WD40 and Gun Cleaning


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wrs840
February 25, 2009, 09:38 PM
I'm one of those guys that became wary of using WD40 for much of anything but a water-displacement-agent... under distributor caps and such. "Causes Rust" folks say...

Here's an advocate of using WD40 as a gun cleaner:

http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/edu46.htm

Is WD40 as a cleaner/solvent for guns a good idea? Whadda ya think?

Thanks,
Les

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mbt2001
February 25, 2009, 09:41 PM
I don't like to use WD-40 and wouldn't advocate it at all. It evaporates and causes wear and rust when the gun gets hot, which can destroy a gun...

fireman 9731
February 25, 2009, 09:48 PM
I think its great stuff, I dont ever use it for the main lubrication in my guns because I prefer something a tad heavier. But as far as cleaning and rust prevention goes, its my go to item. All my guns get a light wipe down with it before storage and boy does it make the bore shine!

Its a fraction of the price of other products and its very versatile. It will always have a place on my shelf.

MutinousDoug
February 25, 2009, 10:14 PM
THe WD in WD-40 stands for "water displacement" It does a good job of that by being, what, 60% solvent and 40% oil? Evaporation of the solvent results in a grease like crud left behind.
Use it for it's intended purpose and you'll be fine.
It is NOT a gun oil. Never intended to be.
HTH
Doug

WardenWolf
February 25, 2009, 10:22 PM
In my opinion, WD-40 has no business near a firearm. It dries out, it leaves gunk behind, and is utterly unsuited as a firearm lubricant. WD-40 should really only be used for its intended uses, freeing stuck bolts and easily-cleanable mechanisms. It is a temporary lubricant, being truly effectively only for a few hours (or days if not exposed to air). For firearm uses, use a proper lubricant like Hoppes or Breakfree.

GRIZ22
February 25, 2009, 10:28 PM
iI've used WD40 for a solvent and would rate it okay not great in that role. I use it to displace water after the weapon has been immersed in water or out in the rain. I then clean it out and use conventional solvents and lubricants. It is very good as an exterior rust preventative.

The only time I used it as a lubricant was in M60 machine guns in very cold weather but that was some time ago when the modern wonder lubes weren't around.

jmr40
February 25, 2009, 10:28 PM
WD40 is not a good gun oil. It was developed during WW-2 to displace water in electrical equipment to keep it working. As others have said it can cause a build up of crud that can be difficult to remove later. It can get into small crevices such as the trigger or safety and gum things up. It has also been claimed that it can seep into primers on self defense handguns causing them to mis-fire.

For wiping down exterior surfaces of a barrel or action it may be OK to prevent rust or remove dirt but I would avoid getting it into moving parts.

Cannonball888
February 25, 2009, 10:29 PM
I found that it causes or it doesn't prevent rust. I don't use it.

Buddy Rabbit
February 25, 2009, 10:31 PM
WD40 does a great job on a great many things.
That said (sharp lesson learned), I don't like having it even in the same room with my guns.

My wife (God bless her) is understanding. Counseling has helped with the nightmares.

I don't want to talk about it.

warnerwh
February 25, 2009, 10:32 PM
There's absolutely no reason to use that stuff on your guns. It will kill primers, it's useless as a lubricant because it's gone in two days and gun solvents will work better as a solvent. It's also useless for protecting metals.

_N4Z_
February 25, 2009, 10:32 PM
As already stated, use it for it's intended purpose and all is well.

I use WD-40 in the bores of my rifles anytime they shoot surplus ammunition.
Flush bore with water to remove salts, flush bore with WD to remove water, then clean with usual solvents to remove the WD, carbon, copper, etc.
When lubrication is needed I use Mobile1 synthetic.

WD is to get the moisture out, nothing more.

Been doing this a few years now. No rust yet.

Flea
February 25, 2009, 10:41 PM
I have used it for years during breakdown/cleaning on my weapons with great results. REALLY cleaned up/out my Winchester 74 (which was coughing out play sand sized chunks of lead from the receiver when I first broke it down).

I wouldn't use it as your ONLY lube or cleaner, but it certainly works as intended. I prefer a good moly dry lube as a primary lubricant before a weapon is stored or fired.

jay870
February 25, 2009, 10:49 PM
"Water Displacing 40th" recipe is what the name stands for. The 40th recipe was the first that successfully worked for its originaly purpose. See above response about WWII for original purpose.

fireman 9731
February 25, 2009, 11:11 PM
To clarify a few things...

Straight from the WD-40 website:



What does WD-40 stand for?

WD-40 literally stands for Water Displacement, 40th attempt. That's the name straight out of the lab book used by the chemist who developed WD-40 back in 1953. The chemist, Norm Larsen, was attempting to concoct a formula to prevent corrosion-a task which is done by displacing water. Norm's persistence paid off when he perfected the formula on his 40th try.

How long does WD-40 last after application?

While this may vary depending on the application, WD-40 remains effective even after it appears to dry. The corrosion and rust protection ingredients remain adhered to the surface. External conditions may, of course, require additional applications of WD-40 for maximum protection.


What does WD-40 do?

