and circumstances, that a child is likely to be present on the premises.
(f) The child obtains the firearm as a result of an illegal entry of any premises by any person or an illegal taking of the firearm from the premises of the owner without permission of the owner.
VI. A parent or guardian of a child who is injured or who dies of an accidental shooting shall be prosecuted under this section only in those instances in which the parent or guardian behaved in a grossly negligent manner.
VII. Licensees shall conspicuously post at each purchase counter the following warning in bold type not less than one inch in height: "IT IS IMPORTANT THAT THE OWNER OF A FIREARM SEEK FIREARM SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS FROM A CERTIFIED FIREARMS INSTRUCTOR AND KEEP FIREARMS SECURED FROM UNAUTHORIZED USE.'' A licensee failing to display this warning to the purchaser of a firearm shall be guilty of a violation.
Source. 2000, 267:1, eff. Jan. 1, 2001.

Zundfolge
December 21, 2008, 07:16 PM
I found an interesting article on the subject (in PDF form) here http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/downloads/policy-issues/Firearms_in_Foster_Homes.pdf


The wife and I had considered fostering ... after reading about the rules in Colorado it looks like we'll be taking a pass on that too :(

Colorado
The presence of firearms and ammunition is strongly discouraged in any home in which foster children are cared for. Any weapons such as firearms, air rifles, bows, hunting knives or hunting sling shots shall be unstrung and unloaded at all times when foster children are in the home and shall be stored in locked containers out of the reach of foster children. Ammunition and arrows shall be stored in separate locked containers. Firearms which are solely ornamental are excepted from the storage requirement. Weapons shall not be transported in any vehicle in which foster children are riding unless the weapons are made inoperable and inaccessible. Law enforcement professionals are exempted from the requirements of this section if conditions of their employment require them to carry weapons.


So does this kind of crap apply if you adopt? Or once you've adopted a kid does the government butt out as much as they would for your own natural born children?

Big Mike
December 23, 2008, 07:07 PM
Was a certified foster parent in Oregon. Unless the laws/regs have changed in two years, you can have weapons, but they had to be secured. Also, you could not carry concealed (with a permit/lawfully) with a foster child in your car though.

wky46
December 24, 2008, 09:00 AM
Big Mike- I didn't think about the car aspect. Thanks.

............

Phil

Old Fuff
December 24, 2008, 09:41 AM
So does this kind of crap apply if you adopt? Or once you've adopted a kid does the government butt out as much as they would for your own natural born children?

Check with an attorney or adoption agency, but I believe that if you adopt a child the kid is yours in the same respect that a natural born one would be. In the case of a foster child the state retains custody of that child.

But to adopt you have to jump through some hoops, and the same left-wing, warm & fuzzy (between the ears) social workers may refuse to certify you as qualified.

Also look into adopting through an out-of-state agency if you encounter flack in the state where you reside.

subknave
December 24, 2008, 09:49 AM
" Any weapons such as firearms, air rifles, bows, hunting knives or hunting sling shots shall be unstrung and unloaded at all times "


How do I unload my hunting knife? Please post directions.

:)

Thin Black Line
December 24, 2008, 09:58 AM
I have a folding knife with a lock built into the handle. :)

Kim
December 24, 2008, 12:59 PM
You better think twice before becoming a Foster parent. I have been told by some of my patients who are foster parents (Arkansas) that firearms are NOT allowed in the home. You will have to go have a physical exam. They will check your home out. You will have locks on cabinets and such things. It is up to you but the .gov will be in your home.

Zundfolge
December 24, 2008, 01:01 PM
Well this throws another log on the fire that is my hatred of all things government. :mad:

Deltaboy
December 24, 2008, 01:09 PM
Well then the STATE can keep them and take care of them. :cuss:

Mrs. Armoredman
December 24, 2008, 01:25 PM
Well this throws another log on the fire that is my hatred of all things government.




I hear that. I have no trust or faith in our goverment. They can't seem to take care of anything themselves. :cuss:

Zundfolge
December 24, 2008, 02:48 PM
I guess one thing that REALLY ticks me off is that rifelry can be used as a way of reaching out to youth and helping set them on the straight and narrow. Lots of life lessons there.

But the state, in their infinite wisdom, instead would rather push a political agenda against arms instead of see to it that young boys are raised into men and young girls raised into ladies.

