Firs time out with new gun...


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tunaman
September 30, 2003, 02:56 AM
Well, I recently purchased a Bersa Thunder .380 and tonight took it to the range for the first time. I put 200 rounds through it and it never jammed once. One thing that I noticed was that in the first 50 rounds I shot, most of the shots were low and to the left of the target. I'm noI adjusted my aim a little bit and by the time I got to my last 2 clips (16 shots) I put up a fresh target and was able to put 13 rounds on the target with 6 of them on the black and 1 on the bullseye. I must say though that this was only at 10 ft, and its also the first time I have shot a handgun in about 5 years. So am not sure what I might be doing right or wrong. Anyway, I am looking to improve my shooting and am hoping somebody can point me to a good source on technique for shooting accurately.

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clubsoda22
September 30, 2003, 03:50 AM
the bersa is inherently accurate. It's fixed barrel means all the accuracy is shooter dependent. Practice, practice, practice. I can make a ragged hole at those ranges with my bersa, with another few hundred rounds, you can definately do the same!

PCRCCW
October 2, 2003, 08:39 AM
Actually..the Bersa needs a couple of hundred rounds through it before you should stress on the accuracy that much...the heat cycling...heating and cooling can (not always) stress relieve the barrel thats left from the machining process.
The fixed barrel design does not make it more accurate than the locked breech design...I used to think the same thing. How well the sights/slide line up with the barrel will determine your accuracy. Typically a good locked breech gun will be as accurate if not more so.
Shoot well and enjoy your gun.....good shooting.

Standing Wolf
October 2, 2003, 09:43 PM
Good for you!

10-Ring
October 3, 2003, 01:25 AM
Just makes you wanna go shooting again, huh?!? :D

Get yourself a snap cap for some dry fire practice. Place a dime (heads down) on the front sight & shoot your pistol as many times possible w/o dropping the dime. After doing this a few times at home, you'll be a pretty good shot next you hit the range :)

Waitone
October 4, 2003, 06:16 PM
Been a few years since you shot a handgun? If you were shooting right handed hitting the target low and left is the sign of a flinch. First box is where you had the problem then by the end of the session you were able to put it in the black.

Sounds like an initial flinch to me that you eventually worked out.

Dry firing as suggested with a nickel will fix the problem.

Also make sure you have good hearing protection. Noise contributes mightly to a flinch.

tunaman
October 4, 2003, 07:05 PM
Been a few years since you shot a handgun? If you were shooting right handed hitting the target low and left is the sign of a flinch. First box is where you had the problem then by the end of the session you were able to put it in the black.


Sounds like an initial flinch to me that you eventually worked out.

Dry firing as suggested with a nickel will fix the problem.

Also make sure you have good hearing protection. Noise contributes mightly to a flinch.



I will try paying attention to that the next time I get out to the range. I have already started practicing that with the nickel and as far as hearing protection goes, I bought my own set of the "deluxe" model that Turner's had for almost $40. I don't know if they were any better, but they sure were mighty comfortable! :D

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