Counter-Bore on a Mosin M38


PDA






expvideo
January 25, 2009, 06:28 PM
I just bought a Mosin Nagant M38 (1943, nothing special), which has been counter bored. Asside from that, it is in fabulous shape! It has very strong rifling, matching serial numbers, great finish (probably refinished, because the blueing is phenominal), Izhmash markings, sharp edges on all of the wood as if the stock was brand new, etc. All the good things, none of the bad...

But can someone tell me about what happens when a rifle is re-bored? It almost looks like this rifle has never been shot and might only have been re-bored because it was in a batch of rifles that had the same thing done to them. I know that it is bad for collector value, but that is not my concern since I bought it to be a shooter. Will this hurt or help the accuracy of my new rifle?

Anyone know anything about this?

If you enjoyed reading about "Counter-Bore on a Mosin M38" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
R.W.Dale
January 25, 2009, 06:30 PM
A rifle barrel cannot be rebored unless the caliber is enlarged a couple places.

The counterbore job is usually done to allievate crown damage done from haphazard hamfisted cleaning by unwilling conscripts using steel rods

expvideo
January 25, 2009, 07:19 PM
A rifle barrel cannot be rebored unless the caliber is enlarged a couple places.
Maybe I'm using the wrong terminology. The crown or bore or whatever has been moved down about an inch. I just want to know how this will affect accuracy, since the rifling is very strong.

Hoppy590
January 25, 2009, 07:19 PM
being re bored and being counter bored are 2 different things. what you described is counter boring

counterbored keeps the original rifling, just cuts a fresh crown a little deeper into the rifle.
http://www.surplusrifle.com/shooting/1909argentinecarbine/graphics/l/counterbored.jpg
http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/DCounterbore.jpg

expvideo
January 25, 2009, 07:21 PM
counterbored keeps the original rifling, just cuts a fresh crown a little deeper into the rifle.
This is what I am talking about. Sorry, I'm not familiar with the terminology. So how does it affect accuracy?

Hoppy590
January 25, 2009, 07:22 PM
it improves accuracy when compared to the original, damaged crown.

R.W.Dale
January 25, 2009, 07:25 PM
This is what I am talking about. Sorry, I'm not familiar with the terminology. So how does it affect accuracy?


If done correctly and a good crown is reestablished it shouldn't effect accuracy at all. Other than in the context of fixing a (^#@ crown, which of course would effect accuracy

:scrutiny:

OK hows this; two moisins with barrels in similar condition one with a properly done counter bore and the other untouched are likely on a level playing field in terms of accuracy potental

expvideo
January 25, 2009, 07:30 PM
Awesome. I kind of wish they hadn't counterbored it though. Judging from the apparent unfired condition of the rest of the rifle, it looks like they probably only did it because they were doing it to all of the rifles in a certain batch. But either way, at least now I know that the rifle should shoot pretty well, since the crown is fresh and since it is a counterbore, it even has a little protection from being banged up.

Since I only bought it as a shooter and not as a collector's item, I guess this is probably for the best.

tomaustin
January 27, 2009, 08:43 PM
his report is the rifle is in great shape. should arrive within the week.

nalioth
January 27, 2009, 08:55 PM
Awesome. I kind of wish they hadn't counterbored it though. Judging from the apparent unfired condition of the rest of the rifle, it looks like they probably only did it because they were doing it to all of the rifles in a certain batch The Soviets re-arsenaled hundreds of thousands of Mosins in between wars.

You could have a "never fired since re-arsenaled" M38.

Counterboring is common on all Mosins.

If you enjoyed reading about "Counter-Bore on a Mosin M38" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!