New to pistols can anyone recommend a good pistol to start with?


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lipadj46
February 7, 2009, 12:20 AM
I am not new to firearms but I am new to pistols (shot them a lot as a kid and teenager but have not handled one in a while). I am very informed about rifles and shotguns of all types but am out of the loop when it comes to pistols. I lived in NYC for many years and never was able to get a pistol permit there (a couple friends had a permit to have a pistol in their homes but never allowed out of the house). I moved back upstate and am taking the pistol safety course this week and will be applying for a pistol permit next week.

I have been searching around but was hoping you all could steer me towards a good first time semi auto pistol. I was thinking 9mm or .40 cal and something small enough to carry if I am able to get a CCW permit. I am on a budget so I only have $400 to $550 max to spend and of course need a holster and a spare mag. Please let me know if you have any suggestions, thanks in advance.

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R. Deckard
February 7, 2009, 12:36 AM
Glock 19. It's in your price range, small enough to carry, very accurate, cheap to feed, plenty of after market goodies to personalize it.

Deckard

lipadj46
February 7, 2009, 01:05 AM
Yes the glock 19 is definitely on the list, thanks.

sherman123
February 7, 2009, 01:10 AM
the 9mm ammo is cheaper than the .40. Where i live the local wally world has boxes of 250 .4o rds for about 69 bucks while you pay about 56 for 250 9mm rounds. I would say rent some handguns at a range that allows rentals and see which one you shoot the best since preferences are gonna vary from person to person. It most importantly depends on what fits you best. What works for me may not work as good for you and vice versa.

MaterDei
February 7, 2009, 01:17 AM
Since you're not yet looking for a CCW pistol I recommend you start with a 22.

lipadj46
February 7, 2009, 01:24 AM
I am applying for a CCW but I am not sure the chances of getting it. I grew up shooting pistols so I do know how to shoot. I just have never owned one. I have access to all my father's target pistols so I am looking for something that can be used for HD also.

gglass
February 7, 2009, 02:04 AM
The Smith & Wesson M&P 9 is your answer. There is a reason that more than 370+ LE departments have moved to the M&P as their issue weapon since it was introduced in 2006 (mainly displacing Glocks). It is an outstanding pistol at a great price.

Bill_Rights
February 7, 2009, 02:05 AM
I like the FNP-9 from FNH USA. Search THR for "FNP" for comments/reviews. Price can be < $500 and includes two extra mags (3 total) and storage case. They have a promotional "Shooter's Pack" http://www.fnhusa.com/le/promos/09shooterspack.asp (http://www.fnhusa.com/le/promos/09shooterspack.asp) that adds an outside the belt (OTB) holster and training barrel for $0. The gun is 7-3/8" long x 5" high x wide enough for a double-stack 16-rd mag, so it is not an extreme CCW. But its OK for under-jacket carry, which is 10 months of the year for you. FN also has a more compact 9mm, the FNP-9M: http://www.thehighroad.org/showpost.php?p=5295460&postcount=7. Don't know if you can get a Shooter's Pack in that model, tho.

Travis Bickle
February 7, 2009, 02:05 AM
You can get a Ruger P for even less than a Glock and they're every bit as tough and reliable. They're one of the best values on the gun market, IMO. The only problem is that Glocks and Ruger Ps are both very bulky and difficult to conceal.

I was thinking 9mm or .40 cal

.40 S&W is a good choice. It gives you all the stopping power of .357 magnum or .45 ACP with more capacity than either. Avoid the 9mm. The only reason to go with that instead of a larger caliber is that it gives you more capacity, but New York bans standard capacity mags, so you're only going to get 10+1, whether you choose 9mm or .40 S&W.

Retro
February 7, 2009, 02:11 AM
1911 is a good pistol to start with... learn the basics with a single-action pistol.. learn all the safety rules... then move onto a beretta-type DA pistol and learn about DA/SA mechanism... when proficient with SA and DA pistol, then move onto more advanced carry systems like the Glocks or Sig. If a beginner starts with a Glock without any supervision, he is likely to discharge the firearm accidently. Glock is not meant to be carried by novice... People carrying Glocks are usually very familiar with the safety rules of handgun usage.

Bill_Rights
February 7, 2009, 02:11 AM
Awwww, now, Travis, there are some +p loads and self-protection bullet types that give the 9mm some stopping power. Half the militaries and LE forces in the world wouldn't be using 9mm otherwise. All the FNP calibers are smooth-recoil and 4" barrel, so a shooter might get better follow-up shots off as well.