BullpupBen
December 24, 2008, 09:39 PM
The only thing that the government is good at taking care of is itself.

jeepmor
December 24, 2008, 10:03 PM
The only thing that the government is good at taking care of is itself.

And it's industry captains. Socialism is obviously for the rich, not the common man. Our current economic issues are a keen indicator supporting this philosophy.

Damn, I wanna be a CEO with a golden parachute on the "unknown" list of benefactors to the latest debacle.

No coverup there, no, not one bit.

jeepmor

Thin Black Line
December 26, 2008, 11:59 AM
Well then the STATE can keep them and take care of them.

I understand that anger. Keep in mind, though, that all states have varying
rules on firearms in licensed foster homes.

I think as the economy gets worse and child neglect rises (due to poverty,
drugs, combination of many factors), we'll either see more kids go into care
or the state will have to ignore its own "minimum standards of care" (yes,
that is a real term) when it comes to parenting.

The state will have to leave kids in cr@ppy situtations with their own parents,
open orphanages again (larger scale of so-called "care"), or loosen some of
its standards for foster care licensing. Child welfare could find itself back
in the 1940s real quick. Depending on the state, there were large institutions
operating thru the 1980s and 1990s until they closed. Supposedly, this was
to provide kids with a more home-like atmosphere, but there were a lot of
institutional requirements and licensing standards which made them far more
costly than a foster home.

I remember one state where it cost me more to board my cat on a daily
basis than the per diem was for a child in foster care. Yet, the cheapest
institutional rate for the same child was comparable to a standard non-city
hotel room at the time.

So as the economy worsens, you might see foster home licensing standards
change to where the whole firearm issue is conveniently "ignored", but the
daily rate would be barely enough to feed and clothe the kid let alone leave
you enough to buy a box of ammo at the end of the month.

The old saying that "you don't become a foster parent for the money" has
been and always will be true. I respect them for what they're willing to do.

rmmoore
December 26, 2008, 12:16 PM
I'm no sure about that Thinblackline. After the communists took over Russia, and the economy (given what it was at the time) went south, I don't recall them "relaxing" ANY government rules for the betterment of the children, or in any of the other "Socialist" paradise's that appeared in the 20th century. For that matter, do you ever recall OUR government relaxing a program, it's authority, or rules for ANYTHING that was social in nature, to help ANYONE, other than itself? When (ok, "if") the economy tanks, good old "Uncle" isn't going to relax any rules, or leave any children in a home whether it's truly a bad situation or NOT!!!!! If there's even a hint of an issue the kids are gone, or perhaps not even that is required anymore. I have a friend in Child Services and the stories she's told me make me want to puke, or worse.

Afterall, who better to care for and indoctrinate (oops, I meant 'raise') our children the the government? Can't have all those freedom loving, liberty preserving, gun-toting zealots raising their OWN children to further this outdated idea of individual responsibility and independance (yeah, remember, OB said the Constitution was an outdated document before the election. Think about THAT). Mindless, faceless zombies for the socialist worker machine; "afterall, we're just a, another brick in the wall":banghead::fire::cuss:

rmmoore
December 26, 2008, 12:22 PM
Oops, I forgot to mention, no matter bad the economy is, no matter how bad WE are suffering, the government has all the money it needs to run things, foster homes, orphanages, ect. If they run out, well hell, they'll just print some more!!! They own the presses after all. And if it REALLY, REALLY goes to hell in a handbasket, we'll just reorganize our entire economic structure and at that point, GAME OVER boys and girls. Our history as a free Nation (if we're even really one now) is GONE, forever, poof, we've disappeared. Don't want to be a downer the day after Christmas and all, but we've GOT to open our eyes and see the forest through the trees. And this isn't a repub or demo thing, with VERY FEW exceptions, they're all republicrats as far as I'm concerned. At what point is enough, enough?

Thin Black Line
December 26, 2008, 02:24 PM
Romanian orphanages in the 1990s violated their own basic rules. It got
some media attention here in the US. The Romas looked into doing a US
style foster care system and to make child adoption legally easier. The
Russians did this, too, for a while.

I think both countries ended up stopping the adoption of their children by
foreigners...and no more TV crews in their orphanages.

Gov't can change rules and print more money whenever it likes.

