30-30 or 45/70


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Rob96
February 23, 2009, 06:41 AM
I want a lever action rifle for hunting. I will be hunting boar, Whitetail and possibly an occasional Mule deer hunt and a very remote chance at Elk. Which would you choose and why?

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huntershooter
February 23, 2009, 07:15 AM
The .45/70 (with heavy cast bullets) would be preferable to the .30/30 on Elk.
The .30/30 having a "better"/flatter trajectory, good for the other game you mention.
My preference would be the .45/70. i would work up a load with a 400-430 gr. WFNGC @ 1800 fps+- and familiarize yourself by shooting to 150 yds. (know your/rifles limitations). The amount of "drop" from 100 to 150 yds. is substantial.

pmeisel
February 23, 2009, 07:45 AM
30/30 will shoot flatter, and punish you less so you practice more with it.

woof
February 23, 2009, 07:48 AM
Very remote means it won't happen and if it does you'll have a different rifle by then anyway. So obviously the .30-30.

kragluver
February 23, 2009, 09:48 AM
Do like I did -- get both. Seriously, I settled on the .45-70 first as I already had a .270 and .30-06 for longer range shooting. I still ended up buying a nice used .30-30 a year later. Leverguns are a hoot. Whichever rifle you get, buy yourself a receiver sight (I have Williams sights on both of mine but there are several good ones out there) and get rid of the rear tangent sight.

wyocarp
February 23, 2009, 10:09 AM
The 45-70 doesn't have to be punishing. With lighter loads, it is fun to shoot. The range of it is also more than adequate for any of the deer hunting I've seen. The range will be more of a problem for elk unless you call that big guy in and if that is possible, a sling shot would often work if you were good.

W L Johnson
February 23, 2009, 10:42 AM
30-30

Flatter shooting, hard hitting (not as hard as 45/70 at short range tho), cheaper to shoot, plus with the new flex tip ammo it's a whole new ballgame compare to the older design 30-30 ammo. IMHO

medicine calf
February 23, 2009, 11:19 AM
LeverEvo is a nice improvement. 308 class ballistics is a whole new ball game.

fireman 9731
February 23, 2009, 11:35 AM
The new LeverRevolution ammo applies to the 45-70 too though.

Personaly, I would go for the 45-70, I just like it more.

Runningman
February 23, 2009, 11:35 AM
Shot my 1st Elk when I was a teen with a Winchester 94 30-30. Dropped it at about 80 yards with one shot. Eventually I sold it. Years later I wanted another lever gun so I bought a Marlin 45-70 with a 22" barrel. After a few years I decided to sell the 45-70. I missed the 20" barrel of the 30-30 and the lighter weight of the 30-30. The 45-70 ammo was expensive to practice with compared to 30-30. Ammo for the 45-70 was hit and mis as far as availability in stores around here, 30-30 was everywhere.

Ended up buying a nice Marlin 30-30 and mounded a compact Leupold 2-7X scope on this set up. Had this set up for over 10 years now. It shoots well, I really enjoy hunting with it when I take a lever gun.

gga357
February 23, 2009, 11:43 AM
No better reason than I really like the 4570.

darkknight
February 23, 2009, 12:11 PM
Either caliber will serve you well. The only reason I said 45-70 was because of elk. The 45-70 will hit harder but if u can't shoot it accurately it really doesn't matter. 30 30 ammo is considerably cheaper around here. So both are great choices. Pick which one you like and be happy with your decision.

