marksman/sniper tips and tricks


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sprice
February 17, 2009, 07:28 PM
I've been studying up on marksmanship for hunting and offensive/defensive carbine and long riflemanship skills. I've learned some things that will make me a better shooter- but the books are outdated and I only had 2 books to begin with. Could all of you help me out and teach me some new tips/tricks and or escape, evade, and survive skills? If you tell me some I'll try and use them this summer on a weeklong survival trip.

Thanks again- Sprice

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Maelstrom
February 17, 2009, 07:36 PM
Hold the gun steady.

Duke of Doubt
February 17, 2009, 07:36 PM
sprice: "but the books are outdated"

I've obtained useful marksmanship and scouting information from books hundreds of years old. Some of the best marksmanship and scouting tomes were authored in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

sprice
February 17, 2009, 07:45 PM
thanks for "hold the gun steady" haha and the outdated books part was because i was also wondering if there was anything new. I already said i "learned some new things that will make me a better shooter." also; things change.

Zangetsu
February 17, 2009, 07:47 PM
I've obtained useful marksmanship and scouting information from books hundreds of years old. Some of the best marksmanship and scouting tomes were authored in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Got some titles? I'd be interested in checking them out if possible.

sprice
February 17, 2009, 07:52 PM
zangetsu is right: refer some books to us!

gotime242
February 17, 2009, 07:58 PM
If its cold out, put snow in your mouth so whatever you are shooting at doesnt see your breath.

:D

Duke of Doubt
February 17, 2009, 07:59 PM
Zangetsu: "Got some titles? I'd be interested in checking them out if possible."

Almost too many to start a list. Best idea is to explore your local antiquarian book dealer's stock, particularly in older, rural areas, for older hunting and related literature. I've collected in that genre for some time (it's easy in rural Maine; we hunt, we shoot, we have lots of guns, we read, and we have lots of time in winter to read).

But I'll offer one title/group of titles:

My favorite introductory handgun book is Lt. Chas. Chapel's "Simplified Pistol and Revolver Shooting" (1950). Lt. Chapel wrote an excellent series of gun books in the early twentieth century on a wide variety of gun topics. I've found them concise, accurate and helpful to read.

marsofold
February 17, 2009, 08:10 PM
Aim carefully at the target.

Jeff White
February 17, 2009, 08:14 PM
The only thing new in sniping is the equipment used. The fundamentals haven't changed much since sniping began. I'm going to move this thread to rifle country where you'll get better answers.

gotime242
February 17, 2009, 08:26 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKAuP9_Ha8Y

black_powder_Rob
February 17, 2009, 08:28 PM
aim small, miss small

blkbrd666
February 17, 2009, 08:33 PM
One shot, one kill? :D

taliv
February 17, 2009, 08:46 PM
i think "escape/evade/survive" skills are a good bit outside the scope of THR. (if you want to discuss those, hit the 'aps' link in the upper right)

marksmanship however, is definitely what we're about, but the internet is sorta a suboptimal media for marksmanship instruction.

there are some good places to go get training on both topics though.

my advice would be to ask more specific questions in areas you think you're having problems.

burningsquirrels
February 17, 2009, 08:51 PM
1. Bring Chuck Norris.

/thread. :D

bfoosh006
February 17, 2009, 09:43 PM
http://www.snipershide.com/forum/ubbthreads.php?ubb=postlist&Board=20&page=1, .....might help...

Art Eatman
February 17, 2009, 11:12 PM
The better you are at hunting, the better you are at escape and evasion. The main thing at E&E is to always find the hunter before the hunter finds you; figure out where he's headed and then don't be there. You want to be behind him, so if you decide to shoot, your life is easy and his isn't. People are a bunch easier than coyotes or trophy bucks.

Self control. The closer you can get yourself to being about halfway bored, the less of a problem from adrenalin. Then you can focus on trigger control, and anticipating where the sights will be, 0.2 seconds after you tell your trigger finger to Do It. Between heartbeats, of course.