-v-
February 7, 2009, 02:41 AM
+1 on go to a range and rent some guns out and see what you like best. Guns are like gloves, no single glove fits two people perfectly.

Yep, the 9mm is such an anemic manstopper, I mean only most military sidearms around the world are 9mm after all. Poor schmucks. After all, everyone knows that nothing short of a .500 S&W Mag will stop a person, and even then after unloading a full cylinder CoM :uhoh:.

I'm going to mirror what everyone said, get a Glock 19. Its proven, reliable, shouldn't give you much/any trouble. If you're feeling a little more adventurous, might want to check out the Springfield XD/XDm line, in a lot of ways they are like a glock with more trimmings.

JohnnyOrygun
February 7, 2009, 02:43 AM
Stoeger Cougar, I love mine and it was about $350 before the obama tsunami hit gun prices. It's great, actually made on the exact machinery Beretta used, just now that machinery is in Turkey and labor costs less there. Mine has been 100% reliable, is not too large for CCW and is very comfortable to shoot and has a rather unique action... rotating action. So Four Thumbs Up for Cougar! IMHO

Travis Bickle
February 7, 2009, 02:45 AM
Awwww, now, Travis, there are some +p loads and self-protection bullet types that give the 9mm some stopping power.

The best 9mm personal defense rounds approach the stopping power of .40 S&W (and I never claimed otherwise), but a wider range of .40 S&W offerings are effective stoppers than 9mm. Why should he limit his ammo choices when there's nothing to be gained by doing so?

Half the militaries and LE forces in the world wouldn't be using 9mm otherwise.

The military is restricted to ball ammo and 9mm ball is an indisputably poor manstopper. I have no idea what the brass was thinking when it made that decision. Possibly the same thing it was thinking when it adopted Eugene Stoner's plastic jam-o-matic.

Police in most jurisdictions are not restricted to ball ammunition, nor are they restricted to ten round mags, so the 9mm is arguably a good choice for them.

aliasneo07
February 7, 2009, 03:07 AM
I also vote glock 19

GregGry
February 7, 2009, 03:31 AM
Glock 17 or 19. Or a xd 9. I like the simplicity of the glock, although the XD feels better in the hand.

tostada
February 7, 2009, 03:40 AM
Glock, Springfield XD, and Smith & Wesson M&P are all good lightweight compact reliable pistols you could conceal.

I'm a fan of the Glock 26. But there's no substitute for shooting them or at least picking them up.

The smallest ones (Glock 26, XD 9 subcompact, S&W M&P 9 compact) all hold 10 rounds and your pinky doesn't fit on the grip. Pearce makes pinky extensions for the Glock and XD, and I think the S&W actually comes with one small mag and one bigger mag that you can fit your pinky on.

The larger compacts (Glock 19, XD 9 standard, M&P standard) all have grips that fit your whole hand. The Glock is lighter and holds 15 rounds. The XD holds 16. The M&P is bigger and holds 17.

The point is that they're all a different weight, balance, grip angle, and feel. Even among the same brand, I love the way the Glock 26 feels with the Pearce +0 extention, and I hate the way the Glock 19 feels in my hand.

Glock has been around longer and has a simpler and more proven design. They also don't have a safety except for the trigger. XD is made in Croatia but people seem to love them. The S&Ws have interchangable backstraps to fit 3 different hand sizes.

Just try them for yourself and see which one is the most comfortable.

GLI45
February 7, 2009, 07:40 AM
Beretta 92fs.
1. Easy to shoot
2. Accurate production gun
3. High capacity
4. Very easy to breakdown and quick to clean
5. 9mm - very little recoil and cheapest ammo
6. Reliable, reliable, reliable.

I've put over 4K rds through mine without a single jam/missfeed. Finally, in the "This Counts For Nothing" department, I also think it's a much better looking handgn than all the square, boxy polymer models on the market today.

punkndisorderly
February 7, 2009, 08:51 AM
As a general rule, look to duty sized handguns and mid-range calibers like 9mm,.40 S&W, or .38 Special (or .357 which allows for .38's). The bigger the caliber and the smaller/lighter the gun, the more difficult it will be to shoot. Yes, one can learn to shoot using a .357 Snubbie or pocket auto, it's just more difficult. The smaller the pistol, the shorter the sight radius and the greater the recoil.