Interceptor_Knight
February 23, 2009, 12:37 PM
There is really no comparison. The .45-70 will out kill the .30-30 at ANY range. Even when you compare the Leverevolution rounds which is the hottest .30-30 you will find, the trajectory difference is not enough to give up the hitting "power" of the .45-70. The ft-lbs are within 60 or so at 300 yds, but once that bullet hits the animal, the .45-70 and its over double mass and 1.5x diameter will penetrate further and kill larger game more efficiently. Most guys will be taking shots under 200 yards with a lever anyway and the .45-70 has 500 more ft-lbs of energy at 100 yds and over 200 ft-lbs at 200 yds. There again, you are hitting it with a larger diameter and more massive bullet.
Ammunition is about 1.5x as costly for the .45-70 but most people are not doing mag dumps on a lever action anyway. A Marlin 1895 in .45-70 is giving up no accuracy to a 336 in .30-30 and the 1895 shoots like a dream. The recoil really isn't that noticeable unless you are sitting at a bench with your shoulder leaning into it.

gvnwst
February 23, 2009, 05:05 PM
30-30, shoots flatter, less recoil, and cheaper ammmo. The last two will help you to pratice more, and with leverevolution ammo, it will do everything you listed, but watch the range you try to take elk at.

Peter M. Eick
February 23, 2009, 06:53 PM
30/30 has been putting down deer for over 100 years. If the 45-70 was better then it would be the standard today instead of a 30/30.

When was the last time you saw a 45-70 in deer camp in a lever?

grimjaw
February 23, 2009, 07:24 PM
Nothing wrong with the .45/70 for the game you mentioned, but .30-30 is less expensive to shoot and usually available at more retail outlets (if that matters to you). Borrow a rifle the next time you go elk hunting, shoot the .30-30 in the meantime.

jm

Deltaboy
February 23, 2009, 07:55 PM
30/30 you can find the ammo anywhere you go.

jmr40
February 23, 2009, 07:56 PM
If you really "NEEDED" a 45-70 you would know and not have to ask. Get the 30-30

Gewehr98
February 23, 2009, 09:50 PM
I did.

Tailor your loads for the application you have in mind. If you're recoil sensitive, punch paper and whitetails with the .30-30, or light .45-70 loads. If you need to go after black bear, run heavier .45-70 loads.

When was the last time you saw a 45-70 in deer camp in a lever?

Last fall. It was my "new" Marlin 1895G, 405gr cast bullet, and the venison is absolutely delicious!

wyocarp
February 24, 2009, 12:56 AM
If you really wanted the 30-30 you wouldn't have had to ask, so go ahead and get the real gun, the 45-70.

As much as most people will shoot either, neither of them will break the bank.

Gunfighter123
February 24, 2009, 02:23 AM
I like the 45/70 over the 30-30.

Either will do but there is just "that thing" about the 45/70 !!!



EDIT --- I reload the 45/70 and get over 35 reloads per case , bought 500 Starline brass new and have not had a single one split/crack etc. ---- I don't "hotrod" the 45/70 , with a 400+ grain bullet -- you don't really have to.

Rob96
February 24, 2009, 04:01 AM
The 30-30 is looking to be the pick.

Dr.Rob
February 24, 2009, 10:29 AM
I've seen plenty of .45/70's in deer & elk camp. That trend started over 10 years ago.

Fact is plenty of people have hunted elk with a .30-30.

For a new shooter I'd say .30-30. For an experienced shooter and reloader I'd say .45/70.

RSVP2RIP
February 24, 2009, 11:36 AM
I hate to throw a monkey wrench in the works, but whay not a .444 Marlin. Best of both worlds, flat shooting like the 30/30, big bullet like the 45/70... but you damn near HAVE to handload for it. Only two factory loads that you would have a prayer of getting at the local gunshop. Hornady 265 gr FP (great)and flex tip, and the Remington 240gr FP (garbage). Buffalo Bore, Grizzly, and CorBon also but good luck finding those on the shelf.

mavracer
February 24, 2009, 12:17 PM
either will work to start.you'll end up with both the lure of leverguns is nearly impossible to resist.

solvability
February 24, 2009, 12:24 PM
I have a 30-30 but want a 45-70 - would it do better - nope - I just want it - 45-70 though ranges in loads from mild to elephant - the 30-30 is all pretty mild but it sure gets the job done just fine.

I would get the 30-30 for sure if I did not want to handload - the 45-70 with handloads is not too expensive and lets you tailor the cartridge to the job at hand.