WNTFW
February 17, 2009, 11:18 PM
The latest book by
Col. John Plaster - The Ultimate Sniper--New Edition

also some of his videos are on youtube.

.38 Special
February 17, 2009, 11:19 PM
Then you can focus on trigger control, and anticipating where the sights will be, 0.2 seconds after you tell your trigger finger to Do It.

I'd submit that telling your trigger finger to "Do It" eliminates any possibility of hitting, sheer luck excepted. But then, I don't know anything about being a "sniper", so I'll just keep my mouth shut. :p

REDMASTA
February 18, 2009, 01:49 AM
Don't miss or just bring Chuck Norris as said above, either works

rangerruck
February 18, 2009, 02:28 AM
"survivle rifles" are generally all overrated and not necessary; a good , reliable, long bbl., 22 pistol, slim bbl, black on black, is allways good, light, takes up little room, easy to carry, and you can carry a ton of 22 rounds.
A good all around book for woodsmanship/patrolling stuff? got two for you.
go to a army surplus store, and get a FM (field manual) on Mountaineering, and the Ranger handbook. Ever since I got out of the Army, i have allways tried to keep at least one Ranger handbook handy.
It starts out with the Ranger Creed, and then is followed by Rogers' general orders, written in 1755, still aplicable today, for anyone.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rangers_Standing_Orders

the so called 'fictional version' here is most common, and shortest.

rangerruck
February 18, 2009, 02:41 AM
Oh yeah, my best advice , when first going into the woods, by yourself, or even with others; get away at least a 1/4 mile from your start point, 1/2 mile is better. While in the Army, when leaving the forward line, or RP, or defensive post, we would try to travel at least 1 hill or valley away, to get away from the sound, light, and noise of the place we just left. Then sit down, be still, shut up, and listen, I MEAN REALLY LISTEN, for about 15 minutes. Don't think about anything, what you need to do , where you are going next, nothing. Just shut up and listen. Take it all in. What's the temps like, what's the wind like, where is it coming from , where's north, are there any lights, animal sounds, people sounds, vehicle sounds; absorb your environment for 15 minutes. then as you move, take notice of anything at all, that did not sound or smell like that first 15 minutes, and either investigate it, or if evading, move away from it.
Lastly, if you have to go back, look behind you every 15 or 20 steps, and look at the environment, and pic out a peculiar rock, tree, etc., to give you reference. put a small stone in your pocket, or tie a knot in a piece of string, every 70 steps you take with one leg, left or right, you choose. Generally, unless you are allways on flat ground, or are very long legged, this will be about 100 meters.
My pace count for 100 meters is 62 steps, with every left foot, on flat ground.

Dimis
February 18, 2009, 02:52 AM
WOW do i have a list of stuff for you lol
to start get the basic military manuals most have been updated as rescent as 2003 do a search and you can find a bunch of places to download for free (http://stevespages.com used to have them)
then id go with some stuff about Carlos Hathcock especialy HIS book White Feather or Carlos Hathcock:USMC Scout Sniper
if you want i can e-mail you a list of Great books to try out but its WAY to many to post because i just tried copying and pasteing it and it wouldnt let me
there is also a bunch of videos and even computer software that will help you ALOT im no expert sniper but i used to have groups of 4-5 inches at 100 yards and now im within an inch most of that is just practice but alot of the technique was learned from these books
also go through rifle safty and training courses a good range instructer will help you 1000000000 times more than trying to figure it out on your own

C-grunt
February 18, 2009, 04:29 AM
Kentucky windage. Im serious.

I never got into sniper school when I was in. They gave it to a new Private because I got to go to Javeline Missile school, which was all but completely useless in a mechanized unit.

But I did get a DMR rifle in my 05 tour. The snipers in y unit would make fun of my "baby sniper rifle", but I did best their longest shot by a good 100 meters. HA!!!

