38 special Mid Range?


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Blue Brick
February 23, 2009, 11:13 PM
What is Smith and Wesson 38 special Mid Range? And what is Hi-speed and 38-44?

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ArchAngelCD
February 24, 2009, 01:55 AM
I'm not sure what you are asking. Are you asking about a revolver or the round it shoots?

owlhoot
February 24, 2009, 02:04 AM
.38 Special mid-range is normally a 148 gr. full wadcutter bullet loaded to target velocity.

.38 special High Speed sounds like an older company designation for a little hotter than standard load before the day of the +P designations.

.38-40 is an old black powder cartridge. Not a true .38, it is closer to a .40 Caliber bullet, usually 180 to 200 grs. loaded behind 40 grains of BP. It can be had through speciality outfits loaded with modern smokeless powder.

Radagast
February 24, 2009, 07:42 AM
.38-44 was hot loaded .38 special (near .357 magnum velocities) for use in the N Frame Heavy Duty & Outdoorsman revolvers, which later became the S&W Model 20 & Model 23 It was .38 caliber ammunition for use in .44 sized guns and was the precursor to the .357 magnum. The guns were made from around 1930.

IIRC .38 high speed was the same ammo from a different maker.

The Lone Haranguer
February 24, 2009, 09:03 AM
I've always associated "mid-range" with the target wadcutter load.

PO2Hammer
February 24, 2009, 12:31 PM
Radagast has it right on the .38-44.

Mid range can refer to any less than maximum factory load. Federal had a very popular .357 midrange lead SWC load at about 1,000 fps.

Hi-Speed was just the maker bragging, I think Remington used it as a sales pitch on their ammo boxes. I don't think it meant anything at all.

Radagast
February 24, 2009, 04:36 PM
P02 Hammer is probably right, according to the Standard Catalog of Smith & Wesson the .38-44 was renamed .38 High Velocity, not .38 High Speed.

Peter M. Eick
February 26, 2009, 07:22 PM
It depends on what vintage.

I have boxes of 38-44 High Speed Smith and Wesson Special ammo. I also have boxes that say they are 38-44 High Speed and some brass that is 38-44 Special.

I call it the 38/44 High Speed round since that "seems" to be the more common name in the older literature but then again I am learning every day.

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