I saw a 300lb boar shot through the shoulders with the 45-70 - grapefruit sized exit. The 275 lb boar I shot with a 30-06 - quarter sized exit.

Internally the 30-06 did much more damage to the beast - but it is several 100 ft per sec faster than a 30-30.

All factors to weigh.

wyocarp
February 24, 2009, 01:34 PM
gunfighter123
I reload the 45/70 and get over 35 reloads per case , bought 500 Starline brass new and have not had a single one split/crack etc.

I agree that the reloads per individual case is high. But they do crack. I've just finished cleaning a bunch of various brass from this past fall and found two cracked hornady once fired factory load cases in 45-70. So, they do crack.

My only other problem is that any smaller brass likes to get into my big bore cases while cleaning.

http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn286/wyocarp/HPIM0331.jpg

Vern Humphrey
February 24, 2009, 01:49 PM
The .30-30 is very good at doing what the .30-30 was designed to do -- kill deer-sized critters at reasonable hunting ranges. It's not ideal for elk, but with modern bullets and loads, it will work.

The .45-70 is mostly for nostalgia. There's nothing the .45-70 will do that a .30-06 won't do -- and the .30-06 would be my choice for elk in a factory rifle. (Although I like the 7mm Remington and the .300 Win Mag as well.)

Kleanbore
February 24, 2009, 02:11 PM
The .45-70 will out kill the .30-30 at ANY range.

If it his a vital area.

An therein lies the problem: the trajectory. Art Eatman described it by comparing it to a basketball.

There are reasons why the .50-70 was replaced by the .45-70, the .45-70 was replaced by the .30 Army, and the .30 Army and the initial .30 Government rimless with the round-nose bullet were replaced by the .30 Government (.30-'06) in military usage and in most big game hunting applications. One of the main reasons was effective hitting range.

That's also the main reason why the .30-30, .303 Savage, etc. replaced old black-powder cartridges.

So--depends on the range you need, and on how well you tolerate recoil.

If the .30-30 with Leverevolution ammunition doesn't cut it for you and you still want a Marlin lever rifle, there's the .308 Marlin Express, which is superior to either of the cartridges you mentioned, and the .338 Marlin Express, which ups the ante into the .30-'06 realm but which may be more than you need. Drawbacks are ammunition availability and cost.

The .45-70 has had a resurgence in popularity in recent years after having been moribund for many decades. Personally, I don't understand the appeal. The .348 Winchester stayed in production a lot longer, but it was handicapped by the rainbow trajectory that resulted from the flat bullet technology of the time--and for my taste, the heavy recoil. Lighter, pointed bullets at higher velocities are better except at short ranges.

husker
February 24, 2009, 02:53 PM
sounds like a coin flip to me. i need to go shoot the 45-70 so i can give my 2 cents worth. good thread guys

Gewehr98
February 24, 2009, 03:01 PM
Those splits are exceptionally unusual for a .45-70. I'd have expected split case mouths from the 12th reloading, but those once-fired cases look like they were either sized too small, overpressure, or fired in an oversized chamber (or a combination of all three). I'd contact Hornady, ASAP. :eek:

Kleanbore, some of us care not one whit about rainbow trajectories or max point blank range. I've taken whitetail at 400+ yards with my Sharps BP loads. There's plenty of energy in a 535gr bullet at range, even at a leisurely 1200fps muzzle velocity. I knew the range to the deer, set the Creedmoor rear sight accordingly, and took the shot. No laser rangefinder, no 56mm objective, no overbore magnum - just like folks did back in the day. Leverguns don't have vernier sights, but there's no reason not to use something like my 1895G on edible game up to and including black bear - and I'd highly recommend the .45-70 levergun on the latter vs. a .30-30.

Kleanbore
February 24, 2009, 03:39 PM
I've taken whitetail at 400+ yards with my Sharps BP loads. There's plenty of energy in a 535gr bullet at range, even at a leisurely 1200fps muzzle velocity. I knew the range to the deer, set the Creedmoor rear sight accordingly, and took the shot.