Art Eatman
February 18, 2009, 09:45 AM
.38 Special, when you shoot any firearm, isn't your brain giving an order to your trigger finger? :)

halfded
February 18, 2009, 10:32 AM
Visualize the pink mist... You have to want the pink mist... :neener:

vicdotcom
February 18, 2009, 10:35 AM
Nevermind... deleted for the High Road

jbkebert
February 18, 2009, 10:50 AM
Nothing takes the place of practice with your rifle. We place blue rock at varying distances from 50-600 yards and practice. Sure you need to know how your rifle will preform at 100 yards. You also need to learn to judge distance. If you have a range finder. Go out into the woods, fields, ect find a target estimate the range. Then verify with you range finder. SERE training is 90% mental and common sense. It pays great dividens to study up on various survival techniques. But unless you pratice them all the reading in the world will not mean a thing.

usmc1371
February 18, 2009, 01:06 PM
Master the basics:
learn natural point of aim
learn to get into solid shooting positions quick like sitting, knealing, prone. get a good shooting sling and learn how to use it right. use a rest any time you can. Shoot your chosen weapon alot it will help you learn the trigger feel this in important. If your gun has a good clean trigger pull lucky you it will make accurate shots easyer. If it has an M16 type trigger learn to "stage" the trigger ie squeez all the slack you can, breath again and finish the pull when the sights are back to your natural point of aim. I like to shoot with both eyes open but thats just me. Lots of dry fire practice will help with our trigger pull and sight picture. Front sight should be clear, target should look a little blury so should the rear sight. Thats all I can think of off the top of my head, feel free to ask spacific questions.

icebones
February 18, 2009, 01:22 PM
+1 on the kentucky windage:D

how about setting up a game of cat and mouse?

like the sniper instructors do or the E&E instructors do for pilots in training?

go in the woods somewhere, and have about 5-10 buddies come looking for you. but take it seariously, and dont let it become a game.

really think about the tracks you are leaving, and your camoflauge. A small part of a snipers training is actually shooting, many, many, hours are spent on camoflauge, moving without being seen, and escape & evasion. small things, like waiting for the wind to blow across a field of tall weeds before you belly crawl across it so you wont attract attention.

same goes for moving on dead leaves in the woods.

The human eye is best at detecting movement, solid colors and geometric shapes. do your best to eliminate all of these from your person, and your gear. also remember your outline. even if its pitch dark outside, you will be seen if you walk along the edge of a hill and your outline is visible aganst the skyline.

hell i know if i tryed that cat-and-mouse make believe E&E with with my buddies i would climb in a tall tree and watch them leave empty beer cans all over my frekin woods:evil:

pgeleven
February 18, 2009, 02:04 PM
Could all of you help me out and teach me some new tips/tricks and or escape, evade, and survive skills?

anyone else smell a Gecko? :uhoh:

.38 Special
February 18, 2009, 07:01 PM
.38 Special, when you shoot any firearm, isn't your brain giving an order to your trigger finger?

Sort of. My brain tells my finger to begin a slow steady squeeze. Somewhere during that squeeze -- at a point unknown to me -- the gun will discharge. This is as opposed to "Do It" which sounds to me like a great way to yank the gun off target.

But I know that you know that. I just wanted to use the opportunity to get in another crack about the "sniper rifle" crowd. Sorry. :p

codybrown
February 18, 2009, 07:28 PM
Practice......pick a rifle that you like and learn how to shoot it well.

DRYHUMOR
February 18, 2009, 07:54 PM
If you shoot late,

fabricate a hood/cover that will cover your head and the rear of the scope completely.

This will allow any available light coming into the scope to reach your eye, and give you longer shooting times.

Lovesbeer99
February 18, 2009, 08:20 PM
jarheadtop.com - get his books. They are geared toward camp perry marksmenship. Great stuff.

Old Guard Dog
February 18, 2009, 08:22 PM
Make sure that snow you put in your mouth isn't yellow snow!!

gotime242
February 18, 2009, 09:40 PM
lol^

Davo
February 18, 2009, 10:21 PM
Practice as you will compete. Shoot alot. Read. Practice at home-dryfire etc.

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