WD-40 fulfills five basic functions:
1. CLEANS: WD-40 gets under dirt, grime and grease to clean. It also dissolves adhesives, allowing easy removal of labels, tape and excess bonding material.
2. DISPLACES MOISTURE: Because WD-40 displaces moisture, it quickly dries out electrical systems to eliminate moisture-induced short circuits.
3. PENETRATES: WD-40 loosens rust-to-metal bonds and frees stuck, frozen or rusted metal parts.
4. LUBRICATES: WD-40's lubricating ingredients are widely dispersed and tenaciously held to all moving parts.
5. PROTECTS: WD-40 protects metal surfaces with corrosion-resistant ingredients to shield against moisture and other corrosive elements.


What about using WD-40 on my sports equipment?

WD-40 is safe and effective to use on all types of sporting goods. Use WD-40 on your bike to clean, degrease and lubricate your chain, derailleur, gears, cogs, and moving parts. It will help remove stickers. Use WD-40 to clean and protect your gun. It will prevent corrosion and it won't damage bluing. Spray it on dirt bikes to protect parts and prevent mud from sticking. Use it on watercraft to protect metal surfaces from corrosion and to drive out moisture. WD-40 is also great for cleaning golf clubs and preventing rust on hockey skate blades.


I dont think people should be knocking it as much as they are... Sure its not the perfect multipurpose all-in-one product that we are looking for, but I'm pretty sure it wont hurt a gun at all when used within its intended purposes!

X-Rap
February 25, 2009, 11:18 PM
The makers have conspired with the Brady Bunch to destroy all firearms.:evil:

Oro
February 25, 2009, 11:35 PM
Sure its not the perfect multipurpose all-in-one product that we are looking for, but I'm pretty sure it wont hurt a gun at all when used within its intended purposes!

Um, yest it will. And I am SURE of that. After enough applications, the distinctive yellow/brown crud residue it leaves behind works very nicely to interfere with small parts, particular revolver actions.

I have had a few GREAT gun buys where I paid little for a gun with action problems, then found the solution was to blast out the dried WD-40 with brake cleaner, lube it and put it straight back into service. I recall specifically both a S&W 60 and 67 that came cheap because of previous owner's WD-40 abuse. The residue is distinctive and you know what it is when you see it.

The only situation I would use WD-40 on a gun is if it got a salt water dunking, and then as soon as possible would strips and degrease it thoroughly to get the WD-40 out and return it to service.

dmazur
February 26, 2009, 01:14 AM
Yes, enough WD-40 application without some form of degreasing can build a sticky residue. The "thin film" is true for one application. What about 20 years worth?

I used WD-40 on a Ruger .44 carbine for many years before switching to a gun oil. Recently it started having feed problems. Then I got a second .44 carbine in an auction and it had the same symptoms except 10x worse!

While I can't prove the second carbine was also exposed to WD-40, the inside of the magazine tube was coated with the same sticky film as the first one. It slowed the speed of the cartridges in the magazine enough to kill proper function.

In fact, it was present on a lot of surfaces. I'm guessing the original owner used WD-40 like I did. On everything. (Can't hurt, right?)

A thorough cleaning with a solvent got rid of the sticky mess. Both carbines feed reliably now, and all I use is Tetra lube.

ThrottleJockey
February 26, 2009, 01:26 AM
I spray it on fishing lures. Works great to attract fish.

wrc376
February 26, 2009, 01:32 AM
I hear it can alter patinas as well... the ONLY firearm I use it on is the receiver of my marlin 60... it blows the gunk out and lubricates for the day

dirty damn .22 ammo

jimmyraythomason
February 26, 2009, 02:05 AM
I..oh,what's the use? WD-40 haters are convinced in spite of countless rebuttals to the "it'll gum up your gun " myth. So I'll just forget I even saw this thread and move on.

renegade1alpha
February 26, 2009, 04:21 AM
While serving in Iraq where fine dust permeates EVERYTHING, including weapons, I found WD-40 to be a fantastic gun cleaner and used it all the time. We used it on our 50 cal, 240 Bravos, SAW's, M4's and our M9's. With that said, once we used it to clean everything, we wiped everything down THEN lubricated our weapons with Break Free and later with MILTECH. As for my personal weapons, I will use it sparingly to clean all my guns (followed by MILTECH as a lubricant) and have not found it to be a problem yet.

SIRVEYR666
February 26, 2009, 08:42 AM
WD-40, motor oil and Auto Zone brake cleaner work great to clean my guns. I have never had any problems in the past 25 years when using these fluids. I actually shoot my guns a lot, so it might be different if I they were safe queens or only used to impress my friends.

MADDOG
February 26, 2009, 08:54 AM
WD40



'I had a neighbor who had bought a new pickup. I got up very early one Sunday morning and saw that someone had spray painted red all around the sides of this beige truck (for some unknown reason). I went
over, woke himup, and told him the bad news. He was very upset and was trying to figure out what to do.
Probably nothing until Monday morning, since nothing was open.

Another neighbor came out and told him to get his WD-40 and clean it off. It removed the unwanted paint beautifully and did not harm his paint job thatwas on the truck. I was impressed! WD-40-- who knew?'
Water Displacement#40.

The product began from a search for a rust preventative solvent and degreaser to protect missile parts. WD-40 was created in 1953 by three technicians at the San Diego Rocket Chemical Company. Its name comes from the project that was to find a 'water displacement' compound. They were successful with the fortieth formulation; thus WD-40.

The Corvair Company bought it in bulk to protect their atlas missile parts. Ken East (one of the original founders) says there is nothing in WD-40 that would hurt you...'It is made from fish oil.

