How many know what AR really stands for?


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W L Johnson
February 20, 2009, 11:56 AM
The letters AR (as in AR-10,15 etc..) get toss around so much I wonder how many people know what the letters stand for. It's not what a lot of people seem to think.

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Jorg Nysgerrig
February 20, 2009, 11:57 AM
Antelope Revolver? Are you going to reveal that it really isn't just the first two letters of Armalite?

vulturez
February 20, 2009, 11:58 AM
I always thought it was for Armalite who first made the rifle.

possum
February 20, 2009, 11:58 AM
armalite
automatic rifle?
awful rifle?
always right?
awesome rifle?
almighty rifle?

since we are having a quiz here, what is offset?

W L Johnson
February 20, 2009, 12:01 PM
Armalite it is, but a lot of people think Automatic Rifle.

vulturez
February 20, 2009, 12:03 PM
I also believe the original was the AR-180.

W L Johnson
February 20, 2009, 12:05 PM
I also believe the original was the AR-180.

No, the AR-180 is the newer version of the AR-18 which came out after the AR-15. It's now being produced as the AR-180B.

lucky_fool
February 20, 2009, 12:23 PM
Wait, I thought it was Arkansas...

Txhillbilly
February 20, 2009, 12:27 PM
For alot of people it stands for Almost Reliable the way they cut them down. But I truly enjoy all my AR's. And for all the guys that can't stop adding accessories to their AR's-it stands for Almost Ready!:neener:

Big Bill
February 20, 2009, 12:32 PM
Armalite Rifle or Arkansas

JohnMcD348
February 20, 2009, 12:34 PM
WOW! Deja Vu. I was just talking to a friend on the phone a little while ago about this very thing in relation to cosmetics and reality when it came down to the Clinton era. He thought AR stood for Assualt Rifle and I had to give him a short history lesson on Armalite Industries and Eugene Stoner.

Spyvie
February 20, 2009, 12:47 PM
I don't think it stands for the first two letters in Armalight, I think it's an acronym for Armalight Rifle

Small difference I know...

LaEscopeta
February 20, 2009, 12:48 PM
AR = Armalite.

Remember the first AR series rifle the company sold was the AR-5, a break down bolt action rifle the US Air Force bought as a air crew survival weapon. There was nothing Automatic about the AR-5.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AR-5

CoRoMo
February 20, 2009, 12:49 PM
...a lot of people think Automatic Rifle.

Really??? A lot of people don't own or know much about the AR either. Maybe they are all of the same group.

rcmodel
February 20, 2009, 12:50 PM
Gene Stoner designed it & Armalite introduced the prototype AR-10 in 1956.

The AR-15 came along in 1958.

Then, Armalite sold the patent rights to the AR-10 and AR-15 to Colt in 1959, and needed another rifle to sell.

The AR-18 was not a Stoner design.
It was designed by Arthur Miller and introduced in 1963.

What followed was manufacture and sales of AR-18's by Howa of Japan, which included redesigning it to become the AR-180. Then they stopped the export of them and production was moved to England in 1974.

In 1984, Armalite was broke and the company was sold to Elisco Tool Manufacturing Company, of the Philippines.

In 2001, Eagle Arms introduced the AR-180-B.

rc

Jorg Nysgerrig
February 20, 2009, 12:51 PM
I don't think it stands for the first two letters in Armalight, I think it's an acronym for Armalight Rifle

How does that work with the AR-17 then?

rcmodel
February 20, 2009, 12:54 PM
A very convincing point!

rc

Duke of Doubt
February 20, 2009, 12:54 PM
Almost Replaced

Bill2e
February 20, 2009, 12:55 PM
American Rifle

mgregg85
February 20, 2009, 12:55 PM
I always thought automatic rifle too, good to know the real reason I guess.

ny32182
February 20, 2009, 12:56 PM
I've always heard either "ARmalite", or "Armalite Rifle".

scottgun
February 20, 2009, 12:56 PM
I just asked Diane Feinstein and she confirmed that it stands for
assault rifle :barf:

W L Johnson
February 20, 2009, 01:51 PM
How does that work with the AR-17 then?