As far as brands and models, there just aren't many inherently bad handguns out there as long as you stick to established names. Glocks, Springfield XD's, and S&W M&P's are all good starting points in the ~$500 price range. As a 92 owner and lover, it's a great pistol and everything GLI45 said is true, but it's large grip and long trigger reach can make it difficult for those with smaller hands.

Don't overlook the .38/.357 and .44 Special wheelguns. A duty sized Ruger or S&W revolver would likely also serve you well.

Although you aren't new to firearms, taking some basic training wouldn't be a bad idea. I took a First Steps course with my wife, even though I was anything but new to firearms, and would highly recommend it. The course consisted of a few hours of basic instruction on safety, legal issues, functioning and operation of pistols and revolvers coupled with live fire with instructor provided pistols and revolvers. The course ended with shooting the Carry Permit course of fire with a pistol (Glock 19) and Revolver (S&W .38's). A little private instruction, with a professional instructor, is also a great idea as a good instructor is well versed in common mistakes and bad habits you may not realize you're doing. An hour with an instructor shrank my groups by 2/3 when I really started getting back into shooting.

lipadj46
February 7, 2009, 09:05 AM
I am taking a course on Tuesday. It is required for a pistol permit in NY. NY makes you jump through some hoops to get a pistol. Some counties it is not possible because the powers to be will not sign the paperwork unless you know somebody.

Pilot
February 7, 2009, 09:11 AM
CZ-75B ro CZ-75D PCR. Both are 9MM although versions are avialable in .40 S&W. Also, both accept the CZ Kadet Kit .22 adapter which is not only a blast to shoot, but accurate and inexpensive for practice.

benderx4
February 7, 2009, 09:21 AM
Either the CZ 75B or the Springfield Armory XD9. I would also recommend to stay with 9mm for now.

IMHO, both of these weapons offer up the absolute bang for the buck without sacrificing accuracy, reliability, and/or quality construction.

Good luck and welcome!

ojibweindian
February 7, 2009, 09:46 AM
Get a used Ruger P95 for under $300. Spend the $150-$200 left over for spare mags and as much 9mm ammo as you can scrounge.

Nothing wrong with a P95 whatsoever. Very tough and reliable pistol (on par with Glocks, IMO). You won't win a Camp Perry event with one, but you'll be able to keep all your rounds on the center or head of an approved IDPA target.

colorado_handgunner
February 7, 2009, 01:35 PM
Springfield XD may be in the top of your price range depending on where you live. If recoil is an issue, definitely go for the 9mm. I started on a 40 and had a tough time learning to handle the recoil (can now though!).

jocko
February 7, 2009, 02:11 PM
center fire: absolutely Glock 19, buy it take it out of the box, shoot it like u stole it. Probalby the simplest easiest working handgun on the market.

Most just seem to work..

Bill_Rights
February 7, 2009, 03:20 PM
Lipadj46,

Travis is dead on about 9mm vs .40S&W and so forth.

Retro has a point about learning stepwise. Its really not so much "learning" as habituating yourself so that you automatically exhibit good, safe handling without thinking about it. A handgun is just so much smaller than a long gun that there are many more ways to get into trouble with them.

I am no expert, but I prefer the "visual que" of the exposed hammer on an autoloader, especially in the beginning. You can see if the hammer is cocked back in 1/10th of a second and you know whether you've got a hot potato on your hands or not. The enclosed firing pin types of actions require an ingrained habit of remembering the last few operations you've done with the gun to know how safe it is. That's one skill you want to develop anyway, so maybe its not such a bad thing. But Retro says you should walk before you run.

Once again, I recommend the FNs. Their FNP line have exposed hammers. Although you can order DAO (double action only) models, I think that the traditional DA/SA scheme is just as safe. Just be aware that there is no "safety" per se on the FN DA/SAs. The lever that's in the same place as the 1911's thumb-down-swipe-off safety is a decocker. It drops the hammer correctly, safely without firing a round, thus taking the action from SA to DA mode. DA mode is your "safety".

hhersh
February 7, 2009, 05:13 PM
Glock 19 is probably the answer to 95% of the queries like yours. Try a bunch of handguns and buy the one you like. But again, see the first part of my response...Hersh:D

WRGADog
February 7, 2009, 05:53 PM
anything made by Springfield or Beretta. They are fun to shoot and extremely reliable. Go to the range and rent different guns to see which ones fit your hand best and which you are most comfortable shooting. Glocks are very good also just not one of my favorites. It is personal preference, so pick what ever you are comfortable with and shoot confidently.