When you read the 'shower door' part, try it. It's the first thing that has ever cleaned that spotty shower door. If yours is plastic, it works just as well as glass.

Then try it on your stovetop. It is now shinier than it has ever been before.

~ Protects silver from tarnishing.
~ Removes road tar and grime from cars.
~ Cleans and lubricates guitar strings.
~ Gives floors that 'just-waxed' sheen without making it slippery.
~ Keeps flies off cows!
~ Restores and cleans chalkboards.
~ Removes lipstick stains.
~ Loosens stubborn zippers.
~ Untangles jewelry chains.
~ Removes stains from stainless steel sinks.
~ Removes dirt and grime from the barbecue grill.
~ Keeps ceramic/ terra cotta garden pots from oxidizing.
~ Removes tomato stains from clothing.
~ Keeps glass shower doors free of waterspots.
~ Camouflages scratches in ceramic and marble floors.
~ Keeps scissors working smoothly.
~ Lubricates noisy door hinges on vehicles and doors in homes.
~ It removes black scuff marks from the kitchen floor!
~ Open some windows if you have a lot of marks.
~ Bug guts will eat away the finish on your car. Removed quickly, with WD-40!
~ Gives a children's play gym slide a shine for a super fast slide.
~ Lubricates gear shift on lawn mowers.
~ Rids kids' rocking chairs and swings of squeaky noises.
~ Lubricates tracks in sticking home windows and makes them easier to open.
~ Spraying an umbrella stem makes it easier to open and close.
~ Restores and cleans padded leather dashboards in vehicles, as well as vinyl bumpers.
~ Restores and cleans roof racks on vehicles.
~ Lubricates and stops squeaks in electric fans.
~ Lubricates wheel sprockets on tricycles, wagons and bicycles for easy handling.
~ Lubricates fan belts on washers and dryers and keeps them running smoothly.
~ Keeps rust from forming on saws and saw blades and other tools.
~ Removes splattered grease on stove.
~ Keeps bathroom mirror from fogging.
~ Lubricates prosthetic limbs.
~ Keeps pigeons off the balcony (they hate the smell).
~ Removes all traces of duct tape.
~ Folks even spray it on their arms, hands, and knees to relieve arthritis pain . (My Dad did this to his knee
and swore up and down it worked)
~ Florida 's favorite use: 'cleans and removes Love Bugs from grills and bumpers.'
~ Protects the Statue of Liberty from the elements.
~ WD-40 attracts fish. Spray a LITTLE on live bait or lures and you will be catching the big one in no time.
~ Fire ant bites. It takes the sting away immediately and stops the itch.
~ WD-40 is great for removing crayon from walls. Spray on the mark and wipe with a clean rag.
~ If you've washed and dried a tube of lipstick with a load of laundry, saturate the lipstick spots with WD-40
and re-wash.. Presto! Lipstick is gone!
~ If you spray WD-40 on the distributor cap, it will displace the moisture and allow the car to start.
~ Keep a can of WD-40 in your kitchen cabinet over the stove. It is good for oven burns or any other type
of burn. It takes the burned feeling away and heals with NO scarring. Remember, the basic ingredient is
FISH OIL!

jrhines
February 26, 2009, 09:26 AM
water displacement, 40 is the IQ of anyone who believes kerosene is a lubricant!" That being said, I buy it by the gallon can, use it as a cutting lube for some materials on the lathe and mill. I have a gallon can with the top cut off that I have dunked entire seized up pistols in to break them free for servicing. I also use Kroil, but it is more expensive. By the way, Kroil will do pretty much all the stuff WD-40 does, but I use it mostly as a penetrating oil to break free stubborn screws. WD-40 is great stuff, I have at least 4 spray bottles around the shop, but I don't use it to lube my guns. YMMV.

dirt_j00
February 26, 2009, 09:33 AM
wrs840 - I don't use WD40 on my guns, and here's why:

I watched my dad "clean" his guns for years with WD40. This cleaning essentially just involved spraying WD40 into the barrel and every nook & cranny, and then wiping it down.

He has since given me most of his collection, and I have been going thru them one-by-one disassemblying them and cleaning them thoroughly.

I have found large amounts of black gunk in the action of all of them.

Whether this can be directly contributed to the WD40 is debatable, I suppose, but after seeing that, I will stick to products designed to clean guns. IMHO YMMV

AK103K
February 26, 2009, 09:36 AM
Funny how it served so well for decades, and now it seems to be the bane of the internet gun world.

I used it most of my life, and never had any of the issues you see posted. No gumming or varnish, no rust, no dead primers, nada. Kind of makes you wonder what those who seem to have these problems were doing to have them.

While these days, there are better things and we do move on, I still have a big can with my gun stuff, and while the can lasts a lot longer now, it does still get used fairly regularly, and still works well for that purpose and many others.

Geneseo1911
February 26, 2009, 10:18 AM
The truly great thing about WD-40 is that it is so cheap. I have plastic tub I put my bolts/slides, etc in, spray down with WD-40 (there's enough in there now to immerse most small parts) and let it sit while I clean the barrel. When I come back, the fouling & dirt is loose , and most runs off when I pull the part out. I give it a good wipe down, oil what needs to be oiled, and rest assured that IF I didn't get oil into a place that needed it, it will at least be minimally lubricated and rust-proofed until the next cleaning.