AR-17 was a shotgun, AR-5 was a bolt action, AR-50 is a single shot .50cal (I think bolt action). My AR-24 is a 9mm handgun. And I think they are suppose to come out with a AR-26 .45 ACP handgun.

Odd thing in that they don't call their current AR-15 an AR-15 but a M-15 because Colt had bought the rights to the name when they bought the design.

Prion
February 20, 2009, 02:29 PM
Yeah? Well the AR in ARLover still stands for automatic rifle. So take that!!! Kidding.....good to know.

wyocarp
February 20, 2009, 02:52 PM
Almost Reliable is overstating it a little isn't it?

Yes I own some, but they sit in the safe because I like guns that go bang every time or darn close to it.

D94R
February 20, 2009, 03:22 PM
I just asked Diane Feinstein and she confirmed that it stands for
assault rifle
Took 22 posts for that one to come out? That is almost always the answer any uneducated anti give.

blkbrd666
February 20, 2009, 03:54 PM
Arkansas...Adobe Reader...Annual Report...Army Reserve...American Revolution...Arizona Republic...Allergic Rhinitis...Army Ranger...Anal Retentive...Acoustic Research...American Racing...Atlantic Records...Arista Records...Armalite...Airborne Reconnaissance...Active Radar...Armor Rating...Alabama Railroad...Artificial Resuscitation...Advanced Retardation...Adaptive Receptor...Argon...Animal Rights...

...plus, it's what pirates say..."ARrrrrr" Matey!


Geez, see what thinking about a cold beer on Friday does to ya???

ArmedBear
February 20, 2009, 03:56 PM
From Arrested Development...

A psychological counselor who is part psychoanalyst, part therapist.

http://the-op.com/images/episode/303/000051_sm.jpg

f4t9r
February 20, 2009, 03:58 PM
Always Ready = AR

W L Johnson
February 20, 2009, 04:06 PM
American Rifle

I think I like that, it fits. (the rifles of course)

Duke of Doubt
February 20, 2009, 04:12 PM
blackbird666: "...plus, it's what pirates say..."ARrrrrr" Matey!"

ARRRR! Be ye one of ye Somali pirates, of ye too-short ladders and insufficient arrrrrrr-mament?

rogertc1
February 20, 2009, 07:11 PM
Sounds like a bunch of middle school kids...LOL

It means "ARmalite model 15"
AR-15 was the original name for what became the militarily designated M16.

Prince Yamato
February 20, 2009, 07:32 PM
I thought it was "Armalite Rifle" as well.

Claude Clay
February 20, 2009, 07:50 PM
Animal Rights

____________________

save California from itself

MT GUNNY
February 20, 2009, 09:34 PM
AR-15 (for Armalite model 15, often mistaken for Automatic Rifle or Assault Rifle) is the common name for the widely-owned[9] semi-automatic rifle which soon afterwards became the fully automatic M16 and M4 Carbine assault rifles, which are currently in use by the United States military. AR-15 was the original name for what became the militarily designated M16, the assault rifle first used by the U.S. in the Vietnam War. The name AR-15 is now used almost exclusively to refer to the semi-automatic (commercially available) civilian version(s) of the M16 and M4 assault rifles.

All standard AR-15 rifles accept detachable magazines of widely varying capacities, and have a pistol grip that protrudes beneath the stock. AR-15 rifles are highly configurable and customizable, and are commonly fitted with several accessories, including bipods, bayonet lugs, folding or collapsing butt stocks, threaded barrels for the attachment of a flash suppressor or other accessories, and a Picatinny rail in place of the fore grip for the attachment of vertical grips, flashlights, laser sights, telescopic sights, and other accessories.

The AR-15 is based on the 7.62 mm AR-10, designed by Eugene Stoner of the Fairchild ArmaLite corporation.[10] The AR-15 was developed as a lighter, 5.56 mm version of the AR-10. The "AR" in AR-15 comes from the ArmaLite name. ArmaLite's AR-1, AR-5, and some subsequent models were bolt action rifles, and there are shotguns and pistols whose model numbers also include the "AR" prefix.[10]


