What is the difference between a centerfire and rimfire pistol?


PDA






kdowd771
December 28, 2008, 11:23 PM
Not really new to guns and shooting but am new to some of the terminology.

What is the difference between a centerfire or rimfire revolver/semi-auto? What are they talking about here?

Thanks

If you enjoyed reading about "What is the difference between a centerfire and rimfire pistol?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
bpl
December 28, 2008, 11:35 PM
The primer. Rimfires use a priming material poured into the cartridge casing and allowed to harden. Rimfire cartridges can only be used once. Centerfire cartridges use a removeable disc shaped primer and can be reloaded after being fired. Centerfire cartridges are generally more powerful as well.

bpl
December 28, 2008, 11:36 PM
Oh, and the firing pin strikes the outer rim on a rimfire cartridge and the center of a centerfire cartridge.

sumoj275
December 29, 2008, 12:20 AM
And the price of ammo to feed them. I just picked up a S&W M17 with a 4" brl in .22lr. Basically it feels like holding onto a 586 in .357 mag. Now I need the 586 I sold to a friend back so I have a "matched" set.

Auburn1992
December 29, 2008, 12:27 AM
Things like .17 Mach 2, .17 HMR, .22lr, and .22 Mag are rimfires - their base is a primer.

Other cartridges like the .25 ACP, 9mm, .40, .45, etc. are centerfire. They have a primer thats located in the center of the brass.

Auburn1992
December 29, 2008, 12:30 AM
http://i305.photobucket.com/albums/nn205/abrnftballlvr/center-fire.gif


http://i305.photobucket.com/albums/nn205/abrnftballlvr/rimfire.gif

kdowd771
December 29, 2008, 05:07 PM
Thanks guys. Explains it all.

unspellable
December 29, 2008, 09:59 PM
After all these technical explanations you guys forgot to answer the question. A rimfire pistol is so called because it's chambered for a rimfire cartridge, a center fire pistol because it's chambered for a centerfire cartridge.

(Sorry, just couldn't resist. Phase of the moon or something.)

BlindJustice
December 30, 2008, 12:52 PM
Another thing, rimfire firearms - the firing pin strikes
the edge of the rim - dry firing is not recommended because
without a cartridge in the chamber it could result in
metal to metal contact and resulting damage.

Centerfire firearms, depending on the action, can
usually be dry fired but some may require the use
of Snap Caps. A Snap Cap is an inert or 'dummy:
cartrdge with a hard rubber insert in place of the primer
a case and seated bullet but no powder.

Dry Firing - pulling trigger in practice with no live ammo
loaded in the firearm.

R-

If you enjoyed reading about "What is the difference between a centerfire and rimfire pistol?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!