I have also used WD to protect bare sheet metal. It works quite well, and guess what.....it leaves a greasy film. That's what it's designed to do. All of the bad-mouthing of WD-40 (I think) comes from people who used it SOLELY, or (as mentioned above) just spray it in without proper disassembly and cleaning. Over time, that protective film WILL build up, which is why it needs to be scrubbed off once in a while. It is a TOOL, not an all-in-one solution. Hoppe's, brake cleaner, WD-40, grease, motor oil, (insert your favorite lube CLP, etc here), all have a use and a place.

As for rust protection, have a look at this...
http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/GunTech/NewsletterArchive.aspx?p=0&t=1&i=503
This is a side-by side test of several chemicals Brownell's sells, and it is a real eye opener about why solution #40 has survived 60 years as a corrosion preventer.

PS-WD-40 will take parkerizing from gray to a deep, rich black. Spray it on your AR or your Springer Mil-Spec, rub it in with a felt cloth, and marvel at the difference!

warnerwh
February 26, 2009, 10:44 AM
My opinion has been quite wrong according to this test. Thank you for posting this.

X-Rap
February 26, 2009, 10:59 AM
For those complaining about the lifetime buildup of residue left from WD-40 on guns that were never striped down and cleaned. Take your motor oil, CLP, or anything else in vogue today and spray it into an action and never strip and clean the gun for 20 or 30 yrs and your kid will be complaining about how lousy their dads compound was.
Oily substances collect dust and grit, heck moist substances do it why would you think that WD-40 wouldn't.

Vader
February 26, 2009, 11:00 AM
WD-40, motor oil and Auto Zone brake cleaner work great to clean my guns. I have never had any problems in the past 25 years when using these fluids. I actually shoot my guns a lot, so it might be different if I they were safe queens or only used to impress my friends.

Ditto here, I've done for a liitle over 5 years and so far it has been great. I use WD40 to losen crud, scrub wiht a toothbrush, then blast it wit Non-Chlorinated BC and then WallyWorld's 5W20 Sinthetic Oil. And to clean the barrel just gool ol' homemade Ed's Red

Calibre44
February 26, 2009, 11:03 AM
Ive used it for years in 10.22 mags to solve feed problems. Quick spray inside each mag then immediately upend them and drain the fluid out.

Works fine for me.

Afy
February 26, 2009, 11:38 AM
I use it on my cheap shotgun all the time. Even when it gums up with residue and gunk from shooting cheapie ammo and dust... WD 40 gets it going. Then again even if the gun gets junked it isnt a big deal.
I also use it liberally on my Blackpowder guns before I store them and know that I wont be using them for a few months.

I have had no issues with using WD 40.

On my active, target guns I use conventional products.

dirt_j00
February 26, 2009, 11:51 AM
Oily substances collect dust and grit, heck moist substances do it why would you think that WD-40 wouldn't.

I do not think that... That is why I clean my guns properly. :scrutiny:

Maybe you missed this part: Whether this can be directly contributed to the WD40 is debatable or this: IMHO YMMV

your kid will be complaining about how lousy their dads compound was Where did I complain again? Can you show me?

Do we now have gun-solvent snobs to add to the collection? I use products made to clean guns. You use whatever you want.

I intended to help the OP by posting my experience with WD40. What did you add to help the OP?

Sorry if I stepped on your can of WD40. :)

jay870
February 28, 2009, 02:54 AM
Did anyone else actually click on the link in the original post? Very nice Python. Perhaps I am just noticing a difference in lighting, but the grips in the last pics are much darker after getting the WD treatment. Actually everything in the "after" pictures seem like they have a different sparkle to them.

DHJenkins
February 28, 2009, 07:13 AM
Using it as a cleaner/solvent works fine. Just make sure to follow up with some proper gun oil.

76shuvlinoff
February 28, 2009, 07:26 AM
yep, cleaner not a long term lube

makarovnik
February 28, 2009, 02:41 PM
I use it for cleaning and degreasing but not for lubrication. While it may be a light lubricant I prefer CLP, 3 in 1 oil or gun treatment after I use WD-40.

I live in the pacific nw where humidity is usually pretty high. No problems with rust yet.

RP88
February 28, 2009, 02:47 PM
I prefer CLP

yokel
February 28, 2009, 03:21 PM
WD-40 soak is just the thing for yokel's mini 14 after rapid firing with cheap, dirty, smokey wolf ammo.

Hk91-762mm
February 28, 2009, 05:46 PM
I aquired a really nasty rusted Small auto I put it in a ziploc bag and sprayed a bunch of WD in with it after a few weeks the rust softened enough to attack with a tooth brush wire brush. Its the Tops for my Nylon 66 After shooting cheep dirty 22 ammo Spray work action -spray again stand in the corner on a rag bore down a couple drops oil for lube later..
Its not a primary lubs -But it has its place .

rogerjames
February 28, 2009, 06:14 PM
Used WD 40 to clean the cosmoline off my AK mags. Read it somewhere, so I tried it... seemed to work well.

amd6547
February 28, 2009, 06:39 PM
The only way WD40 would get on my firearm is if my firearm was behind my bicycle chain when I sprayed it...Oh yeah, I don't even use it on the bike!

Deltaboy
February 28, 2009, 08:35 PM
I have used it for years to wipe down my guns that have gotten wet duck hunting or hunting in the rain. But you still have to clean them when your done.

