How does this happen?


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Hoopie
January 6, 2009, 02:52 AM
Had this happen while seating some bullets the other day.

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jmabbott888@aol.com
January 6, 2009, 02:54 AM
I've had that happen when trying to put too much crimp on a bullet

ReloaderFred
January 6, 2009, 03:03 AM
It happens in one of two ways. The first is trying to seat a bullet into a neck that is too small in diameter to accept it. The other is while applying too much crimp.

You can alleviate some of this problem by chamfering the inside of the case mouths, which will facilitate the bullet feeding into the neck.

If it's caused by the crimping, then back off the die. Most rifle rounds don't need a crimp anyway, though I do crimp all rounds that are going into a tube magazine. If you're seating and crimping at the same time, the crimp may be closing before the bullet is fully seated. If the bullet is still moving after the crimp is applied, then the case neck can be pushed down and the shoulder will buckle. It's best to seat the bullets first, then crimp as a separate step.

Hope this helps.

Fred

Antihero47
January 6, 2009, 03:18 AM
If you are using the LEE seating die, make sure to check on their website on how to properly adjust them.

I use the lee, and took my 30-06 dies off and put on the .308. I just eyeballed the seating die, and when i went in for a full stroke, I got rounds like that. I checked the website and adjusted as they recommend and the seating die works perfect.

Borg
January 6, 2009, 03:35 AM
Too much crimp by the way that mouth looks.
Back your seater die out, put case in shell holder, run ram to top, screw die down to kiss case if you don't want crimp, or screw down a couple of thou to crimp.
'Borg

Hoopie
January 6, 2009, 03:52 AM
Thanks. From what i can tell it sounds like either one of these could have been my problems.

"If you're seating and crimping at the same time, the crimp may be closing before the bullet is fully seated. If the bullet is still moving after the crimp is applied, then the case neck can be pushed down and the shoulder will buckle."

"If you are using the LEE seating die, make sure to check on their website on how to properly adjust them."

I adjusted the Lee die like the pamphlet said and then tightened down the locking ring...maybe i turned the die itself when i did so. I also unscrewed the top knob about one whole turn figuring i'd start long and adjust seating depth down if i need to. Sound weird?

On a side note, I haven't used this set of dies in about a year and was disappointed to see some rust build-up. I haven't reloaded more than 200 rounds total between around 4 calibers, so i'm still learning the ropes. Is that rust normal?

evan price
January 6, 2009, 03:53 AM
Had that happen recently, your seater needs loosened up a bit. Pull the affected cases down & resize them again and they will be fine.

ReloaderFred
January 6, 2009, 12:55 PM
To remove the light coat of rust, disassemble the dies and put them one main body at a time in your tumbler and let it run for a couple of hours. After the media has removed the rust, then reassemble and load ammunition.

Hope this helps.

Fred

sqlbullet
January 6, 2009, 12:59 PM
When it happened to me, chamfering the case mouth resolved the issue. The bullets were 'grabbing' burrs and sharp edges on the case mouth which required more force to seat than the shoulder would support.

I now chamfer all case mouths before seating.

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