Leaky Waders
February 7, 2009, 07:35 PM
From my experience with handguns...I think that you'd be satisified with 3 handguns your whole life.

A quality .22 - they are cheap to shoot and fun to shoot. Don't by a cheap .22 though - get a quality one that you like like a Kit gun or 617, or a ruger mark II, or any of the other well respected .22's that are commented upon by their owners. Remember - the .22 will most likely be THE gun that you shoot the most. It will probably be the gun you teach your kids or significant other on. So, it will be a family heirloom by default. Enjoy it.

A quality centerfire revolver. I favor a nice .357. You can shoot 38 specials out of it for less recoil. A revolver is a simple design that has stood the test of time. Very functional, affordable and reliable.

And lastly, a quality 1911 - it doesn't have to be expensive to be quality. There's just something about being in the 1911 club - shooting a pistol nearly 100 years old in design and still a relaible carry gun touted by many as the best choice for x and y.

Of course, I've purchased many firearms before I settled on these 3. And I have quiet a few more that I could get rid of to narrow down to these three. But, if I could only have 3...that's what it would be. This week anyways ;)

So get one of those 3 and you'll be building on something that will last a lifetime.

AK-47Ghost
February 7, 2009, 07:40 PM
Springfield Armory XD-Compact in .45ACP!!!

f4t9r
February 7, 2009, 07:51 PM
Get the XD,Beretta, or CZ. Step up a notch and get a Sig, HK or 1911.
Matter of fact anything but a Glock.:fire:

nwslug
February 8, 2009, 02:38 AM
I just upgraded my carry pistol from a 5 shot snub nose revolver. I went to the range and shot both a Glock 26 and a SA XD 9 Sub Compact. The Glock first and while I could slow fire it pretty accurately, the rapid fire (3 shot bursts) really opened up. With the XD the slow fire was dead on and the rapid fire bursts were really tight. The XD just felt better to me. I was using the extended magazine in both, the short magazine just lets my pinkie flop in the air and the Glock quickly felt brusing on my ring finger. I felt more like I was holding a 1911 with the XD - it just felt better and I could shoot it better. I bought the XD. I went with 9mm because a loaded magazine of 9s is lighter than with 45s. Carry weight as well as size is important. I'd prefer a 45 for sheer stopping power, but I can probably put more rounds in the kill zone quicker and more reliably with the 9. I really like the extra features of the XD. The Glock just seems like a stripped down model. The cocked indicator and the round chambered indicator are big plusses for me. I like the added safety of having the backstrap safety in addition to the trigger safety. One thing I found irritating was the extremely strong spring on the Glock magazine. It was very difficult to load and my thumb started getting sore. The XD was easier and faster to load - I know carry an extra magazine - but you still have to load sometime don't you. IF you had to load a magazine in a tactical situation, it would not be good to have a hard time doing so. The XD was very easy to disassemble for cleaning. Both were reasonably close in price, but at $460 for the XD with two magazines I certainly can't complain.

aHFo3
February 8, 2009, 03:00 AM
1911 is a good pistol to start with... learn the basics with a single-action pistol.. learn all the safety rules... then move onto a beretta-type DA pistol and learn about DA/SA mechanism... when proficient with SA and DA pistol, then move onto more advanced carry systems like the Glocks or Sig. If a beginner starts with a Glock without any supervision, he is likely to discharge the firearm accidently. Glock is not meant to be carried by novice... People carrying Glocks are usually very familiar with the safety rules of handgun usage.

I think I understand what you're trying to say, but the OP isn't a beginner, and any beginner, novice, or expert can have accidental discharge with any type of action whether it is SA, DA, or striker.

Learn how your gun operates, train with it, and always follow the safety rules. Even a Glock is safe if you keep your finger of the trigger until you're ready to fire.

4Freedom
February 8, 2009, 03:43 AM
Well, I am in this same situation. I have narrowed it down to S&W M&P 40 or 45 or the Springfield XDM 40. Which should I choose? I have tested the S&W M&P at the range and they are very accurate and comfortable for even a newbie shooter like me. However, I am told M&P's haver reliability issues, despsite their perfect hand design and accuracy. A Sig dealer told me M&P's are inaccurate, but my time at the range, proved him wrong. The XDM I hear is all the same as M&P, but more durable and reliable, due to the more time-tested XD design. Still in limbo which way to go on this one.

benderx4
February 8, 2009, 08:46 AM
XDm

There is a reason this gun was voted GUN OF THE YEAR! It is an amazing weapon that took the good points of several others (Glock, 1911, and HK) along the way.