I have an 870 wingmaster that is 25 years old and has not 1 speck of rust and it has always been wiped down on the outside with WD-40 on some old t shirt.

For tools in your tool box it is great as a wipe down agent to prevent rust.

novaDAK
February 28, 2009, 08:37 PM
I know of guns that were preserved with WD40 for 30 years and none of them have a bit of rust at all.

blkbrd666
February 28, 2009, 09:01 PM
Been using it for years(40 of them) as a cleaner and lube. Even had a couple of guns stored over 20 years with nothing done to them except spraying them down before storage...no rust...guns are still new. I still use it as a cleaner for all guns but use gun oils or synthetic bike lubes for lubrication purposes. It's just mineral spirits, mineral oil, ~8-9% inert incredients, and CO2 for propellant...none of these ingredients will harm a gun. Cosmoline will gum up a gun's action with yellowish brown muck too, but it's a decent storage media...you just clean it off when you want to use the gun.

WardenWolf
February 28, 2009, 09:17 PM
I use WD-40 for 1 reason and 1 reason only: killing black widows. Hit one at close range, and they drop dead right there. I've seen them dead before they hit the ground. For everything else, there's Breakfree.

Jim K
February 28, 2009, 09:26 PM
One good reason not to use WD-40 is that under humid conditions, it can, itself, mildew and the mildew attacks the wood or metal underneath. The result is a ruined finish.

There are far better gun cleaners that will protect guns, not destroy them.

I do find WD-40 useful on garage door hardware, though.

Jim

.38 Special
February 28, 2009, 10:32 PM
I..oh,what's the use? WD-40 haters are convinced in spite of countless rebuttals to the "it'll gum up your gun " myth. So I'll just forget I even saw this thread and move on.

Bingo. In my experience, the people who argue against WD-40 are generally people that have not used it and are just repeating the nonsense they've heard somewhere. There is, of course, the subset that sprays the daylights out of a gun for years on end and then complains about "build-up".

Conversely, there are folks that use it intelligently, ie. a a quick spray on a rag to clean powder fouling off of a surface, or a light coating on the gun to keep it from rusting during the few weeks or month before it goes back to the range. Those folks (gasp!) seem to have perfectly good luck.

To read some of the stuff around here, WD-40 is about equivalent to sulfuric acid. Hopefully that sort of opinion is self-evidently stupid.

X-Rap
February 28, 2009, 10:46 PM
Just don't park your bike next to your guns you might get some on the bike.:rolleyes:

StoPPeR
February 28, 2009, 11:30 PM
WOW!

I just watched a thread be closed on a ammo tax topic and it was closed because it has been discussed too many times. Obama was just elected so some are interested in starting the topic over. It is relevant and valuable to discuss such topic when pertinent information changes, I suggest.

However, this topic, "WD40" has been done to death for years. Why has it not been closed. It is ridiculous. WD40 is for water displacement. Jeez why is it ok to rehash this crap but, no, can't discuss taxes.

Disputes over taxes is what made this country, lest anyone forget.

It seems to be little more than the pathertic teacher in the new currently, that is afraid because his student thinks differently than he.

I also understand that the thread deleted was probably a troll but it does not negate my argument.

I am a bit lit up tonight because I just found out that I am unable to carry at my new employer. They have a very open floor plan.

Palehorseman
February 28, 2009, 11:33 PM
WD-40 is a must have for my guns, we live in AZ and use only evaporative (swamp) coolers during the summer. After decades, I have never had a rust problem on any item I have applied it to, this is especially so with my BP ML guns. Nuff said.

wrs840
February 28, 2009, 11:47 PM
Well pardon me StoPPeR, but although this thread has taken a few swerves, I asked for opinions on if WD-40 was a decent solvent / cleaner, not a lubricant or protectant / preservative, and I think I've learned a few things from the experiences posted. Take a pill.

Thanks for the opinions, everyone.

Les

jimmyraythomason
March 1, 2009, 12:04 AM
I know that there are MANY lubricants,rust preventatives and penetrating oils on the market that are superior to WD-40 for their intended uses. My intent is not to extoll the virtues of WD-40 though they be many and varied. My problem is with the bashers that accuse it of things that it is not capable of doing. It will not gum up anything unless misused(i.e. left on for years with no other cleaning),it will not cause rust and it will not mildew. If anyone experiences these problems look elsewhere for the culprit. If anyone doesn't want to use it ,don't ,but dont disparage a good product.

Dr.Awkward
March 1, 2009, 12:13 AM
I developed an anti-WD-40 reflex as an audio engineer, after seeing the results of folks trying to clean their gear with it (generally, it would be a mixing board that someone had spilled beer/orange juice/candle wax on, and the gunk seeped in, but I've seen it used as a general "clean-all" too.) WD-40 would get off the gunk, but leave its own behind (not to mention messing up the conductive plastics used in faders. Eek!)

It's Eezox for my firearms for me!


(and faderLube for my mixers)

wrs840
March 1, 2009, 12:23 AM
OK Doc. Can you I.D. this mixer?

Les

StoPPeR
March 1, 2009, 12:43 AM
wrs840, any spares? :)

Try cleaning a bearing with wd40 and you will quickly see why some argue againstits use. It's improper use can cause abrasion issues. Why chance it. I saw too many ruin bearing on m61's by using wd40.

I miss pd6-80.

wrs840
March 1, 2009, 12:46 AM
Here's a spare :D:

WardenWolf
March 1, 2009, 01:18 AM
we live in AZ and use only evaporative (swamp) coolers during the summer.