Amazing shot!

How many people could do it? How many would want to try?

As I figure it you probably had to aim seventy or eighty inches high.(?)

By the way, what do you think the time of flight to have been?

Not for me, thanks.

Gewehr98
February 24, 2009, 04:27 PM
Really. We get wrapped around the axle over the darndest things.

I have a 3" tall rear sight on my Sharps, and it's good out to 1200 yards. 70" to 80" means nothing to me.

I know when I shoot buffalo silhouettes out to 1000 yards, I have time to look through my spotting scope and watch the incoming round smack the steel.

Time of flight to 400 yards is 1.15 seconds, with 236 inches of drop, according to the calculator. Time of flight to an 800 yard buffalo silhouette is 2.5 seconds, with 1079 inches of drop. Time of flight to 1000 yards is 3.25 seconds, with 1782 inches of drop. That's why there are such tall rear vernier sights on those rifles.

As to who does it? More than one would think at first, just go to Shiloh Sharps' website and view the customer trophy pics.

I wouldn't take the 400 yard whitetail shot if I wasn't comfortable with it. I'm not a total idiot - with that much hang time, if they were at a dead run, I'd wait for the next deer. What I'm trying to say is that we as hunters and shooters often get suckered into thinking we need a hot fast magnum with a laser-trajectory and huge light-sucker scope, when that's really not the case at all. If your skills allow you to go retro, then no harm, no foul.

I've filled my freezer using everything between a 6.5x53R to .45-70, and that includes my favorite laser beam 6.5-06, as well as the more sedate 7.62x39, .30-30, .30-06, .32 Remington, 8mm Mauser, and a whole bunch of others. If one is not comfortable with arched trajectories and longer times of flight, that's cool. Just don't say in a blanket statement that they shouldn't be used. That's not giving our shooting predecessors much credit at all, let alone the guy at deer camp who runs a Marlin 1895G. ;)

KBintheSLC
February 24, 2009, 04:30 PM
For the stated purpose, I'd go with the 30-30. Its plenty powerful for what you need to do with it. The ammo is less expensive too. 45-70 is a beast of a round, well suited for bears, large moose, elk, etc at close ranges. For mid-sized game at longer ranges, the 30-30 will do the job just fine... and cheaper.

sohcgt2
February 24, 2009, 05:53 PM
30-30 is less expensive to feed.

sprice
February 24, 2009, 05:58 PM
less expensive, flatter trajectory, less recoil, more common to find, that is all.

MT GUNNY
February 24, 2009, 05:59 PM
I voted 30.30
Plus I have two other Words for ya,

"Lever Evolution" http://www.hornady.com/story.php?s=198

CSA 357
February 24, 2009, 06:01 PM
The 4570 , my handloaded 300 gr fnhp is death on a deer, i would load 350gr for elk ,3030 aint even in the ball park with these loads, i do like the 3030 its a great deer round! Csa

Kleanbore
February 24, 2009, 06:59 PM
Just don't say in a blanket statement that they [guns with arched trajectories and longer times of flight] shouldn't be used.

Never said anything of the sort. However, I wouldn't recommend them for most people, particularly those who would ask the OP's question.

You skill is obviously much, much higher than average.

That's not giving our shooting predecessors much credit at all....

Our shooting predecessors used guns like that because they were the best available at the time, and they changed to guns that better met their needs as they became available.

Sharps didn't go out of business, and Remington Rolling Block and the Winchester 1886 and Model 71 (and 1892, for that matter) didn't go out of production, because our shooting predecessors "got suckered"--they lost popularity with those people with the advent of smokeless powder, because they could buy guns that they could use more effectively. The same thing had happened with muzzle loading rifles, and it happened with smooth bore hunting weapons before that. I won't take any credit at all from those who carried Hawken rifles into the Rockies, but it's likely that any Hawken user who lived long enough ended up carrying a breachloader.

