What are your opinions on this setup?


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scythefwd
December 30, 2008, 03:57 PM
I have a C&H 204 single stage press. Lee and Lyman dies both fit.

I want to get a good bar scale, how is the Lee one?

I also want to get the Lee perfect Powder Measure. What are your opinions on this piece of equipment?

The last thing for now is a Lee autoprime II.

This is a starting setup, and I will probably be loading less than 200 rounds a year (for now, may jump a lot when I have more free time).

Later I plan on getting a tumbler, case trimmer, and chamfer tool. If you have experience with any of these tools or a recommendation + justification as to why I should look at a different tool manufacturer, please chime in. Is there any tools you think I should have that aren't covered by the items in this have/want list? Suggestions for a turret press will not be considered at this time, but maybe in the future.

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rcmodel
December 30, 2008, 04:02 PM
Regardless of what else you get, you will need a chamfer/deburring tool now.

Cases need that done the first time you load them

rcmodel

scythefwd
December 30, 2008, 04:18 PM
thanks rc, Ill grab one. Any opinions on the lee ones (the only one I am familiar with)?

That was the one thing I hated about Richard Lee's book (Modern reloading). The first chapter or two were, understandable considering the source, basically an ad for lee equipment and didn't even inform the reader of the alternatives.

rcmodel
December 30, 2008, 04:24 PM
I haven't used a Lee.

I have had an RCBS (Made by L.E. Wilson) for about 45 years, and I can't wear it out so I can try something else.

rcmodel

cochise9424221
December 30, 2008, 05:00 PM
The lee scale works but it sucks to use, it isnt dampened and takes for ever to true. Spring for the Lyman or RCBS. If you have the bucks the RCBS 1010 is great.
Lee dies are fine, their shell holders are fine, I hate the rest of thier stuff.

Dean Williams
December 30, 2008, 08:30 PM
The Lee chamfer tool works fine. Chamfering is such a quick step that even if you didn't like a certain manufacturer's item, I doubt you would resent using it.

The Lee scale is accurate and will give repeatable readings, but some people just don't like the way it's made. I've used one since they came out, and it works fine in my view, but you should go to a store to see different scales. You might like how others work better.

SASS#23149
December 31, 2008, 01:00 AM
rifle,p;istol,or both?
If rifle, a case trimmer and caliper are very necessary.
if pistol,just the caliper is necessary,trimmer is 'lesss necessary'.
chamfer tool more important for rifle,less so for pistol,but it does help.

rfwobbly
December 31, 2008, 08:59 AM
Scythe -
I also have a CH press and they are really nice pieces of equipment. Congrats. Mine is from the early 60's and still going strong. You'll be giving that to your grandchildren!

Although I love Lee dies, I can't say much for their accessories. Lee seems to have staked out the "low-cost" market segment, and you get what you pay for. I'd rather see you get good used scales and powder dispenser, rather than flimsy new Lee equipment. It's just not going to hold up or be worth anything a week after you buy it. The best proof of this is to compare the resale prices of Lee and other name brand equipment on Ebay.

While the quantities you project are low, IMHO you'll want to make up for that in absolute 100% quality. If you want mediocre ammo, then save your money and simply buy over the counter.

Just my 2 cents.

moooose102
December 31, 2008, 09:17 AM
the lee scale is not good. mine read wrong, and about blew up a rifle. lee replaced it, but i spent the extra on a hornady "M" scale. the perfect powder measure, is not perfect. it does measure extreemly accurately (even with ball powder), but ball powder leaks through it horibly. if you adjust it so it quits leaking, you can not turn the handle. however, it does work very well with extruded powders. the rest of the lee stuff i have tried is good stuff. all of my dies (except 1) are lee, along with my press and a bunch of other stuff. i will caution you about their case trimmers though. buy a cutter for each and locktite the depth gauge in place once you figure where it needs to be. if you try to use one cutter with a bunch of depth gauges, you have to set the depth every time and watch to make certain it stays where you want it to. if you just screw the depth gauge into the cutter, your cases will end up way to short to use. i found this out the hard way. when i sent the whole bunch back to lee, they said everything was "in production limits".

dagger dog
December 31, 2008, 06:00 PM
Another Nay vote for the Lee, mine was very accurate but as the previous post stated takes too long to dampen WAY TOO LONG.

RCBS 505 I think its Ohaus is my vote.

The Lee Powder Measure leaks like a seive with fine flake or ball powder, but it really shines with extruded (rod) shaped powders you don't get that herky jerky ,crunch schrunch, with every movement of the lever.

Lee dies not a problem go for it.

Chamfer tool as rc said now
You will need a caliper, I woud say now on that one too.

And most important LOADING MANUALS. go to the local gun dealers and thumb through what they have , make notes on the calibers you need and pick out the manual that fits your needs.

There are manuals for free from most of the powder manufactuers, that are very basic, but they're free for the asking.

Then there are web sites like www.stevespages.com and gunloads, for additional load data these sites usually post data that is for the more experienced hand loaders, but also have a lot of info on the process of reloading.


Plus this fine site where you can gain more info on just about every aspect of firearms , and enjoy it with others.

ranger335v
December 31, 2008, 06:33 PM
"the perfect powder measure, is not perfect. it does measure extreemly accurately (even with ball powder), but ball powder leaks through it horibly. if you adjust it so it quits leaking, you can not turn the handle. however, it does work very well with extruded powders."

The Lee (semi) Perfect measure was made for extruded powders and actually works better than any other commonly available measure for that purpose. All of the others, Redding, Hornady, RCBS, Lyman, do better with ball powders but are lousy for consistanly dispensing popular coarse extruded powders. So, we pays or money and takes our choice. Knowing what I know today, if I were in your shoes I'd get the Lee measure for now and plan to get another for the finer powders later, if you fine you really need it. And, spite of its low cost, the Lee measure will last a LOONG time! In fact, I plan to get one soon to put along side my big ol' Redding.

The biggest real problem with the Lee Safety Scale, for a low volume shooter, is that it's light and easy to push around as you use it. Cure: Don't be clumsy! Well, remember the Safety Scale was made for powder charges up to 100 gr., not weighing cases, etc.

I first bought a Lyman M-5 scale (same as today's RCBS 1010) in '65 and it's still as dead on accurate and reliable as the day I opened the box. BUT, I've NEVER used the extra capacity for reloading so any capacity over the current model RCBS 505 scale is over-kill, IMHO.

You will like a case mouth champhering tool but you can get by for a long time simply by using a pocket knife to carefully cutting a light champher to allow bullet entry without catching on the mouth.

Galil5.56
December 31, 2008, 07:04 PM
I bought a PP measure about 15 years ago to go along with my uniflow, and it is the worst piece of Lee equipment I have ever experienced. It bound up with smallish ball propellant, felt junky, and the drum was scoring the hopper. I can not believe they continue to make these things if they are still doing what I experienced. Honestly, if you are planning on only 200 rounds a YEAR, a powder measure is absolutely unneeded. I reloaded for a decade shooting 1000's of rounds using nothing but an RCBS 505, trickler, and home made dippers for volume before I got a powder measure.

I think a nice analog scale to look at is the Dillon Eliminator:

http://www.cabelas.com/prod-1/0032559215904a.shtml

Good capacity, great warranty, and it certainly looks as if Ohaus made it... Same as RCBS and others. As mentioned, the buying of good used equipment will greatly add to the pleasure of reloading, and make it rewarding, not a PITA.

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