You know, Palehorseman, they invented this thing called an "air conditioner" a long time ago. I know it's more expensive to run, and I don't fault you for running a swamp cooler for light duty days, but decades with just a swamp cooler? My word!

Hush
March 1, 2009, 01:36 AM
If you're going to post some of a story, post all of the story. An above post mentioned some uses for wd-40 and claimed it was manufactured from fish oil. That text was part of this article, which was disputing the fish oil claims and provides facts to back it up.
http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/household/wd-40.asp

wrs840
March 1, 2009, 02:18 AM
I'm pretty sure it ain't fish-oil.

Duh.

Les

X-Rap
March 1, 2009, 10:15 AM
And I'm pretty sure it dosn't mildew as someone posted.

SlamFire1
March 1, 2009, 10:33 AM
With that said, once we used it to clean everything, we wiped everything down THEN lubricated our weapons with Break Free and later with MILTECH. As for my personal weapons, I will use it sparingly to clean all my guns (followed by MILTECH as a lubricant) and have not found it to be a problem yet.

Wiping off WD-40 would remove most of the WD-40 and whatever residue is left after the light oils evaporate. Going over the surface later with break free would dissolve the remaining WD-40 into a good lubricant.

The MSDS of WD-40 is here. http://www.wd40company.com/files/pdf/msds-wd494716385.pdf

It has volatile oils, slightly heavier oil, and the secret ingredient : "non hazardous ingredients"

I suspect the non hazardous ingredients contain silicone. The oils evaporate off leaving silicone.

The oils would dissolve powder residue, because "like dissolves like". I have no doubt there are better powder solvents, and one is called "GI Bore Cleaner". Mineral spirits, acetone, are probably better. Any of the surface cleaners used in automotive paint shops are excellent solvents. (They will dissolve the powder residue and your plastic grips!)

I did a rust test with penny nails in salt water. WD-40 did good. But it only provides short term rust protection. It is not going to be as good a lubricant as motor oil. In fact since so few oils are better lubricants than motor oils, lets just say, there are a lot more oils which are better lubricants than WD-40.

If you want a very good, cheap, gun powder solvent, just Google "ed's red" and make that. If you want an excellent, cheap lubricant, use motor oil.

481
March 2, 2009, 02:01 AM
WD-40 is nothing more than Stoddards solvent (aka: "mineral spirits") and a light minerally derived petroleum oil propelled by CO2. It works well as a penetrant and water displacer; has "very light" lubricating properties.

For what it is, it works well and has its place in removing H2O from the internal mechanisms of firearms. If one is "squeamish" or "nervous" about it, it can be rinsed from the action of a firearm by any of the readily available firearms degreasers or automotive carburetor cleaner. Nothing to get all excited about. Most folks use mineral spirits anyway without the realization that it composes the majority of WD-40's content.

Quite frankly, one can clean, lubricate and protect their firearms with just four chemicals (only one of which is a "gun specific" product), those being:

1. WD-40 (water displacement) (optional)
2. Carburetor Cleaner; Non-chlorinated formulation (degreaser/water displacement)
3. Hoppes #9 (copper/powder solvent) and
4. Mobil 1 Synthetic 20w50 "V-Twin" or 10w40 motorcycle oil (lubricant)

Harold Mayo
March 2, 2009, 02:07 AM
300+ firearms cleaned and lubed almost exclusively with WD-40 over 20+ years and no signs of rust or wear indicating poor lubrication...looks like the kool-aid isn't all that good.

rogerjames
March 2, 2009, 03:00 AM
WOW!

I just watched a thread be closed on a ammo tax topic and it was closed because it has been discussed too many times. Obama was just elected so some are interested in starting the topic over. It is relevant and valuable to discuss such topic when pertinent information changes, I suggest.

However, this topic, "WD40" has been done to death for years. Why has it not been closed. It is ridiculous. WD40 is for water displacement. Jeez why is it ok to rehash this crap but, no, can't discuss taxes.

Disputes over taxes is what made this country, lest anyone forget.

It seems to be little more than the pathertic teacher in the new currently, that is afraid because his student thinks differently than he.

I also understand that the thread deleted was probably a troll but it does not negate my argument.

I am a bit lit up tonight because I just found out that I am unable to carry at my new employer. They have a very open floor plan.
StoPPeR is offline Report Post

Good argument, wrong place to post dissatisfaction:)

Oro
March 2, 2009, 03:12 AM
looks like the kool-aid isn't all that good.

Well, it seems to have worked on you! The way the argument goes is that people refuse to believe obvious truths and evidence - e.g., they "drank the Kool-Aid." Ignoring the multiple cases of evidence presented by folks here personally and then saying, "Well, it didn't happen to me so it must not exist" - blindly believing - this is the definition of "drinking the Kool-Aid." Check it out:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kool-aid#.22Drinking_the_Kool-Aid.22

No offense, but it's best to get the terminology correct.

sm
March 2, 2009, 03:13 AM
1.
Clean?
WE are supposed to clean these things?
I last inspected and maintained some back in October of 2008.

2.
WD 40.
When was Ford President?
The reason I ask, I think that was the last time I was near a can of WD-40.
I don't recall every having a can coming up, or a Marvel Mystery Oil for that matter.

If MMO smells like wintergreen, then that is what that fella was using in a air hose.