Colt AR-15 Sporter SP1 CarbineArmaLite sold its rights to the AR-10 and AR-15 to Colt in 1959. Colt marketed the AR-15 rifle to various military services around the world, including the U.S. Air Force, Army, and Marine Corps. The AR-15 was eventually adopted by the United States military under the designation M16. However, Colt continued to use the AR-15 trademark for its semi-automatic variants (AR-15, AR-15A2) which were marketed to civilian and law-enforcement customers. The original AR-15 was a very lightweight weapon, weighing less than 6 pounds with empty magazine, though later heavy-barrel versions of the civilian AR-15 can weigh upwards of 8.5 lbs.[11][12]

Today the civilian-model AR-15 and its variations are manufactured by many companies and have captured the affection of sport shooters and police forces around the world due to their accuracy and modularity. (Please refer to the M16 for a more complete history of the development and evolution of the AR-15 and derivatives.)

The trademark "AR15" or "AR-15" is registered to Colt Industries, which maintains that the term should only be used to refer to their products. Other manufacturers make AR-15 clones marketed under separate designations, although colloquially these are sometimes also referred to by the term AR-15.

Ohio Gun Guy
February 20, 2009, 09:59 PM
AK = Almost Krap (Krap spelling is russian) :evil:

chuckusaret
February 20, 2009, 10:46 PM
Almost Reliable is overstating it a little isn't it?

No, there are many sport rifles on the market that are more accurate, more reliable, better looking and cost one fourth of what the dealers demand for the so called assult weapons.

W L Johnson
February 20, 2009, 11:19 PM
IMHO if people would leave their AR's largely alone, in other words stop hanging 20 pounds of useless crap on it, I think the AR-10/15's are a fine looking rifle, I don't find them ugly at all. Don't get me wrong, some accessories are just fine and needed in some cases, but some people way way over do it.

Some people treat these like some kids do their cars, they take a 10,000 dollar car and then put 30,000 dollars of useless stuff on it just to make it sound and look like crap and in the end it does no more than my 15 year old escort, which just had it's first repair by the way this summer (radiator wore out) .

All IMHO.

crazy-mp
February 21, 2009, 12:32 AM
Nancy Pelosi says it stands for Almost Removed, from your hands (as she crosses fingers and shouts I HOPE!!!!)

My reaction :barf::cuss::barf::cuss::banghead::banghead:




:fire:

Jorg Nysgerrig
February 21, 2009, 12:33 AM
I certainly hope you aren't suggesting your reaction is to shoot a politician.

mongo4567
February 21, 2009, 12:33 AM
Armed for Rodents sounds about right to me... :)

Ratshooter
February 21, 2009, 12:38 AM
AR = ALMOST a RUGER

PAC 762
February 21, 2009, 12:42 AM
I always thought the "AR" stood for "anally raped". I thought it described colt's pricing policy. :confused:

WTBguns10kOK
February 21, 2009, 05:26 AM
Angry Redneck

Prion
February 21, 2009, 06:23 AM
Wyocarp, if they sit in the safe because you don't like them why not sell them. Good time to do so.

Geno
February 21, 2009, 06:29 AM
Well, if you're a pirate, it's an incomplete sentence:

Ar... :confused:

Arg! :D

<<smirking>>

7mmsavage
February 21, 2009, 06:33 AM
Duncan Long's, "The Complete AR15 / M16 Sourcebook, What Everyone Needs to Know" says AR stands for Armalite Rifle. I don't know if it's correct, but that's what it says.

moooose102
February 21, 2009, 07:22 AM
I certainly hope you aren't suggesting your reaction is to shoot a politician.
politicians are not worth shooting. their payday will come soon enough when they die and the devil greets them with a huge smile at the gates of hell!
as far as the "AR" thing, i always thought is was what the first soldier said 10 seconds after it was issued to him. "ar, what a piece of junk, give me my rifle back!". LOL. it is a good thing they have come a long way since the 50's!

ar10
February 21, 2009, 07:42 AM
The first AR was the AR10B. I believe the actual "A" blew up during the SA trials, but that one still had the upside down trigger. The AR10 came later. The 10B is still in active service in Africa.

Interceptor_Knight
February 21, 2009, 08:05 AM
Always Reliable...:cool:

You have to abuse your AR for it not to be reliable. If you do not clean and lube it, you deserve what you get...:)

W L Johnson
February 21, 2009, 10:03 AM
The first AR was the AR10B. I believe the actual "A" blew up during the SA trials, but that one still had the upside down trigger. The AR10 came later. The 10B is still in active service in Africa.