And those high cap mags will not be around forever. Hurry!

txgolfer45
February 8, 2009, 10:25 PM
Lots of good choices. A lot depends upon what feels good in your hand and what points most naturally for you.

Glock 19 or 17
Sig P226
Springfield XD
S&W M&P 9
Beretta 92FS
CZ75B
H&K P30

and the list goes on.

saturno_v
February 8, 2009, 10:38 PM
lipadj46

Actually I will break away from the crowd and I strongly advice other pistols and not Glocks

If you are a beginner, you should get a gun with all the safety "goodies" external hammer, DA/SA, decocker, etc..

Once you are on a budget, caliber wise, I would stick with a 9 mm.... a bit cheaper ammo than the 40 and easier on your wrist.

Once you may consider a CCW in the future, I suggest to leave alone lesser calibers (32 ACP, 380, etc..) and start at least with the minimum service caliber, the 9 mm as we said.

A 22 is good to start learning but is seriously inadequate as defense round and you may need to buy a new pistol.

Some excellent pistols that would fit your need perfectly:

Ruger P (a bit bigger than others but extremely tough and reliable, +P rated, excellent Customer Service)

Stoeger Cougar

Bersa Thunder 9 (full size or compact) one of the best kept secret in the combat pistol world. Outstanding Customer Service, lifetime warranty, +P rated, very accurate.

All of them can be had for less than $400 and are better choices than Glock, IMHO, for a beginner.

moi_self26
February 8, 2009, 10:56 PM
*Ducks for cover

Glock is SOOOOOOO overrated. I love my Ruger SR-9(depending on the area you live in that might be in your price range)..... I am a huge sig fan though, if the price is right in your neck of the woods, that would be my selection.

WaltherPPK
February 10, 2009, 01:25 PM
I like the CZ 75 and the Springfield XDm. Both accurate and easy to shoot.

colemanw
February 11, 2009, 03:10 AM
I agree with Leaky Waders above- It was the same for me, trying many different hand guns and settling in on 1911's and Smith revolvers 38/357 (Houge Monogrips for the Smiths make the firearm an extension of your hand!)

A 1911 can be tricky at first... for your first handgun I would recommend a Smith & Wesson Model 10. Its .38 so the ammo is less pricey, its very reliable! And you can get a fairly nice one for $200-250. (They made buttloads of em)

Dr_2_B
February 11, 2009, 09:07 PM
Glock 19 would be hard to beat.

lipadj46
February 11, 2009, 09:48 PM
Thank you all for the advice. I just took the NRA pistol safety course, which is the first hoop to jump through in NY state now I need to do the rest off them (discretionary issue state). Wishing I lived in a shall issue state. At least it gives me time to research and try out a bunch of pistols.

mljdeckard
February 11, 2009, 09:55 PM
I always steer people to Glock. Even a used one. There is no job they can't do. You may decide later you want something else, but many people KEEP the Glock as they move up.

moi_self26
February 11, 2009, 09:55 PM
Thank you all for the advice. I just took the NRA pistol safety course, which is the first hoop to jump through in NY state now I need to do the rest off them (discretionary issue state). Wishing I lived in a shall issue state. At least it gives me time to research and try out a bunch of pistols.

I'm not sure if it's universally the same or not..... but when I first started, I took the NRA Protection in the Home class, and the first day was 8 hours of classroom time, and the second day was spent at the range. We were able to try a lot of different guns.

noskilz
February 12, 2009, 01:26 PM
I vote for Ruger SR9 to fit your needs. Slim grip helps with concealed carry. Full sized so easier to handle. Low bore axis so less recoil. Holds 17. Manual safety for pistola newbies. And price new is right. (Now I'm ducking.)

JImbothefiveth
February 12, 2009, 01:36 PM
The only reason to go with that instead of a larger caliber is that it gives you more capacity
Actually no. 9mm ammunition is cheaper than any other good self-defense caliber, so you can practice more. It also has less recoil, so you are less likely to get a flinch, which is very bad for accuracy.