Clean...really?

DELTAJOHN
March 2, 2009, 05:14 AM
I do not spray it directly on my guns, I do however spray it on a rag, and wipe them down with it. I suspect it could leave a gummy residue, but no proof. I did buy a used Delta Elite with a gummed firing pin, it could have been old WD 40, but I don't know for sure. I cleaned it, and only wipe the outside down with WD, and a quick damp patch on the bore. No rust issues, and my safe is not moisture protected. Yes, even under the grips of my 1911's are preserved with no signs of rust.

John

pgeleven
March 2, 2009, 06:26 AM
on the military side, WD-40 is a massive no-no on weapons. its a great lube but its also a penetrant that will burn off too quickly. there is stuff on the shelf already made for firearms that maybe we shouldnt shortcut around. overspray some WD40 on wood furniture and see what happens....

moooose102
March 2, 2009, 08:05 AM
we had a few cans of it while we were growing up. after (like many others) we found out the hard way that it gums everything up, we pretty much quit using it. i can't remember the last time there was a can in my garage.

HoosierQ
March 2, 2009, 09:17 AM
I used to think WD-40 was OK. However, I have directly experienced the gunking up (varnishing whatever) effect on tools and my Moisin-Nagant. It was easy enough to remove but I will not do it again.

I have seen the gunk with my own eyes. If you need to go with a cheap solution that is good...there are many: synthetic motor oil and good old 3-in-1 among many others.

I am a CLP and or Hoppes man. I really miss Gunslick. I have a private stash but it won't last forever.

dmazur
March 2, 2009, 09:44 AM
I used to think WD-40 was OK. However, I have directly experienced the gunking up (varnishing whatever) effect on tools and my Moisin-Nagant. It was easy enough to remove but I will not do it again.

Exactly. The reason I used the Ruger .44 carbine as an example was because the magazine tube isn't designed to come apart. It is very difficult to clean the inside of it once it becomes "tacky" from WD-40 accumulation. It takes years of "just a little", but eventually it can accumulate into a problem.

We had a similar problem with electrical contactors. Some of them, with sliding parts with little clearance, would develop trouble. We tore them completely down and found WD-40 gum.

The crazy thing is, the problem can actually be masked by constant use of WD-40. As it acts like a solvent, it can free up the gum for a period, until the parts dry thoroughly. Then the problem reappears.

So I still use WD-40 in other applications. Not gun cleaning or lubricating. I'm just a little more aware of what it is doing, and I try not to use it in areas that are hard to clean, because of the potential gum formation over time.

SlamFire1
March 2, 2009, 10:03 AM
WD-40 is nothing more than Stoddards solvent (aka: "mineral spirits") and a light minerally derived petroleum oil propelled by CO2. It works well as a penetrant and water displacer; has "very light" lubricating properties

Thanks! I learned something from your post.

I was able to research Stoddards Solvent:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_spirit

and that had a WD-40 link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD-40

X-Rap
March 2, 2009, 10:06 AM
[QUOTE][Harold Mayo
Senior Member



Join Date: 12-24-02
Location: Bowling Green, KY
Posts: 1,011 300+ firearms cleaned and lubed almost exclusively with WD-40 over 20+ years and no signs of rust or wear indicating poor lubrication...looks like the kool-aid isn't all that good.
/QUOTE]
Sounds like you have enough experience to have some credibility but the anti wd force is strong here.
After reading the last page I'm surprised its not being blamed for cancer. It seems that no other solvent or lube will accumulate sludge and grime if left to pool in un cleaned assemblys.

dmazur
March 2, 2009, 10:22 AM
Not arguing, just explanation -

The WD40 film can be very, very thin. It can be everywhere, because of the typical spray application. And it can be very sticky, almost like Scotch tape.
Once misuse develops this, it can be very hard to remove with normal solvents and gravity to do a "flush".

Of course overlubrication can create a dirty sludge if cleaning is neglected.

What is wanted, IMO, is a lubricant that is tenacious enough to resist gravity (and reasonable amounts of water) but runs off easily when hit with a solvent. Then you reapply judicious amounts of lubricant, in the areas that need it, and go forward until the next cleaning. I believe many, if not most, of the modern gun lubricants meet this requirement.

RoadkingLarry
March 2, 2009, 10:34 AM
WD-40 is solely responsible for cancer, global warming, male pattern baldness, ED, ADD, ADHD, BHO, NWO, the extinction of the wooley mamouth, Arctic ice caps melting, the hole in the ozone layer, the decline and fall of the Roman empire, liberalism, Mexican drug cartels, Africanized killer bees, slow internet connections, daylight savings time, BPH, PMS, mad cow disease, typhoid, mumps, measles, halitosis, ingrown toe nails, fake scottish accents, athleats foot, jock itch, pro baseball steroids use, inflation, deflation, stagflation, and is suspected to have been involved in the post katrina New Orleans gun confiscations.
YMMV

jimmyraythomason
March 2, 2009, 10:46 AM
But RoadkingLarry, I thought former President G.W.Bush was responsible for all of that.

_JT_
March 2, 2009, 10:58 AM
My browning auto 5 had some scratches that rusted after a very wet and rainy hunting trip. The WD 40 did a great job cleaning her up. I used to work as a landscaper, our work vehicles were rust buckets, but they were kept together thanks my my endless WD40'ing everything.