The AR-10B (note the B) is the modern reproduction of the original AR-10. It's even got the the Pegasus Logo instead of the lion.

here a link
http://www.armalite.com/ItemForm.aspx?item=10B&Category=f4bd4a13-55d1-41aa-aea0-49488ec48776

ar10
February 21, 2009, 10:44 AM
The AR-10B (note the B) is the modern reproduction of the original AR-10. It's even got the the Pegasus Logo instead of the lion.


You're right. I went back and looked it up. I wasn't sure when they actually changed the charging trigger.

W L Johnson
February 22, 2009, 12:31 PM
You're right. I went back and looked it up. I wasn't sure when they actually changed the charging trigger

Wasn't it Colt that moved the charging handle from under the carry handle to behind it?

ar10
February 22, 2009, 01:34 PM
I think what happened is Armalite forced a change of barrels on the AR-10 to make it lighter. During the SA trials the AR barrel blew up. Afterwards Armalite was allowed to resubmit and was scheduled for a new set of trials but by that time politics set in and I think colt won the contract.

crankshop1000
February 22, 2009, 02:47 PM
Ammo-Rexic after the puny .223 ammo.

jpwilly
February 22, 2009, 03:06 PM
Ammo-Rexic after the puny .223 ammo.

Good one!

W L Johnson
February 22, 2009, 05:50 PM
I think what happened is Armalite forced a change of barrels on the AR-10 to make it lighter. During the SA trials the AR barrel blew up. Afterwards Armalite was allowed to resubmit and was scheduled for a new set of trials but by that time politics set in and I think colt won the contract.

I think it was new light weight barrel that hadn't been tested yet and despite E. Stoner's protests they shipped it off to the army tests anyway. Stoner had a fit from what I hear. That's what you get when you don't pay attention to the designer who knew the weapon better than anyone. :banghead:

sturmgewehr667
February 22, 2009, 10:43 PM
it should be SHG for "should have had a garand" :neener: lol, jk

DRYHUMOR
February 23, 2009, 06:42 AM
Acceptable Recoil, after all, it was first in the .223

Of course, there is the Almost Robust.

ar10
February 23, 2009, 06:45 AM
I still love the Armalite. I used to shoot my M1 all the time at the 300 yd range until I bought the AR10B. I'm also a hopeless iron sight fanatic and love shooting at long ranges, I've even had to file down the front sight so I can at least see the bull at 300. With the reloads I use the AR is just as accurate or more so then many of the other rifles I've seen using the same distances.
It's also interesting that when I scrounge for brass at the end of my shift I see hardly any .223 brass at the 200/300 ranges, and we have a lot of .223 shooters. At the 150ft range there are probably equal numbers of handgunners and AR15 shooters. That tells me which rifles are actually used at longer ranges.

LaEscopeta
February 23, 2009, 08:40 AM
OK here is a bonus question. Which military was the first to use the AR-15 in war, and which war?

sturmgewehr667
February 23, 2009, 04:25 PM
no military has used the AR-15 because the AR is a civilian version of the M16

makarovnik
February 23, 2009, 07:07 PM
Assault Rifle. Oh sorry, I just remembered we aren't supposed to use that term anymore.

Armalite it is then.

Jim K
February 23, 2009, 07:21 PM
Dick Boutelle, the VP of Fairchild Engine and Aircraft Co. and the power behind Fairchild's Armalite division, said it stood for ARmalite.

The R certainly doesn't stand for rifle since the first product for public sale was the AR-5, a semi-auto shotgun. The second was the AR-7, the little .22LR "survival" rifle that could be stored in its own stock and would float. It has survived (though heaven knows why) through several manufacturers, and AFAIK is now being made by Henry.

Jim

Duke of Doubt
February 23, 2009, 07:30 PM
LaEscopita: "OK here is a bonus question. Which military was the first to use the AR-15 in war, and which war?"

Commercial AR-15 rifles were issued to United States Army Special Forces beginning in the spring of 1964. One guess where.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M16_(rifle)

rugerman07
February 23, 2009, 07:48 PM
Armalite??? No, that's wrong. AR stands for:

AMERICAN RIFLE

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