Sporterized Inland M1 Carbine


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aHFo3
February 16, 2009, 06:46 PM
I was given an M1 Carbine sporter. The work includes:
Military sights removed
High Gloss Rebluing
Manlicher Stock by Fajen
Receiver Mounted Browning Scope

It is very clean, and hardly used.

Is there much appeal to these altered Mil-Surplus Carbines?

Any idea of the value?

I'll get pictures up as soon as I get it back from my brother

Thanks

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Gordon
February 16, 2009, 06:52 PM
Atleast $500 and more likely $600

targshooter
February 16, 2009, 07:27 PM
In the 1960s a fellow named Blish did some exemplary Carbine sporterization. All custom. I would expect this would be worth a bit more than average to someone. There were numerous OTC sporterized carbines available, some well done and others being hack jobs. I believe the hack jobs would be of value only as parts guns or as quite reduced cost plinking rifles. A sporterized version that was well done would be worth about what a used Ruger Deerfield goes for where you live, at least in my opinion, as the Ruger .44 magnum carbines are the direct competition for hunting (and better by virtue of caliber). I do remember R&S Auto Stores offering a fairly well done carbine conversion like you describe. It would fit the Ruger competitor class IMO. I did see one Blish carbine as a kid, and the local gunsmith wanted a lot of money for it, the rifle being more expensive than any of the high end hunting rifles of that era. I believe, IIRC, that Blish placed his name on the rifle somewhere. It was beautifully executed.

MAURICE
February 16, 2009, 07:37 PM
I saw something like this at a gun show in Tupelo, MS yesterday. I didn't get a good look at it, but the price was only $300, IIRC. I didn't bother looking at it for more than a second because my initial impression was Bubba got a hold of it (and I was broke- mostly looking for G23 and 32 mags). Now I wish I had taken a closer look.

The Deer Hunter
February 16, 2009, 07:50 PM
I think it would be a fine firearm as long as it was re finished well. I have seen a couple of nice sporters, and even a really nice M1 Garand similar to the carbine you have.

FWIW: I am in the market for a small, semi automatic rifle, and something like that would fit the bill quite nicely.

Trebor
February 16, 2009, 07:58 PM
There's no particular collector interest in these.

If it was nicely done, you might get a decent price for it from someone who wants something a little different. But, in general, I'd say a really nice original example would be worth more then a sporterized example.

SlamFire1
February 16, 2009, 11:19 PM
Would have to see it, or a picture of the carbine, to determine the work, and the quality of work.

Kuhnhausen's book of the Garand shows a sporterized Garand that would be worth more than a CMP rack Grade Garand, maybe as much as a Collector's grade. Being somewhat familiar with custom gun work, I expect the original cost of the custom work performed on that rifle was in the range of thousands of dollars.

So, if your carbine shows several thousand dollars of work, someone might be willing to pay $500/600 bucks for it.

The current best prices for original M1 carbines is around $500.00 from the CMP. Shooters who like military items will pay real money for an all original military rifle. Those people will not pay much money for a "sporterized" military rifle.

If you cannot interest those people in buying your Carbine, then you have to compete for people who want it as a hunting rifle, or as a plinker.

There are lots of very reasonably prices hunting rifles and plinkers.

aHFo3
February 17, 2009, 03:33 PM
Slam, I'm with you, I wish it was an original carbine. Oh well. The reblue is a bit glossier than I prefer. Free is free, though, right?

I'll try to get pics up soon.

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