That's not to say they should not be used by those who can and want to do so.

If you enjoy using them and can do so, great, but I think you would agree that the neophyte hunter would be better served by something that does not require accurate range estimation, trajectory calculation, sight adjustments at the time of the shot, and holding very high over the target.

High Planes Drifter
February 24, 2009, 07:44 PM
I said .30-30.

Aside from the previously mentioned reasons; a .30-30 Marlin, or Winchester is a gun you can hand to a youngster to hunt with, whereas a .45-70 would probably dish out too much recoil for a tennager, or preteen.

fireman 9731
February 24, 2009, 09:56 PM
Yikes Wyocarp:what:

For factory ammo to do that something has to be way wrong....

I have loaded my 45-70 rounds to well over Hornady factory pressures with nary even a bulge!

I would be sure to get that gun checked out!

wyocarp
February 24, 2009, 10:37 PM
I did contact Hornady and forwarded them the pictures. They responded in a very casual way and just said the metal was probably too hard (one sentence), end of story. I expected a little more from them, but Hornady didn't seem a bit surprised or worried.

wyocarp
February 24, 2009, 10:40 PM
I am absolutely shocked that so many are voting for the 30-30 over the 45-70. The only thing I can figure is that there are more people with the 30-30 rifles and they are probably in areas where game is smaller.

(That ought to raise some feathers.)

Harve Curry
February 24, 2009, 11:01 PM
I like the 45-70 and 1500-1600fps muzzle velocities are comfortable to shoot. It's accurate and I can compensate for trajectory out to 200 yards with iron sights on game.

mavracer
February 24, 2009, 11:21 PM
to all the people who are touting the 30/30s trajectory advantage.you do realize a 45/70 shoots flat enough to well out past where a 30/30 runs out of energy.ya sure it's probably easier to hit a deer at 300 yards with a 30/30 but does it have enough energy to reliably kill it humanly

Kleanbore
February 24, 2009, 11:44 PM
to all the people who are touting the 30/30s trajectory advantage.you do realize a 45/70 shoots flat enough to well out past where a 30/30 runs out of energy.ya sure it's probably easier to hit a deer at 300 yards with a 30/30 but does it have enough energy to reliably kill it humanly

That's a very good question. The .30-30 was in the old days considered a rather short range proposition due to the flat nose bullets. I'm not sure what the answer is with the Lever Evolution loads, but that is why I suggested the possibility of the .308 Marlin Express.

For many decades bolt rifles have been preferred by many over lever guns. The Savage an Browning lever guns provided alternatives, and I think the Hornady approach opens up new possibilities for Marlins.

Teddy Roosevelt liked the 1876 Winchester, but later in Africa he used an 1895 in .405 and a .30 Springfield (pre- '06, I believe). When I read a recent field review of the .338 Marlin express, my immediate thought was about how TR would have liked it.

wyocarp
February 25, 2009, 12:28 PM
ya sure it's probably easier to hit a deer at 300 yards with a 30/30 but does it have enough energy to reliably kill it humanly

I would think that if one is considering shots out to 300 yards and beyond, then it would be time to start thinking about something other than these two guns.

mavracer
February 25, 2009, 03:21 PM
That's a very good question. The .30-30 was in the old days considered a rather short range proposition due to the flat nose bullets. I'm not sure what the answer is with the Lever Evolution loads, but that is why I suggested the possibility of the .308 Marlin Express.
THEY MAKE LEVEREVOLUTION IN 45/70 TOO
I would think that if one is considering shots out to 300 yards and beyond, then it would be time to start thinking about something other than these two guns.
that was precicely my point:banghead:although as Gewehr98 has said with a little "kentucky windage" the 45/70 is more than capable of 300+

Kleanbore
February 25, 2009, 04:24 PM
I would think that if one is considering shots out to 300 yards and beyond, then it would be time to start thinking about something other than these two guns.

Yep!

For those who insist on the nostalgia, the Marlin .308 and .338 might well do the trick, from what i've heard.