X-Rap
March 2, 2009, 10:59 AM
[QUOTE][The WD40 film can be very, very thin. It can be everywhere, because of the typical spray application. And it can be very sticky, almost like Scotch tape.
Once misuse develops this, it can be very hard to remove with normal solvents and gravity to do a "flush".
/QUOTE]
I have to go along with post #63. I have yet to see my guns looking like the oilpan of a 1978 Chevy Vega. I don't have mildew forming on the furniture. They do not rust while in storage. It is not the only product that I have on my bench and I do not believe it is put on the earth by Satan. It is however a very good penetrant so keep it away from your scopes and primers.

RoadkingLarry
March 2, 2009, 11:08 AM
But RoadkingLarry, I thought former President G.W.Bush was responsible for all of that.
He was under the evil mind control influence of WD-40

06
March 2, 2009, 11:11 AM
In boot camp at PIsland we completely cleaned our rifles. Put them in boiling soapy water, ran drill powered bore brushes through them, brushed them with solvent and then sprayed them with very light amounts of WD-40. The next day was command inspection. Afterwards we turned in our 14s and they were put into storage. The WD was an unapproved lub. but we used it anyway. When I put firearms into the safe I liberally spray the bores/actions/and exposed metal. They always come out rust free. I do clean them prior to firing and never have any problems. I have gone to using Rusty Duck or Rem Oil or Tetra(hate the smell) as my lubs but have been guilty of using 30 weight when others are unavailable. Cotton swabs and oil or light grease go into roller channels and onto rails/wear points. My motto on the job and about guns is: oil is the cheapest repair you can do!!! Will add, and the best, wc

Harold Mayo
March 2, 2009, 11:11 AM
No offense, but it's best to get the terminology correct.

The terminology IS correct. It goes way beyond personal experience but I've learned not to share too much that's not first hand. I won't disparage anyone specifically, but I tend to doubt doom and gloom internet stories told by most persons as they are usually made up after reading something and the people just want to jump on the bandwagon in the discussion. It's like Wolff ammo threads. I've fired MANY thousands of rounds of the stuff and never had a problem with it in any of multiple firearms in multiple calibers and for different uses (and I can even include "in different climates"). It's even printed what are basically one enlarged .223 hole groups at 100 yards off the bench in my Bushmaster Varminter, so I am disinclined to believe much of what I hear about it because what I've done personally is statistically significant.

Tirod
March 2, 2009, 01:35 PM
My experience with WD 40 is this - never use it in door locks. I can't tell you how many cylinders I've restored to function after cleaning out all the gummed up residue from facility maintenance workers spraying WD40 into lock cylinders for years. It doesn't work in that application - it never gets out completely. Hinges on doors? Even worse - it's too light and the squeaks return. Commerical lock and hinge makers specifically tell you not to use any - ANY - wet spray oils, only graphite.

Now - apply that to firearms. Use it if you want - DOD has put down their foot and made it heresy - but, yes, it will do what a lot of people expect. It will act as a solvent flushing out loose crud, and dry to a pleasant finish.

But what it will not do is clean and "lubricate" weapons. That requires copious amounts of GI "Elbow Grease," which is exactly what the WD sprayers are trying to avoid. WD40 is the lazy man's answer to proper maintenance, as this thread has pointed out well. As for lube, most makers only ask for a dab on the rails or barrel ramp, not a hose down.

Used with the directed amounts of "Elbow Grease," any solvent will do. But WD40 alone is pretty much the last thing I grab for precision mechanical objects, especially in a spray can. It isn't a miracle, but it seems to marketed that way.

Invented by Satan? No, but it is misused by his imps daily.

481
March 2, 2009, 02:11 PM
Thanks! I learned something from your post.



SlamFire1-

Thanks. Glad to help out whenever and wherever I can. :)

The constituents of WD-40 are pretty innocuous for the most part.

The "Stoddard's solvent" formulation within WD-40 is made up of straight white mineral spirits, hydrotreated heavy naphtha and lightly hydrotreated paraffinic petroleum distillates.

The chief complaints that appear to "crop up" with the use WD-40 arise from its misuse, using alot of it and never removing the residue that it leaves over the extended time and accumulation. The "gummy" build up that occurs over extended time periods and with voluminous exposure are a result of evaporation of the hydrotreated paraffinic distillates. Over time and with exposure to heat and simple evaporative processes, the repetitive application and resultant deposition of lightly hyrotreated paraffinic solvent eventually accumulates into a "waxy", slightly brittle "residue" that can be problematic and seems to find its way into the closer tolerances of some firearms.

Taken care of properly, through the proper cleaning of your firearm, it will not have the chance to accumulate in the amounts necessary to cause "problems" and I suspect that most of those here that are complaining about its "insufficiency" or "inappropriateness" for cleaning firearms are not the most fastidious sort when it comes to the proper maintenance and care of their firearms.

Any product misused, intentionally or uninintentionally, even those that are marketed as being "firearms specific", can lead to unanticipated issues.

streakr
March 2, 2009, 09:13 PM
40 tries to get it right? Not bad.

Salverson 606 was the 606th attempt to find a drug to treat syphilis...but I digress.

WD 40 works great to remove water and gunk from firearms but I always re-lube with something else. I used it alot when goose/duck hunting on the Eastern shore of Maryland. Remove the wood stocks and spray the internals until everything comes out. Dry with air and re-lube.

s

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