1911 is a good pistol to start with... learn the basics with a single-action pistol.. learn all the safety rules... then move onto a beretta-type DA pistol and learn about DA/SA mechanism... when proficient with SA and DA pistol, then move onto more advanced carry systems like the Glocks
I'm not sure a glock is really "advanced". They are very simple, just remember to keep your finger and any cloth(or anything that could catch the trigger) out of the trigger gaurd.

Duke of Doubt
February 12, 2009, 01:48 PM
If the Glock said "Made in Brazil" instead of "Made in Austria" on it, we'd all be calling it a crap gun.

Delford
February 12, 2009, 03:39 PM
Nothing wrong with the Glock except the price, at least in my area. Glocks, SA XDs, H & K, Sigs and S&W M&Ps are all well north of $550. I'm a relative newbie to handguns but since Thanksgiving I've been able to shoot a S&W 1991 Police, Advanced Arms 1911 .22lr, a S&W SV9, a Glock 23 and a Ruger P345. I chose to buy the Ruger (used -~$400) and last Saturday shot 100 rounds. I like the single action visible hammer. Magazines only hold 8 rounds but if a .45 acp can't get it done the second magazine (included) ought to.
It was designed as a detective's cc gun so that's also a plus. Ammo isn't hard to get yet, you just have to call around. Winchester WB .45 acp at Wally World is $29/100. That's my $.02, not adjusted for inflation :)
Del

Travis Bickle
February 12, 2009, 09:37 PM
9mm ammunition is cheaper than any other good self-defense caliber, so you can practice more.

Wolf makes .40S&W and that's as cheap as it gets.

It also has less recoil, so you are less likely to get a flinch, which is very bad for accuracy.

Fair point, but it should be remembered that all the 9mm rounds that are effective stoppers are +p+ rounds, so there shouldn't be much recoil difference there.

jcalys
February 12, 2009, 10:25 PM
I was going through the almost exact same thing the OP was, about a year ago. Other than understanding gun safety, the best thing you can do is to shoot a lot of guns. The rental range was my best friend when I was making my decision. I probably shot 20 different guns (from j-frames and glock 26s to the S&W 500), before deciding. At the range I went to, they had a "rent one, rent them all" policy, meaning I get their whole selection for one flat rate. I ended up getting a SIG 226 in .40. It's a great gun and most important, it works for me. My buddy just got a 229 CPO in your price range, so that may work for you. Money is tight or getting tight for a lot of people, so trying before you buy the way to go.

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easyg
January 10, 2011, 10:54 AM
My recommendations:

If you think that you might someday actually carry this pistol, then avoid the full-sized service pistols altogether.

For example: Glock 17, Glock 22, Beretta 92, CZ75 B, HK USP, etc...

Yes, they can be carried concealed, but they really were not designed or intended to be carried in such a manner.
And carrying a full-sized service pistol around all day long quickly becomes a pain in the rear.

Instead, go with a compact model or a subcompact model pistol, such as these....

Glock 19
Glock 23
Glock 26
Glock 27
S&W M&P9 compact
S&W M&P40 compact
SA XD9 compact
SA XD40 compact
SA XD9 subcompact
SA XD40 subcompact
Ruger SR9 compact
Beretta PX4 Storm compact
Beretta PX4 Storm subcompact

Good luck,
Easy

easyg
January 10, 2011, 11:06 AM
nwslug:
I really like the extra features of the XD. The Glock just seems like a stripped down model. The cocked indicator and the round chambered indicator are big plusses for me.
Just so you know, Glocks also have a cocked indicator and loaded chamber indicator.

The cocked indicator is the trigger itself...
When the trigger is forward in the trigger-guard, the pistol is cocked.
When the trigger is fully to the rear of the trigger-guard, the pistol is not cocked.

And the loaded chamber indicator is the extractor...
When there's a round in the chamber the extractor will be raised slightly and can be easily felt with one's finger.

wh!plash
January 10, 2011, 11:08 AM
Umm guys, this thread was from Feb 09. I'm guessing the OP is probably not still interested in suggestions...

easyg
January 10, 2011, 11:10 AM
Umm guys, this thread was from Feb 09. I'm guessing the OP is probably not still interested in suggestions...
Yeah, I'm sure that you're right.
But who knows, it might offer advice to someone else looking for a first pistol.

9mmepiphany
January 10, 2011, 02:48 PM
While it might answer questions for some, wouldn't it be more useful to start a new thread with the question. After all, there have been many new guns introduced to the market and guns that were new when this thread started will now have a track record.

Unless the OP returns with a good reason otherwise, I think it's time to put this thread to rest>

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