Not that a good bolt gun wouldn't be a little more accurate, and more convenient to unload.

Years ago, I fired a Winchester Model 1886 in .45-90 on a range at 300 yards. I did hit pretty well after getting the zero. It would not be my choice for game that could be any way from 50 yards to 300 yards away.

Nor would I choose iron sights for 300 yard shots on game.

batmann
February 25, 2009, 05:49 PM
I think the .30-30 would serve you well. I like the .45-70, but it can me a little hard on the shoulder at times. The new Leverevolution ammo gives the the .30-30 extra range and a bit more pop on something like an Elk.

akjren
February 25, 2009, 07:17 PM
30-30 seems more realistic for me being in Florida. I'd like a 45-70 eventually but it would be too specialized for what I need.

sohcgt2
February 25, 2009, 07:44 PM
wyocarp wrote I am absolutely shocked that so many are voting for the 30-30 over the 45-70. The only thing I can figure is that there are more people with the 30-30 rifles and they are probably in areas where game is smaller.

(That ought to raise some feathers.)

The OP is asking about hunting boar and whitetail primarily w/possible shots at mule deer and elk. I am guessing that since he is from Pa. he like me rarely sees a shot of more than 150 yds. all of which makes the 30-30 a better overall choice. If he were out west with you I would lean more toward 45/70 or maybe a BLR in a magnum chambering.

Coyote_Hunter_
February 25, 2009, 08:21 PM
I have both. The .30-30 is all I need for most work but the .45-70 is a hoot to shoot. The .30-30 is a virgin in my hands while the .45-70 has taken a buck mulie at 197 yards and a 6x6 bull elk at 213 yards.

Wouldn’t want to give up either.

moooose102
February 25, 2009, 10:06 PM
well, i have both. but since you mention a possibility of elk, i voted for the 45/70. the really nice thing about the 45/70 is you can shoot easy shooting low pressure rounds or hot rod hornady rounds right from the factory. and, if you want to reload, IF YOU BUY A MARLIN (or single shot modern rifle), you can even go up from there! in handloader magazine, they have a guy shooting cape buffalo with a 45/70 marlin. one of his shots went through a bull, and killed the bull and the cow standing next to it. a 2 for 1 shot on cape buffalo. it aught to make short work out of anything on this continent!

waterhouse
February 25, 2009, 10:29 PM
I own both. I rarely shoot the 30-30.

I don't even hunt big animals, and I'm not a recoil junkie or anything, I just prefer shooting the 45-70. So I voted for that one. Either will do for your stated purposes.

cliffy
February 25, 2009, 10:48 PM
Gives a caliber betwixt the two aforementioned. A 200 grain .35 Remington is a true short-range brush-buster. A .45/70 is a shoulder buster, as is a poorly-stocked .30/30 without a proper recoil pad. A .243 Winchester actually performs as well as the aforementioned three. Get modern in selection and avoid the heavy recoil of the afformentioned three. Recoil does not benefit accuracy. Placing a proper bullet into the death zone supercedes all POWER benefits. cliffy

Harve Curry
February 26, 2009, 12:07 AM
Over 10 years ago there was a video made of tests firing about every cartridge there is into a "twig box". A target was aligned at both ends of this box with twigs and small leafy branches in it but not packed tight. All calibers up to and including the 50BMG were deflected away from the rear target, some hit the paper but not the bullseye. So brush buster is just a legend.

Rob96
February 26, 2009, 04:11 AM
The OP is asking about hunting boar and whitetail primarily w/possible shots at mule deer and elk. I am guessing that since he is from Pa. he like me rarely sees a shot of more than 150 yds. all of which makes the 30-30 a better overall choice. If he were out west with you I would lean more toward 45/70 or maybe a BLR in a magnum chambering.

You got the distance correct. A lot of times you can end up in some really thick stuff. Also correct on the boar and whitetail as primary with the mule deer right behind it. The elk will be the long shot. Well I head out this Friday night to the shop where I saw the Guide Gun, supposedly they have a 30-30 in now too. We will see what is there.

