Need to add sling swivel studs to a synthetic Ruger 10/22 stock


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Lone_Gunman
February 1, 2009, 01:42 AM
Can anyone give me tips on this? Do I need special studs, or will the same studs used on a wood stock work?

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Crosswire3
February 1, 2009, 03:57 AM
You can use standard wood studs. Just pre-drill to the diameter of the screw's center shaft.

CajunBass
February 1, 2009, 07:31 AM
Never done it on a Ruger, but I have a Remington 597. Same type of plastic I guess. Just as Crosswire said, just drill it just like you would, wood, and install the swivles. Some people put some kind of glue or epoxy on the threads, but I didn't and haven't had any problem.

Lone_Gunman
February 1, 2009, 09:53 AM
Should I use the stud that attaches to the front barrel band? or should I use the type that you have to drill a hole for?

dagger dog
February 1, 2009, 10:09 AM
Gunman,

Be carefull in spreading the front barrel band to accept the swivel stud. The first one I tried to install the stud in, was cast aluminum and it snapped into two peices.

In my opinion the rifle looks a little weird with a barrel band and a swivel stud so close together. I would go for the one designed to install in the barrel band.

After I bought a new barrel band , I filed down the front stud to a width that woud easily fit between the band. Clean the stud well and wipe on some cold blue to finish.

I don't know if the newer 10-22's come with a steel band, if so it may be cast and can also be broken easily.

AK103K
February 1, 2009, 10:18 AM
Before you start drilling, I would pull the stock off the gun and make sure there was enough "meat" where I wanted to put the studs.

Some stocks are pretty thin in a lot of places, and the standard "wood" type screw may not get enough of a bite. You may want to go with the type that have a washer and nut.

If there is enough material, the wood type work fine.

I believe I've also seen barrel bands advertised with the swivel already attached. Dont remember where, but I'm pretty sure I did.

ETA....
heres one I found....

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=631661

Lone_Gunman
February 1, 2009, 11:45 AM
Has anyone ever attacked studs to a synthetic ruger stock? If so, what product did you use?

dagger dog
February 1, 2009, 04:02 PM
Yes, I drilled one and installed the wood screw type in a MINI 14 syn stock works just like putting it in wood! UNCLE MIKES studs bought at wally world. If you have enough plastic use the wood screws, if the plastic is to thick and the screw will hit the barrel counter sink the bolt and nut type for clearance.

45crittergitter
February 2, 2009, 10:25 PM
Somebody (I forgot who) makes a conversion kit for the 77/22 synthetic stock. You cut off the factory permanent sling mounts and install conventional type swivel studs that don't rattle. Sorry I don't remember where to get the kits.

Winston_Smith
February 2, 2009, 11:31 PM
I have used the wood screws (http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=190783) and they have not pulled out but did rotate a little after installation. I even used some epoxy when installing. I pre-drilled with a 5/32 bit and did not counter sink because there is not enough material.


These (http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=705310) are what you are supposed to use. Drill through the fore end and put the machine screw with a nut on the back. The butt end always gets a wood type screw.

I have also used the stud that mounts to the barrel band, it worked but required some filing. I find them to be a little far forward for my taste.

Just give any one a shot, worst case is that you have to drill another hole in a $40 stock.

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