If conservative gun-owners end up being 90% of potential foster care
applicants (and lobby the state as such), I think you would find gov't
responsive to this given the right circumstances.

It's kind of like the necessity speech Clooney's character gave in Three Kings.

Thin Black Line
December 26, 2008, 02:38 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081226/ap_on_re_us/meltdown_juvenile_justice

Cash-strapped states cut juvenile justice programs
By Jim Davenport, Associated Press Writer 48 mins ago

COLUMBIA, S.C. State budget cuts are forcing some of the nation's youngest criminals out of counseling programs and group homes and into juvenile prisons in what critics contend is a shortsighted move that will eventually lead to more crime and higher costs.

Tennessee, South Carolina, Kentucky and Virginia are among states that have slashed juvenile justice spending in some cases more than 20 percent because of slumping tax collections. Youth advocates say they expect the recession will bring more cuts next year in other states, hitting programs that try to rehabilitate children rather than simply locking them up.

"If you raise a child in prison, you're going to raise a convict," said South Carolina Juvenile Justice Director Bill Byars, credited with turning around a system once better known for warehousing children than counseling them and teaching them life skills.

Now, he's been asked to draw up plans to trim an additional 15 percent from a juvenile justice budget already cut $23 million, or 20 percent, since June as part of the state's effort to pare $1 billion from its $7 billion budget.

All five of the system's group homes which generally house less-violent offenders and give them more individual attention have been shuttered. Also gone are some intensive youth reform and after-school programs in detention facilities.

The story is similar in other states. Kentucky is nixing a boot camp-style program developed by the National Guard. Virginia is losing behavioral services staff and a facility that prepares children to go home after serving time, along with smaller camps and community programs. Juveniles in those programs will return to traditional correctional facilities.

"It's not like we're going to say, 'OK, let's close a juvenile detention center,' or something like that," said Gordon Hickey, spokesman for Virginia Gov. Timothy M. Kaine. "We have to reduce spending across the state, and the governor looked at suggestions and recommendations from all departments. He certainly realizes that all of these reductions have consequences. The idea is to limit the damage as much as possible."

Among the programs being cut in South Carolina is one that Lex Wilbanks, an 18-year-old arrested four years ago on drug and gun charges, credits with giving him back his future.

Before moving to the program run by Florida-based nonprofit Associated Marine Institute, which provides intensive counseling and wilderness camps in several states, Wilbanks spent four months in a regular juvenile detention center.

"When you did something wrong or you fight or you disrespect staff, they just throw you into lockdown," Wilbanks said. "They just throw you in and make them fight to survive. You're just making them a hardened criminal."

In South Carolina, only 22 percent of offenders who go through the institute's program later break the law, less than half the recidivism rate for juveniles in large state facilities, Byars said.
....
Juvenile facilities see an array of major and minor criminals. Gun, drug, sex and assault offenders may share sleeping quarters and classes with teen pranksters sentenced for disrupting schools or destroying property. Terms can last weeks or, in extreme cases, until youths become adults and are transferred to adult prisons.

Generally, less violent offenders make it to the smaller group homes, and experts say social pecking orders are easier to defuse in those settings compared to prisons where gangs try to form and fight for control.

Sheila Bedi, executive director of the Washington-based Justice Policy Institute, said housing children can cost as much as $600 per child daily. But the expenses can be much higher when children emerge hardened from big youth prisons, commit more crimes and end up in adult facilities.

"The truant comes out learning how to steal a car," Bedi said. "You cannot expect a child to come out of that situation with the ability to make better life decisions."

taliv
December 26, 2008, 03:26 PM
i haven't read any of the previous responses, but well, I for one would not want my guns going to foster homes. if you're not responsible enough or you can't afford to feed and care for your guns, then you shouldn't have that many guns. take some to a gun show and sell them to someone who will care for them.

also, it's ok to abuse some guns, particularly black ones (I AM NOT A RACIST! SOME OF MY BEST FRIENDS ARE BLACK GUNS). but you should try to clean them up a bit afterwards and replace any worn or broken parts.

but i see people all the time, particularly old widow women, who leave their dearly departed's shotguns rusting in some closet somewhere for 10 years. that should be a crime. one of these days, when we elect a real president, the ATF will focus on these sorts of heinous gun crimes. and welfare recipients will be able to get Government Eezox.

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