Gewehr98
February 27, 2009, 12:14 AM
It did quite a number on those wild pigs near Merritt Island and Kennedy Space Center. :D

nitestocker
February 27, 2009, 12:35 AM
unless you reload id go with the 30/30

akodo
February 27, 2009, 12:37 AM
depends on what else you have.

If you want ONE rifle (aside from say an AR-15 or other very specialty gun)

Then I'd say go for the 30-30 due to
1. more available ammo
2. less recoil
3. slightly flatter trajectory

if #3 isn't a big concern, I'd even suggest looking at a levergun in 44 magnum. (this will take elk off the table, but then, I think 30-30 for elk really limits you to really close ranges, and not a ton of elk are taken really close)

If you already have a second hunting rifle, something in say 308, or 30-06, or 270, or any of the common big magnums, then you can rely on that gun if ammo scarcity becomes an issue, or you want something less flat, etc.

In the case where you already have a good standard hunting rifle, and are looking for a fast handling brush gun, then I say go for the 45-70, it has all the fast handle, and twice the Wham!

theboondocksaints22
February 27, 2009, 12:37 AM
i like my marlin 1895 g 45-70 i use it for deer, hog,and old tv sets .

Rob96
February 27, 2009, 04:00 AM
I am actually going to be getting back into reloading. Tonight i am going up to the shop to more than likely buy the 45/70. They have it to the side with my name on it.

Before I called yesterday, my wife said if it was still there it ws meant to be mine. $429 NIB.

pmeisel
February 27, 2009, 06:48 AM
my wife said if it was still there it ws meant to be mine.

Good sign. Good wife. Was she sitting to the side with your name on her too?:-)

Rob96
February 27, 2009, 09:27 PM
Good sign. Good wife. Was she sitting to the side with your name on her too?:-)


Actaully before we got married, there was a period when I left and she was there for me when I came to common sense.;)

lefteyedom
February 27, 2009, 09:57 PM
Go with the 45/70 that is what Elmer Keith would have done.

I have had a couple of both 30/30 and 45/70. Both are good, both will kill elk easly if the bullet is put in the right spot in woodland ranges.
But the 45/70 is my first choice, 405 grains of lead is very comforting when the game has teeth.
I carried a H&R single shot in 45/70 in my truck for years. I should have kept that little gun.

2RCO
February 27, 2009, 09:59 PM
I have both--you should to!

Onmilo
February 27, 2009, 10:04 PM
Killed my first deer with a .30/30 and a couple more after that with this caliber.

I now own several .45-70 rifles, no .30/30s, and kill deer just as dead with them.

My choice is based on the fact I reload and the .30/30 is a pain in the patooty to reload for.

The question should actually be, 'which would you choose, .38-55 or .45-70?'

That would e a tougher decision, at least in my muddled brain!

Big_Willy
March 6, 2009, 11:20 AM
I'll stick with the take down power of the .45-70, there's no animal in North America it can't take on.


This is mine>>>>>>>
http://www.wisconsinvarminters.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=775


I drill one ragged hole at 100 yards.


Bill

lead-inspector
March 6, 2009, 12:05 PM
I have 30-30, 38-55 and 45-70 (others too). I vote for the 45-70. It can be downloaded to lessen recoil or uploaded to take any North American game. The 30-30 does not have the same upper power as the 45-70.

Steve

whited
March 6, 2009, 07:21 PM
Get a Browning lever in .308.

DAdams
March 6, 2009, 07:46 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v237/dmadams/034006x1m.jpg

Get a Browning lever in .308.

Great idea, thanks for pointing that out. Two inches longer (40inches) than my 1894 30/30. I like it.

DAdams
March 6, 2009, 07:52 PM
more pictures...

30-30 Marlin, 1946 4X Weaver

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v237/dmadams/P7040046-1.jpg

30-30 Winchester 1945

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v237/dmadams/P6180042-3.jpg

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